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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Effective Program Practices Bibliography

Effective Program Practices

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 176 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years focused on childhood nutrition policies, studies, and guidelines as well as nutrition education materials for parents and children.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 176 records.

Connaway LS. 2015. The library in the life of the user: Engaging with people where they live and learn. Dublin, OH: OCLC Research, 12 pp.

Annotation: This set of papers discuss library user behaviors, information needs and information seeking practices, with a focus on how people engage with technology and get their information for both personal and academic situations, as well as the importance of engaging and relationship building in providing successful and effective services.

Keywords: Client characteristics, Library services, Relationships

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2015. State profiles fiscal year 2014: A portrait of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the states. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States,

Annotation: These resources for advocates, educators, policymakers, public health professionals, parents, youth, and community stakeholders comprise profiles of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the United States. Topics include federal funding by state, total federal spending on abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, sexuality and HIV/STD education policies by state, and descriptions of evidence-based and comprehensive approaches to pregnancy-, STD-, HIV/AIDS-prevention and sexuality education programs.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Federal MCH programs, Government financing, HIV, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State MCH programs

California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative Preeclampsia Task Force. 2014. Preeclampsia toolkit: Improving health care response to preeclampsia–A California toolkit to transform maternity care. Stanford, CA: California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to guide and support health professionals and others working in clinics, hospitals, and other health care settings develop methods within their facilities to recognize and respond to preeclampsia. Contents include care guidelines in checklist, flowchart, and table chart formats; a compendium of 18 best practice articles; a slide set for professional education; and educational material for pregnant women and their families.

Contact: California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford University Medical School Office Building, 1265 Welch Road, MS 5415, Stanford, CA 94305, Telephone: (650) 725-6108 Fax: (650) 721-5751 E-mail: main@cmqcc.org Web Site: http://www.cmqcc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Guidelines, Model programs, Perinatal care, Preeclampsia, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals

Carroll L, Perez MM, Taylor RM, rapporteurs; Institute of Medicine, Forum on Global Violence Prevention; National Research Council. 2014. The evidence for violence prevention across the lifespan and around the world: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 148 pp.

Center for the Study of Social Policy. 2014. Expectant and parenting youth in foster care: A resource guide. Washington, DC; New York, NY: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 95 pp.

Annotation: This compendium lists programs, interventions, and initiatives that are evidence-informed and those that hold promise for serving expectant and parenting youth and their children within foster care systems. The contents are organized into three major categories: parenting supports, developmental supports for children and parents, and preparation for adulthood. Each entry includes the name of the program, initiative, intervention, or training curriculum; results that the program, intervention, initiative, or training curriculum attempts to achieve; the target population; a description; the source of the evidence-informed clearinghouse; evidence of effectiveness; a location; and the website source or key contact for more information. Related resources such as fact sheets, reports, toolkits, and guides are also included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Curricula, Foster care, Intervention, Model programs, Pregnant adolescents, Program evaluation, Resources for professionals, Training

Esposito AM, Del Grosso P, Kleinman R, Sama-Miller E, Paulsell D. 2014. Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities: Final report [2nd rev.]. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 137 pp.

Annotation: This report describes findings from a review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The report describes the review process that the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) team used to identity, screen, and assess the research literature and review results. (HomVEE is a systematic review of home visiting research launched by the Administration for Children and Families and the Department of Health and Human Services in 2009.) The report also presents descriptive information from studies on participant outcomes measures, provides descriptions of the home visiting model characteristics, and discusses lessons learned. It is an update of a report that was issued in 2012.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Children, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Prevention, Research

Jones CA. 2014. Uplifting the whole child: Using wraparound services to overcome social barriers to learning. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, 17 pp. (Roadmap to expanding opportunity: Evidence on what works in education)

Annotation: This paper describes wraparound services (defined as student and family supports integrated with and often delivered in schools) to address social and non-academic barriers to student learning. Contents include background, a summary of three case studies (in New York City, Tulsa, and California Healthy Start), five key features of a high-quality wraparound services model that could be implemented across Massachusetts, and a statewide cost projection. The report concludes with a discussion of policy considerations.

Contact: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 426-1228 Web Site: http://www.massbudget.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Costs, Educational reform, Family support services, Health services delivery, Learning, Local initiatives, Massachusetts, Policy development, Program models, Service integration, Social factors, State initiatives, Students

Kilburn MR, ed. 2014. Programs that work, from the Promising Practices Network on Children, Families and Communities. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation, 534 pp. (RAND tool)

Annotation: This document contains summaries of effective programs and practices for improving child, youth, and family outcomes. Contents include primary evidence criteria; lists of programs by age of child and by type of setting, service, and outcome addressed; and descriptions of programs reviewed for the period 2000 to 2014. Each description includes information on outcome areas, indicators, topic areas, and evidence level (proven or promising); program participants; evaluation methods and key findings; probable implementers and implementation detail; funding; issues to consider; example sites; contact information; resources; and a bibliography.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Youth

National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center. 2014. A guide to evidence-based programs for adolescent health: Programs, tools, and more. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 14 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health professionals and communities contains an annotated list of resources and accompanying tools for implementing evidence-based adolescent health programs. The guide defines evidence-based programs, explains how they are used, and identifies limitations of existing programs. The resources in the guide are organized by health topics adapted from the focus areas of the Healthy People 2020 Core Indicators for Adolescent and Young Adult Health. Topics include healthy development, unintentional injury, violence, mental health, substance use, sexual health, obesity, physical activity, and tobacco. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Healthy People 2020, Model programs, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Young adults

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Best practices for comprehensive tobacco control programs. [Atlanta, GA]: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 141 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help states plan and establish comprehensive tobacco control programs. It describes an integrated programmatic structure for implementing interventions proven to be effective and provides the recommended level of state investment to reach these goals and to reduce tobacco use in each state. On the basis of evidence of effectiveness documented in the scientific literature and the experiences of state and local programs, the guide identifies the most effective population-based approaches with the following overarching components: state and community interventions, mass-reach health communication interventions, cessation interventions, surveillance and evaluation, infrastructure administration and management.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive programs, Intervention, Model programs, Population surveillance, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Program management, Public health infrastructure, Smoking cessation, State programs, Tobacco

Save the Children. 2014. A national report card on protecting children during disasters. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 1 v.

Annotation: This report evaluates basic state emergency preparedness plans for children in each state and the District of Columbia, and highlights a critical standard that every state should have in place to address the most vulnerable children in child care. Standards discussed include an evacuation plan for children in child care, plans for reuniting children with their families after a disaster, a plan for children with disabilities and those with access and functional needs, and a multi-hazard plan for K-12 schools. The report provides state-by-state data with successful examples as well as a description of the study methodology.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children, Children with special health care needs, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Infants, State surveys, Young children

Solomon-Fears C. 2014. Teenage pregnancy prevention: Statistics and programs. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides statistics on teen pregnancy and births in the United States from 1950-2012, together with information on federal strategies and programs to reduce teen pregnancies. It reviews trends at both the state and national levels; discusses the financial and social costs of teen births; and discusses reasons for the fluctuation in adolescent birth rates over time. The report also describes federal strategies to reduce teen pregnancy during FY1998-FY2014 and includes descriptions of current federal pregnancy prevention programs. In conclusion, the report discusses evidence-based models based on evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs

Contact: Federation of American Scientists, 1725 DeSales Street, NW, Suite 600, Washington , DC 20036-4413, Telephone: (202) 546-3300 E-mail: fas@fas.org Web Site: http://www.fas.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Birth rates, Federal programs, Model programs, Pregnancy prevention, Reports, Statistics, Trends

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Violence Prevention. 2013–. VetoViolence™: Violence education tools online. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website provides information for anyone working to help prevent violence in America. It explains primary prevention, public health approach, the social ecological model, and social norms and provides strategies to help prevent suicide, sexual violence, child abuse and neglect, youth violence, and intimate partner violence. Included are free accredited training programs; resources for program planning, implementation, and evaluation; and success stories featuring existing prevention programs and strategies.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Distance education, Guidelines, MCH programs, Model programs, Training, Violence prevention

ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry. 2013. Topical fluoride for caries prevention: Full report of the updated clinical recommendations and supporting systematic review—A report of the Council on Scientific Affairs. Chicago, IL: ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry, 118 pp.

Annotation: This report provides evidence-based recommendations for the use of professionally applied topical fluorides to prevent dental caries. The report addresses the impact of topical fluoride vs. no topical fluoride on new and early carious lesions; which topical fluoride was most effective in preventing, arresting, or reversing dental caries; and whether an oral prophylaxis before application improved fluoride uptake. The report also describes the systematic review of the literature, methodologies used to develop the clinical recommendations, limitations related to the evidence and review, and future research needs.

Contact: American Dental Association, Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Web Site: http://ebd.ada.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Early childhood caries, Flouride, Oral health, Resources for professionals, Young children

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Law and policy issues in reducing firearm violence among children and teens: The role of public health. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network,

Annotation: This webinar focuses on law and policy issues in reducing firearm violence among children and adolescents. It addresses the scope of the problem of intentional and unintentional firearm-related injuries among teens and children; best practices, policies, and programs for reducing firearm-related injuries; commonly used practices, policies, and programs that have not proven to be effective; and the challenges in public health law related to firearms and what they mean for practitioners. The webinar was cosponsored by the Children's Safety Network and the Network for Public Health Law.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Firearm safety, Gun violence, Injury prevention, Legislation, Policy, Public health

Clemmons N, Friedrich S, Segar H, Sprangers K. 2013. Impact evaluation of the state implementation grants for integrated community systems for children with special health care needs: Classes of 2008, 2009, 2011. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the first three cohorts of the Maternal Child Health Bureau’s State Implementation Grant Program grantees’ accomplishments and highlights strategies which catalyze changes that yield the greatest system improvements, based on an evaluation of the program in 28 states, the District of Columbia, and the Navajo Nation. Examples of promising or best practices are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Health care systems, Model programs, Outcome evaluation, Service delivery systems, Service integration, State MCH programs

Connolly CA. 2013. A history of the Commonwealth Fund's child development and preventive care program. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 48 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the Commonwealth Fund's recent efforts to create an integrated model of well-child care capable of addressing children's cognitive, emotional, and social development needs. It explores the development of well-child care in the United States in the 20th century, focusing on turning points and emphasizing the fund's initiatives and their contributions to child health care; traces the creation of the fund's Child Development and Preventive Care program and provides an intellectual history of the theories and philosophies informing it; examines how the program built momentum for change, engaged stakeholders, and generated evidence; and analyzes lessons learned from the program and considers them in the context of enduring issues in American society.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Evidence based health care, History, Model programs, National initiatives, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, Service integration, Well child care

Cowan KC, Vaillancourt K, Rossen E, Pollitt K. 2013. A framework for safe and successful schools. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists, 14 pp.

Annotation: This joint statement provides a framework supported by educators for improving school safety and increasing access to mental health supports for children and adolescents. Topics include policy recommendations to support effective school safety, best practices for creating safe and successful schools, and the roles of key leadership personnel regarding school safety and climate. The statement concludes with a discussion of actions that principals can take to promote safe and successful schools, a list of guidelines for effective practice, and supporting research and resources. A list of endorsing organizations is included.

Contact: National Association of School Psychologists, 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 657-0270 Secondary Telephone: (866) 331-NASP Fax: (301) 657-0275 E-mail: sgorin@naspweb.org Web Site: http://www.nasponline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Leadership, Mental health, Model programs, Policy development, Research, Safety, School age children, Schools

D'Angelo AV, Rich L, Kwiatt J. 2013. Integrating family support services into schools: Lessons from the Elev8 Initiative. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief uses data from Chapin Hall’s evaluation of the Elev8 Full-Service Schools Initiative as a case study to focus on the challenges and benefits of offering economic support services to low income families at schools. Based on their findings, the authors conclude that the Elev8 Initiative, which brings together schools, families, and the community in underserved neighborhoods, shows promise as a way to provide support services to families while improving the educational opportunities for their children. Using lessons learned from the Eval8 Initiativ, the authors present recommendations for future efforts to integrate economic support services into schools. Their suggested strategies include hiring long-term staff members to build trusting relationships with parents; offering economic support services in conjunction with a broader array of services; ensuring clear lines of communication between partner organizations; and taking steps to ensure parents’ privacy.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Economic factors, Educational factors, Evaluation, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Models, Partnerships, School-linked programs

Mullen C. 2013. State opportunities and strategies for breastfeeding promotion through the Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Center on Health Reform Implementation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores how states and communities can capitalize on the opportunities presented by the Affordable Care Act to advance breastfeeding. In particular, it examines state partnerships; financing of breastfeeding support and counseling services; promoting worksite accommodations; and using the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program to improve referral and tracking. The brief also highlights some of the best practices of state Title V maternal and child health programs and their partners and offers strategies for states interested in developing similar efforts.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Financing, Health care reform, Home visiting, Model programs, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Workplace

New York Academy of Medicine. 2013. A compendium of proven community-based prevention programs. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health; New York, NY: New York Academy of Medicine, 59 pp.

Annotation: This compendium provides examples from a literature review conducted by the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) evaluating the effectiveness of community-based disease prevention programs designed to reduce tobacco use, increase physical activity, and/or improve eating habits. The compendium includes examples not included in the original report of evidence-based community prevention programs that have helped reduce rates of asthma, falls among the elderly, and sexually transmitted diseases as well as other topics.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Disease prevention, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Literature reviews

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

Whitt-Glover MC, Porter AT, Yancey TK, Alexander RC, Creecy JM. 2013. Do short physical activity breaks in classrooms work?. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; San Diego, CA: Active Living Research, 9 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes research on how programs that provide physical classroom activity breaks impact students' physical activity levels, on-task behavior, and other health outcomes. Barriers to providing physical activity breaks during the school day are discussed. The brief also includes a list of school physical activity programs with a brief description of each.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child health, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Programs, Research, School health, Weight management

Zero to Three. 2013. State policy action team meeting: Moving an infant-toddler policy agenda. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the proceedings from a May 2013 meeting of teams from five states to discuss strategies for developing and moving forward on an infant-toddler policy agenda. Participants explored innovative state models and strategies for developing and moving an infant policy agenda; assist other states in their efforts to establish an infant-toddler policy agenda; and promote relationships and continued collaborative work among participants. Topics explored during the meeting included policy development, outreach to families, professional development systems integration, coordinated screening and referral systems, effective communication, data systems, and quality improvement,

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family support services, Illinois, Infant health, Infants, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Model programs, New Jersey, Outreach, Pennsylvania, Policy development, Quality assurance, Screening, Service integration, State initiatives, Young children

National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths. (2012). Child injury prevention tool: Selecting best practices. Okemos, MI: National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths,

Annotation: This website provides information to help identify effective strategies and evidence-based interventions to help prevent childhood injuries. Site users can choose the mechanism (or cause) of injury that they are working to prevent and then find an overview of the problem, links to resources and partners, and recommended or promising prevention strategies in the areas of education, legislation and policy, modification of products, physical environments, and social environments. The strategies presented were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature and review by experts in the field of child injury prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Injury prevention, Interventions, Model programs, Prevention programs

University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence. 2012–. Blueprints for healthy youth development. Boulder, CO: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, multiple items.

Annotation: This registry provides information about evidence-based positive youth development programs designed to promote the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Contents include surveys for matching children's strengths and needs to specific programs based on outcome areas, risk and protective factors, and developmental stage; the program review criteria fact sheet, checklist, and standard; a searchable database that provides each program's name, target population, financing strategies, rating (promising or model program), benefits and costs, impact, and summary; instructions for nominating a program; related publications; and other resources.

Contact: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, 483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-4083, Telephone: (303) 492-1032 Fax: (303) 492-2151 E-mail: blueprints@colorado.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Certification, Child development, Children, Databases, Developmental stages, Health promotion, Information sources, Mental health, Model programs, Needs assessment, Prevention programs, Program planning, Protective factors, Registries, Research, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Surveys, Violence prevention

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2012-. Registries of programs effective in reducing youth risk behaviors. Atlanta, GA: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health,

Annotation: This resource identifies registries of child- and adolescent-related programs recommended by federal agencies on the basis of expert opinion or a review of design and research evidence. The programs focus on different health topics, risk behaviors, and settings. Some, but not all, of the programs have shown evidence in reducing youth risk behaviors.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Health behavior, Intervention, Model programs, Prevention programs, Registries, School age children, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Evidence-Based Practice Committee. 2012. House of Delegates report: Marketing of evidence-based practice. , 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the development and evaluation of a comprehensive marketing plan aimed at broadening the access to and utilization of evidence-based practice resources by Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians Registered. It describes target audiences; marketing strategies and tactics; activities conducted and their outcomes and measure; and next steps.

Contact: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, Telephone: (800) 877-1600 Secondary Telephone: (312) 899-0400 Web Site: http://www.eatright.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Initiatives, Marketing, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation

Alexander D, Schor EL. 2012. Conceptualizing best practices for maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document defines the term "best practice" and discusses the best practice continuum, which includes emerging, promising, and best practices in maternal and child health. The document also addresses considerations for philanthropy. A list of 2012 awardees from the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs for especially innovative emerging, promising, and best MCH practices is included.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Evaluation, MCH programs, Philanthropy, Public health, Quality assurance, Women's health

American Public Health Association, Safe Routes to School National Partnership. 2012. Promoting active transportation: An opportunity for public health. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 26 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides an overview of public health considerations in transportation planning and decision-making, emphasizing the importance of promoting physical activity and active modes of transportation such as biking and walking. The guide explains how transportation programs are organized and funded, and suggests ways that public health professionals can become leaders in the development of active transportation policies. It includes case studies of success stories, communication strategies to build relationships, and examples of various ways to become involved in transportation, land use, and built environment decisions at various levels (community, regional, and state). A variety of additional resources and ideas, are provided throughout the guide to help health professionals become actively engaged in the process of promoting active transportation.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Model programs, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Public health, Transportation, Urban environment

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Disparities and inequities in maternal and infant health outcomes. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief explores the importance of maternal and infant health disparities as a public health concern. It discusses racial and ethnic disparities, economic impact, infant mortality, maternal disparities, prenatal care, geographical disparities and telemedicine, and breastfeeding, It also highlights programs that states have implemented to deal with these issues.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Infant health, Infant mortality, Prenatal care, Prevention, Racial factors, State programs, Women's health

Bandy T. 2012. What works for male children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet on male children and adolescents examines programs and interventions that work (as well as those that don't work) as this population transitions into young adulthood. It examines the challenges that can impede the healthy development of young people, highlighting differences between males and females, and summarizes findings from a review of 115 interventions that either target or provide impact data on male children and adolescents. Outcome areas include academic achievement, delinquency, acting out, mental health, physical health and nutrition, reproductive health and sexuality, social skills, and substance use.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Child development, Evaluations, Gender, Interventions, Literature reviews, Male children, Reports, Risk factors

Behrens D, Lear JG, Price OA. 2012. Developing a business plan for sustaining school mental health services: Three success stories. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report presents case studies of three school mental health programs in Pennsylvania; Washington, DC; and Minnesota that have crafted financial policies and processes that support their work. The goal of the report is to shed light on on some best practices to be considered in searching for strategies to sustain school mental health services. Each case study includes a program description and information about who is served, services offered, program funding, successes, and challenges. Also included is a discussion of business planning for sustainable school-based mental health services.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, District of Columbia, Financing, Mental health programs, Mental health services, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, School health programs, Schools

Bell K, Terzian MA, Moore KA. 2012. What works for female children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This research brief examines programs and strategies that work and that do not work for improving health and mental health outcomes for females. A companion brief does the same for males. The brief synthesizes findings from 106 random assignment intent-to-treat evaluations of social interventions that targeted female children, adolescents, and young adults or co-ed interventions that provide separate data for the female subgroup. The brief introduces the problem and discusses interventions that address the following issues: academic achievement, delinquency, mental health, physical health and nutrition, reproductive health and sexuality, self-sufficiency, substance use.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Depression, Female adolescents, Female children, Health, Intervention, Mental health, Nutrition, Programs, Reproductive health, Research, Sexuality, Substance abuse, Young adults

Caleb Drayton FL, Walker D, Mikolowsky K, Staub-DeLong L, Austin C, Wilson S. 2012. FIndings from a review of grantee programs for promoting healthy weight in women. Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, 83 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes results of a review of programs implemented by 14 original Healthy Weight grantees to identify best practices and lessons learned for promoting healthy weight among women. It describes how the study was conducted and lessons learned as to facilitators and barriers to program success. The study reviewed all applications, interim reports, and final reports of the grantee programs funded and implemented from September 2004 through April 2010. Program descriptions are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Abt Associates Inc., 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 913-0500 Fax: (301) 652-3618 Web Site: http://www.abtassociates.com/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Community programs, Federal MCH programs, Model programs, Program evaluation, Weight management, Women

Chrisler A, Moore KA. 2012. What works for disadvantaged and adolescent parent programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social programs and interventions for children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about programs that work and do not work to improve outcomes for adolescent parents with low incomes and their children. The fact sheet reviews 20 parenting programs that are geared toward enhancing parents' development, educating them about effective parenting methods, or both. The fact sheet introduces the issue and reports findings for programs in six outcome areas: child outcomes: health; child outcomes: behaviors and development; parent outcomes: reproductive health; parent outcomes: mental health and behaviors; parent outcomes: education, employment, and income; and parenting outcomes. Promising approaches and future research needs are also discussed.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behaviors, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child development Parent support programs, Child health, Education, Employment, Family income, High risk groups, Low income groups, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Reproductive health, Research

Daro D, Hart B, Boller K, Bradley MC. 2012. Replicating home visiting programs with fidelity: Baseline data and preliminary findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall; Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 156 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report discusses the logic of a framework used to monitor program implementation and fidelity across evidence-based home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. It also outlines key components and indicators, as well as utility, in three areas, home visitor and supervisory caseloads, service duration, and service dosage. Contents also include data collection and analysis methods, profiles of participants and home visitors/supervisors, characteristics and content of home visits, assessing three dimensions of structural fidelity, and conclusions and next steps. References and appendices are also included.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Home visiting, MCH research, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation

Flores G. 2012. Community health workers, promotores, and parent workers: Innovative, community-based approaches to improving the health and healthcare of children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 9 pp. (Big ideas: Children in the Southwest)

Annotation: This paper examines how community health workers (CHWs), promotores, and parent mentors can be used to improve the health of children in the Southwest, as well as the health care available to them. The paper provides definitions of CHWs, promotores, and parent mentors and discusses a conceptual framework for providing an understanding of how they can improve children's health and health care; evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness; existing programs; and implications for policy, practice, and research.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child abuse, Child health, Community health workers, Community heath services, Costs, Ethnic factors, Health services, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Income factors, Low income groups, Low income groups, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Southwestern United States, Uninsured persons

Hawkins J, Bonzon E, Rough A. 2012. The built environment. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Omaha, NE: CityMaTCH, 4 pp. (Women's health prevention brief; issue 3)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the importance of addressing the built environment to improve maternal health and birth outcomes. Contents include an overview of the built environment and research on the connections between the built environment and health, the biological and social impacts of an unsupportive built environment on maternal health and birth outcomes, and promising programs at the state and local levels.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental health, Health care systems, Maternal health, Model programs, Pregnancy outcome, Preventive health services, State MCH programs, Urban MCH programs

Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods Project and Health Impact Project. 2012. Health impact assessment: National nutrition standards for snack and a la carte foods and beverages sold in schools. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts, 171 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the relationship between changes in the school food environment and children’s health outcomes. Topics include the potential impact on students' health of national nutrition standards for competitive foods or foods sold in schools individually as snacks, a la carte items, and beverages; school services; and diet and nutrition. The report also presents policy recommendations and promising practices.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, Health Impact Project, 901 E Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 540-6012 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: healthimpactproject@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.healthimpactproject.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Health status, Nutrition policy, Oral health, School age children, Schools, Standards

Korfmacher J, Laszewski A, Sparr M, Hammel J. 2012. Assessing home visiting program quality: Final report to the Pew Center on the States. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Pew Center on the States, 96 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents the findings of a study to field test a comprehensive assessment tool to measure implementation of best practice elements in home visiting programs. The report discusses identifying common best practice elements of home visiting programs, measuring quality, and the evidence base for specific indicators. It includes a literature review of self assessment and credentialing tools, home visit measures and model evaluations.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, Research

Maschinot B, Cohen J. 2012. Supporting babies and families impacted by caregiver mental health problems, substance abuse, and trauma: A community action guide. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 87 pp.

Annotation: This community action guide describes the experiences of a woman and her infant daughter to point out resources that service providers, advocates, and health professionals can use to better understand and respond to the needs of families and children with problems related to mental health, substance abuse, and trauma. The guide also presents information, resources, and tips to foster unified communities that are responsive to families' needs. Topics include the importance of the birth-to-age-5 developmental stage, threats to resilience, levels of stress in young children and families, protective factors, a strategic framework for action, and moving forward. Brief descriptions of successful programs are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4726.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Community programs, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, High risk groups, Infants, Mental health, Parent support services, Resilience, Resource materials, Stress, Substance abuse, Vulnerability, Young children

Meit M, Kronstadt J, Brown A. 2012. Promising practices in the coordination of state and local public health: Final report. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 21 pp.

Annotation: This study highlights promising public health practices in nine different states that involve coordination across federal agencies, state health agencies, and tribal, local, and territorial health departments. The study focuses on state and local health departments that have developed structures and processes to facilitate collaboration in Arizona, California, Florida, Massachusetts, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. Included are key findings in the areas of communication, alignment of funding, and quality improvement. The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago and is part of the National Public Health Improvement Initiative administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Models, Public health, State programs, Studies, service coordination

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2012. Supportive school discipline: A snapshot from Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiatives. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about supportive school discipline—defined as a systemic constellation of programs and practices that promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky ones. The report discusses cross-agency partnerships, data-driven decisions, system-wide use of evidence-based programs and practices, and engagement of parents and families as partners. For each topic, examples are provided for specific school districts. A case study of one child who benefited from supportive school discipline is also provided.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Discipline, Families, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Parents, Prevention, Programs, Schools

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2012. Delivering improvements in infant mortality rates. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Promising practices: Women, children and adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights promising practices aimed at reducing the infant mortality rate in the state of Tennessee. It provides estimates on annual costs associated with poor birth outcomes and describes statewide programs that have shown promise in reducing adverse birth outcomes. The fact sheet highlights two promising partnership programs: (1) The BLUES (Building Lasting Unshakable Expectations into Successes) project, a program that combines socio-emotional counseling with medical care for expectant mothers; and (2) STORC (Solutions to Obstetrics in Rural Counties), a telemedicine initiative that connects at-risk pregnant women in isolated areas with physician specialists. The fact sheet is part of a promising practices series that recognizes emerging and promising programs or policies in maternal and child health.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Model programs, Prevention, State programs, Tennessee

Network for LGBT Health Equity. 2012. Mpowered: Best and promising practices for LGBT tobacco prevention and control. Boston, MA: Network for LGBT Health Equity, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines best and promising practices for tobacco use prevention and control for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community using the World Health Organization’s best practices model, MPOWER (Monitor, Protect, Offer, Warn, Enforce, and Raise), which outlines the key steps for effective tobacco control programs and additional letters -- E for Evaluate (and disseminate) and D for Diversify -- to address all of the key challenges that LGBT and overlapping disparity populations face. The target audience for the report includes policy makers, grant makers, grant applicants, and tobacco control program administrations.

Contact: Network for LGBT Health Equity, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA Telephone: (617) 927-6451 E-mail: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com/contact/ Web Site: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, High risk groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention, Program improvement, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

Pilnik L, Kendall JR. 2012. Victimization and trauma experienced by children and youth: Implications for legal advocates. North Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 16 pp. (Moving from evidence to action; issue brief no. 8)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the impact of exposure to violence in school settings and examines how emerging research and program practice can help school staff to develop programs that meet the needs of children and youth who are exposed to violence. The brief analyzes case scenarios and proposes opportunities for intervention. It discusses the connections between children's exposure to violence and their mental wellness, ability to reach full academic potential, and academic outcomes; and describes promising practices to help teachers, mental health providers, school administrators, and state policy makers prevent and reduce the impact that violence has on children. A variety of evidence-based school mental health interventions are described, along with the challenges that may arise in implementing such programs. A list of guiding principles to support best practices is included.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Intervention, Mental health, Program development, School age children, School health programs, School violence, Violence

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Utilizing new technology to facilitate home visiting, data collection and quality assurance. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (90 min.).

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast December 13, 2012, provides an outline on how to simplify data collection processes through the use of new technology, specifically Thinkpads and TeleHealth Monitors, available to home visiting programs throughout the country. It also provide a description of the Healthy Start, Inc. model of utilizing data collection and abstraction on health and social issues disparately effecting high risk men, women, and children in targeted communities. The audience receives best practice model concepts including program design and specific case management tools and examples resulting in specific outreach and case management strategies to promote positive outcomes for women and their families.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Model programs, Quality assurance, Technology

Spears H, Carman R. [2011]. Increasing trainee survey responses: Best practice methods for obtaining high response rates from trainees. [Silver Spring, MD]: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report describes practices suggested by training centers on disabilities identified by the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) as those that consistently report the highest survey response rates from their trainees. Based on interviews conducted by AUCD with training directors and former trainees from five network programs, the report lists four themes of best practice identified as key components in yielding high trainee survey response rates. The methodology used by AUCD is described in detail, and specific examples of practices that resulted in the highest survey response rates are explained. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental disability programs, Disabilities, Federal programs, Professional training, Program improvement, Surveys

2011-. Reports to Congress. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, annual.

Annotation: This annual report identifies gaps in the evidence base on the effectiveness of clinical preventive services for adults and children and recommends priority areas that deserve further research. Topics include high priority evidence gaps for screening tests, behavioral interventions, and clinical preventive services targeting specific populations and age groups. Next steps and a conclusion are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult health, Child health, Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Prevention services, Research, Treatment effectiveness

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, Ad Hoc Group on Local Oral Health Programs. 2011. Local oral health programs and best practices—Voices from the field: The end-users' perspective. [Sparks, NV]: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies financing, work force, and other challenges faced by local oral health programs (including city, county, and other community-based entities) and offers recommendations. Topics include building infrastructure, enhancing program operations, and improving information on best practices for use by local program staff. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Information dissemination, Local initiatives, Needs assessment, Oral health, Program improvement

Bandy BS, Moore KA. 2011. What works for African American children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 14 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This literature review summarizes findings from evaluations of social interventions and programs that targeted African American children and adolescents. The 53 programs evaluated took place during out-of-school time, and are identified as either found to work, not proven to work, or mixed reviews. The programs and interventions evaluated -- drawn from the Child Trends LINKS database of random assigned, intent-to-treat studies of social interventions for children and adolescents -- are divided into the following categories: substance use, literacy, physical health and nutrition, social skills, school readiness, externalizing, academic achievement, and delinquency.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Children, Intervention, Literature reviews, Minority health, Model programs, Program evaluation, Social programs

Bandy T, Moore KA. 2011. What works for promoting and enhancing positive social skills: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Community programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Burlew R, Philliber S, Suellentrop K. 2011. What helps in providing contraceptive services for teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 22 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes what is know about evaluated clinic interventions that help to prevent adolescent pregnancy. In addition to providing information about specific, clinic-based programs, the monograph reviews some critical policies and practices that may contribute to an intervention's success. The monograph identifies and describes three categories of most effective programs; discusses specific clinic protocols that appear to improve adolescent contracteptive use, as well as characteristics of successful clinics; and provides a chart identifying and describing programs that have been identified as most effective.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Contraception, Family planning clinics, Intervention, Prevention

Chrisler A, Ling T. 2011. What works for early language and literacy development: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and intervention strategies. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents findings from experimental evaluations of fifteen programs and intervention strategies that focused on improving early language and literacy skills. The programs and interventions selected, which were drawn from the Child Trends' database of studies called LINKS (Lifecourse Interventions to Nurture Kids Successfully), focus on strategies to directly improve specific aspects of young children’s language or literacy skills (for example, vocabulary development, print knowledge, and listening skills). A table summarizes the experimental evaluations of the fifteen selected interventions, noting whether they were found to work, not work, or received mixed reviews. Glossaries of terminology and programs reviewed are also provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Early intervention programs, Language development, Literacy, Models, Program evaluation, Youth

Crosse S, Williams B, Hagen CA, Harmon M, Ristow L, DiGaetano R, Broene P, Alexander D, Tseng M, Derzon JH. 2011. Prevalence and implementation fidelity of research-based prevention programs in public schools: Final report. Rockville, MD: Westat, 150 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents descriptive information and key findings from the Study of the Implementation of Research-Based Programs to Prevent Youth Substance Abuse and School Crime funded by the U.S. Department of Education. (The purpose of the study was to measure the prevalence of research-based programs in schools intended to prevent youth substance abuse and school crime and to assess the implementation of those research-based programs.) The report discusses the prevalence of youth alcohol, tobacco, other drug use, and school crime and analyzes research-based efforts to address these problems. Tables compare research-based programs according to type, instructional level, and other variables. A list of effective programs is included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Crime prevention, Evaluation, Model programs, Prevention programs, School linked programs, Studies, Substance abuse prevention, Youth

Greaves L, Poole N, Okoli CTC, Hemsing N, Qu A, Bialystok L, O'Leary R. 2011. Expecting to quit: A best-practices review of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant and postpartum girls and women (2nd ed.). Vancouver, BC: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, 104 pp.

Annotation: This report examines interventions designed to reduce or eliminate smoking during pregnancy. Using a systematic review methodology from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) combined with a "better practices" methodology developed in 2002, the report identifies components of interventions and programs for pregnant smokers that commonly appear in the effective interventions. These components include counseling, peer support, quit guides, partner counseling, information/education, nicotine replacement therapies, incentives, feedback about biological changes, group support, and various forms of follow up. Based on evidence for their effectiveness and methodological strength, the authors recommend 14 interventions and classify 27 others as “showing promise.”

Contact: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, E311 - 4500 Oak Street, Box 48, Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6H 3N1, Telephone: (604) 875-2633 Secondary Telephone: (888) 300-3088 x2633 Fax: (604) 875-3716 E-mail: bccewh@cw.bc.ca Web Site: http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Interventions, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Research reviews, Smoking cessation

McNary L, Plummer A. 2011. A picture of health: A report of Kentucky school districts' health services. Jeffersontown, KY: Kentucky Youth Advocates, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings of a study of school health services offered in Kentucky school districts during the 2008-2009 school year and offers highlights of promising practices across the state. The study addressed physical, oral, and mental health and substance abuse services. Study topics included school health service funding, school health services offered, and types of school health services provided. In addition to the findings, the report presents background and an overview of the school health survey project.

Contact: Kentucky Youth Advocates, 11001 Bluegrass Parkway, Suite 100, Jeffersontown, KY 40299, Telephone: (502) 895-9767 Secondary Telephone: (888) 825-5592 Fax: (502) 895-8225 E-mail: info@kyyouth.org Web Site: http://www.kyyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Oral health, Adolescent health, Child health, Financing, Health services, Kentucky, Mental health, School districts, School health, State programs, State surveys, Substance abuse prevention programs

National School Boards Association. 2011. Families as partners: Fostering family engagement for health and successful students. Alexandria, VA: National School Boards Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of family engagement as it relates to school health and student achievement. It discusses school health policies, practices, and strategies that school boards and public education administrators can use to effectively engage families. Sidebars provide inks to additional tools and resources such as sample family engagement policies, evidence-based practices, and family engagement surveys.

Contact: National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 838-6722 Fax: (703) 683-7590 E-mail: info@nsba.org Web Site: http://www.nsba.org

Keywords: Academic achievement, Education, Family school relations, Parent child relations, Parent participation, School health, School linked programs

Suellentrop K. 2011. What works 2011-2012: Curriculum-based programs that help prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a list of programs that have been evaluated and found to be successful in changing adolescent sexual behavior, including delaying sexual initiation, improving contraceptive use, and reducing adolescent pregnancy. For each program, the document lists selected program effects, contact information, and links to additional program and evaluation information. The document offers advice on how to choose a program, catalogs the characteristics of effective programs, and offers some words of caution about what an effective program actually can accomplish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Brochures, Intervention, Program descriptions

Terzian M, Hamilton K, Ling T. 2011. What works for acting-out (externalizing) behavior: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Model programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Terzian M, Hamilton K, Ericson S. 2011. What works to prevent or reduce internalizing problems of socio-emotional difficulties in adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes lessons learned from rigorously evaluated programs designed to prevent or treat internalizing problems in adolescents. Topics include what internalizing problems were found and what impacts were found, including interventions that were found to work, those that had mixed findings, and those not proven to work. Implications of the findings and needed research are also discussed. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Mental health programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Treatment effectiveness

U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 2011. Innovative state practices for improving the provision of Medicaid dental services: Summary of eight state reports—Alabama, Arizona, Maryland, Nebraska, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Texas, and Virginia. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a review of Alabama’s Medicaid dental program conducted on January 4–8, 2010, to discover practices and program innovations leading to a higher level of oral-health-service use among children in Alabama compared to the national average. The report describes the Smile Alabama initiative, the 1st Look program, Student/Resident Rotations in Community Health, the partnership with the University of Alabama School of Dentistry, and the loan-repayment program.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alabama, Arizona, Children, Collaboration, Health care delivery, Health care utilization, Maryland, Medicaid, Model programs, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oral health, Rhode Island, State programs, Texas, Virginia

U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Training and Technical Assistance Center. 2011. Bullying intervention: What works. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Training and Technical Assistance Center,

Annotation: In this webcast, three bullying-prevention and -intervention experts provide guidance on what bullying is and discuss challenges in defining and identifying bullying behaviors. Presenters highight key findings from research on the prevalence of bullying and the varied roles that children and adolescents can play in bullying situations. Presenters also discuss actions that children and adolescents believe may be helpful in addressing bullying and best-practice strategies to communicate with adolescents who bully, are bullied, or witness bullying.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Intervention, Prevention, Research

Vermont Child Health Improvement Program. 2011. Practice toolkit for improving prenatal care. [Burlington, VT]: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont Department of Pediatrics, var. pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, for health care professionals in Vermont, provides evidence-based care topics for improving the health and prenatal care of pregnant women. It describes the Improving Prenatal Care in Vermont (IPCV) project and identifies "best practice" prenatal guidelines and assists obstetric service providers in incorporating these guidelines in to their office systems. Topics include practice assessment, patient satisfaction, tobacco cessation, nutrition, breastfeeding readiness, gestational diabetes, psychosocial/behavioral, substance abuse, intimate partner violence, depression, preterm labor, infectious disease, environmental exposure, and genetic screening. This is a companion document to the "State Guide for Improving Prenatal Care".

Contact: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Josephs 7, UHC Campus, One South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, Telephone: (802) 656-8210 Fax: (802) 656-8368 Web Site: http://www.med.uvm.edu/vchip Available from the website.

Keywords: Genetic screening, Guidelines, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Resources for professionals, Sexually transmitted diseases, State programs, Vermont

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. [2010]. Promising Practices in Maternal and Child Health Program. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation,

Annotation: The Promising Practices in Maternal & Child Health (MCH) Program is dedicated to facilitating program replication and new collaborations between health plans and other MCH stakeholders, especially those working in communities and in the public sector. This web site provides a searchable database for promising practices programs funded by the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, fact sheets, and MCH searchable databases resources from other groups, such as the National Association of County and City Health Officials Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Toolkit; the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs' Innovation Station; and CityMatCH's Life Course Toolbox. The full web site also includes information on news, research, publications, conferences and webinars, awards, grants, and links to relevant topics in MCH, prevention, and wellness.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Databases, Directories, MCH programs, Maternal health, Model programs, Program descriptions

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2010. The 2010 state public health genomics resource guide [2nd ed.]. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 80 pp.

Annotation: This guide highlights approaches and challenges by states to integrate genomics into their public health programs. The guide is divided into the following three sections: (1) Overview of Public Health Genomics Today, (2) Promising Practices in Public Health Genomics, and (3) Charting a Path in Your State. The framework features state examples and tools and resources that can be used in other states.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Genomics, Model programs, Public health programs, State health agencies, Statewide planning

Berns SD, ed. 2010. Toward improving the outcome of pregnancy III: Enhancing perinatal health through quality, safety and performance initiatives. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes, 139 pp.

Annotation: This book explores the elements that are essential to improving quality, safety and performance across the continuum of perinatal care. it covers the importance of consistent data collection and measurement; evidence-based initiatives; adherence to clinical practice guidelines; the life-course perspective; care that is patient- and family-centered, culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate; policies that support quality perinatal care; and systems change. Each chapter illustrates specific strategies and interventions that incorporate process and systems change that can improve perinatal care, including statewide quality improvement collaboratives. It includes examples of promising and successful initiatives at hospitals and within healthcare systems across the country.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Intervention, Model programs, Model programs, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Program improvement, Safety, State initiatives

Boccanfuso C, Moore KA, Whitney C. 2010. Ten ways to promote educational achievement and attainment beyond the classroom. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 13 pp.

Annotation: This research brief brings together findings from a variety of research resources to identify 10 actionable, feasible goals involving non-school factors that affect educational outcomes and can be addressed through out-of-school-time programs. The goals include (1) reduce unintended pregnancies, (2) improve prenatal and postnatal maternal health, (3) improve parenting practices among parents of infants and young children, (4) improve young children's nutrition and encourage mothers to breastfeed, (5) enhance the quality and availability of educational child care, preschool, pre-kindergarten, and full-day kindergarten, (6) connect children and adolescents with long-term mentors, (7) improve parenting practices among parents of school-age children and adolescents, (8) provide family and couples counseling to improve family functioning, (9) provide high-quality educational after-school and summer programs, and (10) develop positive social skills and reduce delinquency among adolescents. The brief describes research findings related to each goal and types of programs that effectively address each goal.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Breastfeeding promotion, Child care, Children, Early childhood education, Educational attainment, Families, Family support services, Infants, Nutrition, Parenting skills, Prenatal care, Prevention, Programs, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health, Young children

Boonn A. 2010. Tobacco cessation works: An overview of best practices and state experiences. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of smoking cessation and answers the following questions: (1) What is tobacco cessation; (2) why is quitting tobacco use so difficult? (3) how effective are cessation services? (4) how do tobacco cessation services compare to other services? (5) what are the benefits of quitting? and (6) are tobacco cessation insurance benefits and services cost effective? The fact sheet compares individual interventions such as counseling and pharmacotherapy with population-based interventions such as clean air laws and excise tax increases. Included are links to additional tobacco-cessation fact sheets.

Keywords: Intervention, Model programs, Prevention services, Smoking cessation, State initiatives, Tobacco use

California Endowment. 2010. Healthy communities matter: The importance of place to the health of boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights how the neighborhoods where Latino and African-American boys and young men grow up directly influence their health outcomes. It examines racial and ethnic disparities -- and the magnitude of these disparities -- between boys and young men of color and white boys and young men across four broad areas: health, safety, socioeconomic, and ready-to-learn. The report analysis and findings point to the need for comprehensive policy solutions implemented at the community level in order to reduce such disparities. Examples of promising programs in communities across the country are provided.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Life course, Male children, Minority health, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Underserved communities, Young men

Davis M, Jivanjee P, Koroloff N. 2010. Paving the way: Meeting transition needs of young people with developmental disabilities and serious mental health conditions. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 73 pp.

Annotation: This report includes eight case studies of programs providing innovative service for adolescents and young adults (ages 16-24) who have both a developmental disability and a mental health condition. The report also includes six short descriptions of specific best practices. The programs featured in the report include a school-based transition program, outpatient mental health services, an employment-preparation program, programs supporting youth transitions from restrictive environments to community settings, system-level crisis-prevention and intervention planning, and system-level planning and consultation.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Developmental disabilities, Developmental disability programs, Health services, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Model programs, Prevention, Program, Service delivery systems, Social services, Transition planning, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Hadley AM, Hair EC, Dreisbach N. 2010. What works for the prevention and treatment of obesity among children: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 14 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 51 evaluated programs that targeted children and youth from one to 19 years of age for impacts on nutrition, physical activity, and/or weight loss. It discusses how programs that focus on only nutrition, physical activity, or weight loss tend to be more successful than those that simultaneously focus on all three outcome categories and how successful physical activity programs generally implement skill-building techniques, require participants to track their own exercise progress, and may have a therapy or counseling components. The fact sheet includes short descriptions of the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings for nutrition, physical activity, and weight loss.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Program descriptions, Weight management

Hallgren K, Paulsell D, Del Grosso P. 2010. Better beginnings: Developing home-based early learning systems in East Yakima and White Center. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes the progress made by two Washington-state communities in developing home-based early learning (HBEL) services. Based on data collected by Mathematica during site visits in 2008 and 2009, the brief summaries the need for HBEL and the implementation of services during the first year in White Center (outside of Seattle) and East Yakima (in central Washington). It explains how the communities selected programs to implement and how they prepared for service delivery. It then describes the implementation of two established home visiting models (Nurse Family Partnership and Parents as Teachers) and the piloting of a newly developed model(Partnering with Families for Early Learning). The brief concludes by highlighting key lessons learned and next steps for ongoing development of the HBEL service delivery system.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Early childhood education, Home visiting, Model programs, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parent participation, Parent support services, Service delivery systems, Washington

Kahn J, Moore KA. 2010. What works for home visiting programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 33 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This synthesis examines findings from 66 studies that implemented random assignment intent-to-treat experimental evaluations of programs that include home visiting as a program component. Topics include programs that work as well as the intervention strategies that contribute to program success. Analyses are segmented by the target population served (birth to age 3, ages 4-5, 6-11, and 12-17).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Home visiting, Literature reviews, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Studies

Lyman DR, Holt W, Dougherty RH. 2010. State case studies of infant and early childhood mental health systems: Strategies for change. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 28 pp.

Annotation: The study analyzes efforts in Colorado, Indiana, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island to conduct early identification and intervention strategies for children with developmental and mental health problems. The report focuses on strategies states have used to make infant and early childhood mental health systems more comprehensive and the process of change. It highlights different approaches, such as using frequent mental health screening tools in Medicaid's Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment program to improve the health of low-income children.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child mental health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Colorado, EPSDT, Early intervention, Indiana, Low income groups, Massachusetts, Model programs, Rhode Island, Screening, State initiatives

Marjavi A, Ybanez V. 2010. Building domestic violence health care responses in Indian Country: A promising practices report. San Francisco, CA: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report presents best practices to raise awareness, improve clinical responses, and strengthen community partnerships in support of the health and safety of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in Indian Country, Arizona. The best practices are a compilation of stories and strategies implemented at hospitals and clinics that piloted the Family Violence Prevention Fund Project in Indian Country. Topics include why there is violence against Native American women, a history of health care domestic violence reform in Indian Country, domestic violence as a health care issue, and how to create a domestic violence response.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Arizona, Communities, Domestic violence, Families, Health care, Prevention, Safety, Women's health

Reynold AJ, Rolnick AJ, Englund MM, Temple JA, eds. 2010. Childhood programs and practices in the first decade of life: A human capital integration. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 518 pp.

Annotation: This book presents research findings on the effects of a variety of early childhood programs and practices for young children and families and their implications for policy development and reform. It includes discussions from leading scholars in the human development and early childhood learning on the effects and cost-effectiveness of model state and federally funded programs such as Head Start, the WIC nutrition program, Child-Parent Centers, the Perry Preschool, and the Nurse-Family Centers. Part I covers prenatal and infant programs; Part II looks at preschool education; Part III explores kindergarten and early school-age services and practices; Part IV covers the economic synthesis of early childhood investments. Tables compare impacts on selected child and family outcomes by program model and compare state-by-state costs and benefits of selected programs.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/ $36.99, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-521-13233-6.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Federal programs, Model programs, Outcome evaluation, Policy development, Program evaluation, State programs

Saxton J. 2010. Promoting children's social and emotional development. Austin, TX: Texans Care for Children, 11 pp. (Policy briefing paper)

Annotation: This policy briefing paper addresses issues related to promoting children's social and emotional development in Texas. The paper explains why promoting children's social and emotional development is important and discusses current policy in Texas, what research says about best practices for enhancing social and emotional development, and better investment choices for Texas.

Contact: Texans Care for Children, 811 Trinity, Suite A, Austin, TX 78701, Telephone: (512) 473-2274 Fax: (512) 473-2173 E-mail: http://texanscareforchildren.org/EmailUs.asp Web Site: http://www.texanscareforchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Family support services, Financing, Intervention, Parenting skills, Prevention, Public policy, Research, School readiness, Screening, Social skills, State programs, Texas

Harlem Children's Zone. [2009]. From cradle through college: Using evidence-based programs to inform a comprehensive pipeline. New York, NY: Harlem Children's Zone, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies existing best-practice models of community components incorporated in pipelines of support, starting with prenatal programs and ending when young people graduate from college, that seek to help children in poverty and those at high risk secure educational and economic opportunities. The report is intended to help communities interested in developing their own youth-focused, place-based initiatives modeled on the Harlem Children's Zone. It lists programs that have been shown to be effective via their participation in randomized controlled trials (RCTs).

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community programs, Education, Educational attainment, Evaluation, Families, Family support programs, High risk adolescents, High risk children, High risk groups, Infants, Low income groups, Model programs, Poverty, Prenatal care, Young adults, Young children

U.S. Office of Management and Budget. 2009-. Expectmore.gov. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget,

Annotation: This Web site provides information about federal programs and how they are performing. The site describes how programs are assessed and rated using the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) and provides a list of federal programs that have been rated. Users may view a list of programs that are performing or are not performing, or they may select programs by topic or by agency. The listing shows the agency, the program name, the funding level, the date of the last PART assessment, and the rating the program received. Links to each program's home page are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20503, Telephone: (202) 395-3080 Fax: (202) 395-3888 Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Federal programs, Model programs, Program evaluation, Resource materials, World Wide Web

Allen K, Pires SA. 2009. Improving Medicaid managed care for youth with serious behavioral health needs: A quality improvement toolkit. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 39 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit summarizes the experiences of plans that participated in the Collaborative on Improving Managed Care Quality for Youth with Serious Behavioral Health Needs, an initiative that worked with nine health plans to test a number of approaches to better serve children and adolescents with serious emotional disorders. The toolkit presents promising practices implemented by the plans and the resulting impact on access, care, and avoidance of unnecessary services and costs; challenges identified and addressed by the plans and lessons learned; and opportunities for continued innovation.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Community programs, Costs, Emotional instability, Health services, Initiatives, Medicaid managed care, Mental disorders, Model programs

Astuto J, Allen L. 2009. Home visitation and young children: An approach worth investing in?. Social Policy Report 23(4):1-22,

Annotation: This report focuses on home visitation as an early childhood intervention strategy in the United States. It discusses the history of home visitation, reviews the literature on the effectiveness of nationally recognized home visitation interventions, and discusses the limitations of the existing empirical base as well as the lessons learned. The report concludes with considerations for practice, research, and policy in the field of home visitation. Comparative descriptions of key national home visiting models; a listing of the components of home visiting that influence treatment adherence; and a discussion of barriers to policy implementation are included.

Contact: Society for Research in Child Development, , 2950 South State Street, Suite 401, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, Telephone: (734) 926-0600 Fax: (734) 926-0601 E-mail: info@srcd.org Web Site: http://www.srcd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Early intervention, High risk children, Home visiting, Infants, Literature reviews, Model programs, Policy development, Program evaluation, Young children

Children Now and Oral Health Access Council. 2009. Dental cuts bite children, cost all Californians: The case for investing in school-based preventive services. Oakland, CA: Children Now, 16 pp. (Oral health policy brief)

Cooper JL, Masi R, Vick J. 2009. Social-emotional development in early childhood: What every policymaker should know. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on issues that affect socio-emotional development during early childhood. It discusses the prevalence of problems among young children, family and environmental risk factors, the role of foster care and child welfare, the failure of current service delivery and support systems, practice barriers due to Medicaid and other state policies, the adverse impact of unmet needs on young children, and recommendations for policymakers. A chart describes 11 evidence-based strategies for prevention, early recognition and identification, and intervention.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Model programs, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, Foster care, Health services delivery, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Risk factors, Young children

Duran F, Hepburn F, Irvine M, Kaufmann R, Anthony B, Horen N, Perry D. 2009. What works?: A study of effective early childhood mental health consultation programs. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 224 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the findings from a study of six early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) programs that have demonstrated positive child, family, staff, and/ or program outcomes. The study is based on data gathered during two-day site visits and focuses on the following key questions: 1) What are the essential components of effective mental health consultation programs? 2) What are the skills, competencies, and credentials of effective consultants? 3) What are the training, supervision and support needs of consultants? 4) What level of intervention intensity (i.e., frequency and duration) is needed to produce good outcomes? 5) Which outcomes should be targeted and how should they be measured? The study also reports on the extent to which consultation efforts are occurring nationally and provides a series of recommendations from experts in the field to guide policy makers, funders, researchers, evaluators, early childhood mental health consultation providers, and early care and education programs administrators.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consultation, Data collection, Field studies , Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Program evaluation

Iskason E, Higgins LB, Davidson LL, Cooper JL. 2009. Indicators for social-emotional development in early childhood: A guide for local stakeholders. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to give local stakeholders the information and tools necessary to develop and use indicators for social-emotional development. The report includes (1) definitions of key concepts related to establishing indicators; (2) seven recommended indicators for social-emotional development; (3) a framework to determine local priorities and get started with indicator adoption, (4) resources for finding data at the community level for each indicator, and (5) how to interpret and use data collected for each of the suggested indicators. Examples of successful use of these indicators in states and local communities are provided.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Depression, Emotional development, Mental disorders, Social indicators, Statistical data, Young children

Mbwanna K, Terzian M, Moore KA. 2009. What works for parent involvement programs for children: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet synthesizes findings from 67 evaluations of parent-involvement interventions for children ages 6-11 to identify components and strategies associated with successful programs and interventions. Programs sought to engage parents in efforts to achieve outcomes for their child such as academic achievement or attendance, a reduction in internalizing behaviors such as depression or anxiety and of externalizing behaviors such as aggression, avoidance of substance abuse, avoidance of risky sexual behavior, and achieving health and fitness. The fact sheet presents lessons learned from programs that work, don't work, or have mixed results.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Anxiety, Child behavior, Child health, Children, Depression, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parent child relations, Parents, Prevention, Program evaluation, Programs, Sexual behavior, Substance abuse

Pitt Barnes S, Robin L, Dawkins N, Leviton L, Kettel Khan L. 2009. Early assessment of programs and policies to prevent childhood obesity: Comprehensive school physical activity programs--Evaluability assessment synthesis brief. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a project to identify and assess local-level programs and policies that have been implemented with apparent success to prevent obesity by improving the eating habits and physical activity levels of children ages 3-17. The report focuses on the evaluability assessments conducted on comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs), which includes programming before, during, and after the school day. Topics include the extent to which CSPAPs have been implemented and the limitations of implementation in one school and one school district. The report concludes with lessons learned and recommendations to inform future implementation by district and school personnel and other key decision makers. The appendices contain the selection critieria, interview topics, and logic model.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, After school programs, Children, Ethnic groups, Health behavior, Local initiatives, Low income groups, Model programs, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy analysis, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, School health programs, Young children

Rugge B, King V, Davis E, Schechtel M, Hickam D. 2009. Gestational diabetes: Caring for women during and after pregnancy—Clinician's guide. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2 pp. (Effective health care program)

Annotation: This guide summarizes clinical evidence about prenatal treatment and delivery management for women with gestational diabetes. It also summarizes evidence about follow-up for the development of type 2 diabetes among women who have had gestational diabetes. The guide discusses the clinical issue, insulin and hypoglycemic medications, the timing and mode of delivery, considerations, and a resource for women.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Gestational diabetes, Hypoglycemia, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Treatment, Women's health

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2009. Medicaid: State and federal actions have been taken to improve children's access to dental services, but gaps remain. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report presents state strategies to monitor and improve access to oral health care for children enrolled in Medicaid and actions taken by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services since 2007 to improve oversight of Medicaid oral health services for children. Topics include methods to monitor the provision of services, measures to monitor access to services, statewide utilization goals, access standards for services provided under Medicaid managed care, actions to educate families on the importance of oral health care and to recruit oral health professionals, barriers that hinder state initiatives to improve access to services, and state-reported best practices for improving care.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-09-723.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Medicaid managed care, Model programs, Oral health

Alford, S. 2008. Science and success, second edition: Sex education and other programs that work to prevent teen pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 112 pp.

Annotation: This document describes 26 programs found to be effective in reducing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including those that are school-based, community-based, and clinic-based. It discusses the criteria for inclusion and major program effects.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, HIV, Model programs, Prevention, Programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Bandy T, Moore KA. 2008. What works for adolescent reproductive health: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 12 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet synthesizes findings from LINKS, the Child Trends database of experimental evaluations of social interventions for children and youth. The fact sheet focuses on programs that address adolescent reproductive health. This database includes more than 50 programs whose effects on reproductive health have been experimentally evaluated. The fact sheet identifies themes that recurr in programs that work, programs that don't work, and programs that have received mixed reviews. Much of the fact sheet consists of a table that divides programs by outcome area and then lists programs not proven to work, those found to work, and those with mixed findings. The electronic version of the report contains links to the Child Trends database so readers can see a fuller description and contact information for each program.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Evaluation, Programs, Reproductive health

Brennan Ramirez LK, Baker EA, Metzler M. 2008. Promoting health equity: A resource to help communities address social determinants of health. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 111 pp.

Annotation: This workbook is for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health to promote health and achieve health equity. The workbook discusses health equity and how to achieve it and provides case studies of initiatives and programs working to achieve health equity. Information on how to develop a social determinants of health equity initiative is provided.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Initiatives, Case studies, Community programs, Health, Model programs, Program development, Public health, Social factors

Brittle C, Bird C, Van Hoey N. 2008. Implementing systems of change to improve women's health care: National Community Centers of Excellence. Washington, DC: Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 46 pp.

Annotation: This report consists of two main sections. The first section comprises a literature review outlining current best practices in health care systems change. The second section describes the National Community Centers of Excellence in Women's Health (CCOE) program and documents how CCOEs have implemented systems change, including examples and lessons learned. CCOEs are sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health. The report concludes with an analysis of how CCOEs may serve as models for other systems change initiatives.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Literature reviews, Model programs, Women's health

Card JJ, Benner T. 2008. Model programs for adolescent sexual health: Evidence-based HIV, STI, and pregnancy prevention interventions. New York, NY: Springer, 394 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a directory of effective sexual education programs in the United States, all of which are aimed at a variety of age groups, and ethnic, cultural, and sexual orientations. Each program description contains the following: an abstract, program rationale and history, schedule, materials, a description of implementation steps, and an evaluation section. Sites of the programs include schools, community settings, and medical clinics.

Contact: Springer Publishing Company, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036, Telephone: (877) 687-7476 E-mail: contactus@springerpub.com Web Site: http://www.springerpub.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-082613824-8.

Keywords: Sexuality education, Adolescents, Cultural beliefs, Ethnic groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases

Del Grosso P, Brown A, Silva S, Henderson J, Tein N, Paulsell D. 2008. A guide to emerging strategies for promoting prevention and improving oral health care delivery in Head Start: Lessons from the Oral Health Initiative evaluation. Volume II: Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 82 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights service-delivery approaches and strategies that show promise for improving the oral-health-care-delivery system and for promoting oral health in Head Start. The report includes descriptions of each of the strategies and provides examples of how grantees implemented the practices in different program settings and with different target populations.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Head Start, Health care delivery, Health promotion, Model programs, Oral health, Service delivery systems, Young children

Isaacs JB. 2008. Impacts of early childhood programs. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families and First Focus, 29 pp.

Annotation: This set of research briefs provides policymakers with a summary of evidence on several early childhood interventions and their impact on children and families. The briefs discuss (1) state pre-kindergarten programs, (2) Head Start, (3) Early Head Start, (4) model early childhood programs (Abecedarian project, High Scope/Perry Preschool, and Chicago Child-Parent Centers), and (5) nurse home visiting. For each, the brief explains what the intervention is, what is its impact, and how impacts vary.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Early intervention programs, Head Start, Home visiting, Model programs, Oral health, Public policy, State programs, Young children

Martinez K, Van Buren E. 2008. Cultural and linguistic competence: Implementation guide. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 124 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides community examples, best practices, and information on specific tools and resources that can assist systems of care communities, partnering agencies, and organizations to build and promote cultural and linguistic competency (CLC). It is organized around six domains: governance and organization infrastructure, services and supports, planning and continuous quality improvements, collaboration, communication, and workforce development. Each domain contains descriptions of specific implementation strategies, examples of best practices in the field, internet links to important resources that can help leaders and practitioners design culturally and linguistically competent practices and policies, and performance indicators and measures that can be used to assess the outcomes of approaches used to actualize CLC.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community programs, Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Model programs, Resources for professionals, Sociocultural factors

Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. 2008. Patient-centered medical home: Building evidence and momentum—A compilation of PCMH pilot and demonstration projects. Washington, DC: Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report describes efforts across the country to build an evidence base showing that the patient-centered medical home model of care leads to cost savings, better health outcomes, and higher patient satisfaction. The report presentes a state-by state guide showing the status of medical home model pragrams, describes joint principles of the patient-centered medical home, and presents evidence on effectiveness.

Contact: Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, 601 Thirteenth Street, NW, Suite 430 North, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 417-2081 Fax: (202) 417-2082 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.pcpcc.net Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Costs, Health care delivery, Medical home, Model programs, State programs

Ray R, Gornick JC, Schmitt J. 2008. Parental leave policies in 21 countries: Assessing generosity and gender equality. Washington, DC: Center for Economic Policy and Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the major national policies of 21 high-income economies as of June 2008. The report focuses on two aspects of parental leave policies: (1) the level of support provided to parents and (2) the degree to which leave policies promote an egalitarian distribution between mothers and fathers of the time devoted to child care. The report concludes with best practices culled from the 21 national experiences.

Contact: Center for Economic and Policy Research, 1611 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 293-5380 E-mail: cepr@cepr.net Web Site: http://www.cepr.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Families, Family leave, Fathers, International programs, Model programs, Mothers, Parental leave, Public policy, Working parents

Safe Start Center. 2008. Safe Start: Promising approaches communities—Working together to help children exposed to violence. Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 40 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes 15 communities that have implemented the Safe Start Promising Approaches initiative. The purpose of the initiative is to prevent and reduce the negative consequences of children's exposure to violence, as well as to create conditions that enhance the well-being of all children and adolescents through preventive interventions. The publication outlines how each program is integrating evidence-based or promising practices as well as other interventions within its geographical, agency, and community contexts. The final section provides a brief description of evidence-based and promising practices and lists the Safe Start Promising Approaches communities that are implementing each practice.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Child welfare, Children, Community programs, Initiatives, Intervention, Model programs, Safe Start Promising Approaches, Violence prevention

Sakala C, Corry MP. 2008. Evidence-based maternity care: What it is and what it can achieve. New York, NY: Milbank Memorial Fund, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the scientific basis for maternity practice. It begins by positioning care for childbearing women and newborns within the U.S. health care system and describing performance on several maternity care quality indicators. The report then provides a framework for understanding evidence-based maternity care, including the relationship between evidence about human psychology and evidence about specific maternity practices. The report then identifies a series of practices that are either overused or underused and provides examples for improving quality of care. The report concludes with a discussion of challenges associated with reducing the evidence-practice gap and identifies policies and practice strategies that might narrow the gap. A statistical update to maternity care facts and figures is available on the web site.

Contact: Milbank Memorial Fund, 645 Madison Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10022-1095, Telephone: (212) 355-8400 Fax: (212) 355-8599 E-mail: mmf@milbank.org Web Site: http://www.milbank.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-887748-70-4.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Childbirth, Health care systems, Infant health, Pregnancy, Public policy, Reproductive health, Statistics, Women's health

Steigler K, Lever N. 2008. Summary of recognized evidence-based programs implemented by Expanded School Mental Health (ESMH) Programs. [Baltimore, MD]: University of Maryland School of Medicine, Center for School Mental Health, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report lists programs for pre-K through high school aged children by program name/ Web link, age/grade level, topics addressed, primary implementer, structure of curriculum, and the recognition each program has received as evidence-based.

Contact: Center for School Mental Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 737 West Lombard Street, Fourth Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-0980 Fax: (410) 706-0984 E-mail: csmh@psych.umaryland.edu Web Site: http://csmh.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Mental health professionals, Mental health programs, Model programs, School age children, School linked programs

Texas Dental Association. 2008. Building better oral health: A dental home for all Texans. Austin, TX: Texas Dental Association, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies issues, needs, and challenges associated with improving the oral health of Texans. Topics include the economic, medical, and social consequences of untreated oral disease; the oral health care system in Texas (including school-based and Head Start preventive oral health services); state and national comparative data on the oral health status of Texans; and oral health disparities in Texas, particularly among populations that face challenges in accessing oral health services. The report concludes with public policy recommendations to expand access to oral health care in Texas, including best practices from other states.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Adults, Children, Needs assessment, Oral health, State initiatives, Texas

Voices for America's Children. 2008. Increasing state investments in early care and education: Lessons learned from advocates and best practices. Washington, DC: Voices for America's Children for the Annie E. Casey Foundation, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on interviews with 11 member organizations within the Voices for America's Children (Voices) network, outlines lessons learned by advocates related to investing in early childhood education and child care. The goal of the report is to provide advocates with proven strategies for making progress in securing access to early learning opportunities for all children. The report provides information about why early investment matters, a summary of state successes, and pathways to success. Eleven state profiles of early childhood education strategies are provided.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Costs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Model programs, State programs

Champions for Inclusive Communities. [2007]. Evidence-based practices for coalition building. Logan, UT: Utah State University, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes recommended strategies to build and sustain community coalitions as a way to improve community-based services so families can use them easily. The document describes what community coalitions are and what they do, and how successful coalitions use a continuous quality improvement (CQI) process to guide their activities. Topics include building partnerships, developing plans, implementing actions, and measuring and monitoring.

Contact: Statewide Parent Advocacy Network, 35 Halsey Street, Newark, NJ 07102, Telephone: (973) 642-8100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 654-SPAN Fax: (973) 642-8080 E-mail: span@spannj.org Web Site: http://www.spannj.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coalitions, Community based services, Community participation, Continuous learning, Families, Planning, Program development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2007. A science-based framework for early childhood policy: Using evidence to improve outcomes in learning, behavior, and health for vulnerable children. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about research that can guide priorities for science-based early childhood policies built around common concepts (from neuroscience and developmental-behavioral research) and broadly accepted empirical findings (from four decades of program evaluation studies). The report discusses (1) helping children by strengthening their family environment, (2) serving children in out-of-home environments through early care and education, (3) multi-generational programs that combine support for vulnerable families with direct services for children, (4) effectiveness factors that cut across all program models, (5) family economics and maternal employment, and (5) recognizing the vulnerability of the young brain to environmental contamination:.The report also includes an executive summary, references, acknowledgments, and selected background readings.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early childhood education, Economic factors, Employment, Environmental factors, Families, Programs, Public policy, Research

Freudlich M. 2007. Time for reform: Investing in prevention—Keeping children safe at home. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the role that child welfare programs play in keeping children safe and helping families stay together whenever possible. The report describes the continuum of prevention and re-unification services that must be in place to (1) prevent child abuse from occuring or from re-occuring or intensifying, (2) prevent children from unnecessarily entering foster care, and (3) promote the safe and timely re-unification of children in foster care with their families when possible. The report also highlights some prevention and re-unification programs that have shown promising results, describes federal efforts to support these practices, and examines how federal foster care financing limits states' ability to providing prevention and re-unification services. Recommendations are included.

Contact: Prevent Child Abuse America, 228 South Wabash Ave., 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60604, Telephone: (312) 663-3520 Secondary Telephone: (800) 244-5373 Fax: (312) 939-8962 E-mail: mailbox@preventchildabuse.org Web Site: http://www.preventchildabuse.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child welfare agencies, Families, Financing, Foster care, Foster children, Prevention, Programs, Safety, Services, State programs

Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and University of Washington. 2007. Best practices in prevention-oriented child death review: Providing prevention-oriented, evidence-based resources for child death review teams. [Seattle, WA]: Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center,

Annotation: This Web site assists Child Death Review (CDR) team members and other public health professionals work to prevent child injury death. It examines a range of interventions designed to prevent youth injury and death due to drowning, suicide, firearms, child abuse, and motor vehicle crashes, the top causes of injury for children ages 0 to 18 living in Washington State. For each injury mechanism, interventions are identified, reviewed, and rated on the strength and quality of published evidence supporting the efficacy of the intervention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104, Telephone: (206) 744-9430 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (206) 744-9962 E-mail: hiprc@u.washington.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent death, Child abuse, Child death, Drowning, Firearms, Injury prevention, Intervention, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Unintentional injuries, Washington

Martin C. 2007. Reducing racial and ethnic disparities: A quality improvement initiative in Medicaid toolkit. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 45 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit presents promising approaches and tools for addressing disparities as well as improving the quality of care in Medicaid managed care. Topics include using data to identify and stratify health care disparities, developing patient-centered approaches to care, and collaborating with key stakeholders to reduce disparities. Case studies explore challenges encountered and lessons learned in improving birth outcomes and immunizations, and asthma and diabetes care. The resource section lists sample tools (available online) to help managed care organizations develop effective approaches to reducing disparities in care.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Ethnic factors, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health status, Managed care, Medicaid, Minority groups, Quality assurance, Racial factors

Ohio Department of Health, School and Adolescent Health, School Nursing Program. 2007. Emergency guidelines for schools (3rd ed.). Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, School and Adolescent Health, School Nursing Program, 128 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines present best practice recommendations for providing emergency care to students in Ohio schools. The guidelines are meant to serve as basic what-to-do-in-an-emergency information for school staff without nursing or medical training or when the school nurse is not available. Sections include how to use the emergency guidelines, when to call emergency medical services, emergency procedures for injury or illness, student injury report form guidelines, planning for students with special health care needs, infection control, and school-safety planning and emergency preparedness. Flow charts detail procedures for emergency situations such as injury or illness, school safety, sheltering in place, and hazardous materials. Guidelines are provided for a "to-go" bag containing vital student, staff, and building information; records; emergency procedures; critical health information and first aid supplies; and communication equipment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Council on School Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 E-mail: schoolhealth@aap.org Web Site: http://www2.aap.org/sections/schoolhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Disaster planning, Emergency medical services for children, First aid, Guidelines, Model programs, Oral health, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School injuries, School safety

Partnership for Prevention. 2007. Preventive care: A national profile on use, disparities, and health benefits. Washington, DC: Partnership for Prevention, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report is a follow-up a study conducted in 2006 that ranked 25 evidence-based clinical preventive services recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The report (1) documents the use of preventive care across the United States, (2) estimates the health benefits for the U.S. population of increasing the use of preventive services from current utilization rates to 90 percent, (3) quantifies disparities in use of preventive care by comparing use of services by racial and ethnic groups to the white, non-Hispanic population; and (4) gives special attention to cancer screenings by estimating the lives that would be saved if breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening rates increased from current rates to 90 percent among selected racial and ethnic groups. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: data sources and gaps on use of 25 clinical preventive services for general state or national populations.

Contact: Partnership for Prevention, 1015 18th Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 833-0009 Fax: (202) 833-0113 E-mail: info@prevent.org Web Site: http://www.prevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Colon cancer, Ethnic factors, Health care services, Prevention, Racial factors, Screening tests

Phillipp BL, Jean-Marie S. 2007. African American women and breastfeeding. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This background paper examines the critical relationship between breastfeeding and infant mortality among African Americans, the racial/ethnic group with the lowest rate of breastfeeding. It explores the benefits of breastfeeding and the issues associated with racial/ethnic disparities in breastfeeding, concluding with an action plan for closing the gap through promotion of breastfeeding based on education, training, awareness, support, and research. Chapter contents include background and review of related literature, factors that influence breastfeeding, promising models and practices, and recommendations and implications for policy change. The appendix contains statistical charts on breastfeeding and infant mortality rates with selected vital statistics. References conclude the paper.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Ethnic factors, Infant feeding, Infant health, Infant mortality, Model programs, Racial factors, Statistical data

Shaefer J, Bronheim S. 2007. Community engagement brings credibility to risk reduction. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, SIDS/Other Infant Death Project, 6 pp. (Promising practices for cultural and linguistic competence in addressing sudden infant death syndrome and other infant death)

Annotation: This paper provides information on how the Closing the Gap program developed a culturally competent risk-reduction program to address the high incidence of SIDS among African-American infants in Chicago, compared with white infants. The paper describes the program that was created to reduce preterm labor, premature births, and infant mortality; discusses the actions taken as a result of this program; and explains why it works. Information on the National Center for Cultural Competence is included.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Community programs, Cultural competence, Illinois, Infant mortality, Model programs, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS

Shaefer J, Bronheim S. 2007. Dialog creates effective risk reduction training: North Carolina. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, SIDS/Other Infant Death Project, 5 pp. (Promising practices for cultural and linguistic competence in addressing sudden infant death syndrome and other infant death)

Annotation: This paper provides information on how the North Carolina Back to Sleep Campaign has reinforced its messages to encompass safe sleep practices and safe sleep environments to prevent accidental infant death. The paper describes the Baby's Easy Safe Sleep Training program that was created to reach families at high risk for an infant death, discusses the actions taken as a result of this program, and explains why it works. Information on the National Center for Cultural Competence is included.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Prevention, SIDS, State programs, Cultural competence, High risk infants, Infant death, Model programs, North Carolina, Sleep position

Shaefer J, Bronheim S. 2007. With Always Right, teens get the message: New York City, NY. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, SIDS/Other Infant Death Project, 6 pp. (Promising practices for cultural and linguistic competence in addressing sudden infant death syndrome and other infant death)

Annotation: This paper provides information on the Always Right program, which educates adolescents in New York City about safe infant sleep and SIDS reduction practices. The paper describes the program, discusses the actions taken as a result of it, and explains why it works. Information on the National Center for Cultural Competence is included.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Sleep position, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Community programs, Cultural competence, Infant death, Model programs, New York, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep environment

Silva S, Steffensen J. 2007. Head Start Community Forum: Head Start and community-based oral health programs—Enhancing collaborations to improve oral health. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the Head Start oral health forum held on December 4, 2006, in Washington, DC, for the purpose of improving oral health by enhancing collaboration between Early Head Start and Head Start programs and community health centers and local health departments. Contents include an executive summary, background information, an introduction and opening remarks, plenary presentations, facilitated discussion sessions, next steps, and closing remarks. The appendix contains the forum agenda and a participant list. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Community based services, Community programs, Conferences, Early Head Start, Families, Head Start, Oral health, Parents, Pregnant women

Wise PH, Huffman LC, Brat G. 2007. A critical analysis of care coordination strategies for children with special health care needs. Stanford, A: Stanford University-UCSF Evidence-based Practice Center, 36 pp.

Annotation: This technical report examines critical issues related to health care coordination for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The report focuses on direct, empirical evaluation. This report supplements a more comprehensive report, the Evidence-Based Practice Center (EPC) report on care coordination, which is currently in progress. The present report is divided into the following chapters: (1) introduction, (2) review of analytical approaches and definitions, (3) assessment of evidence for best practices of care coordination for CSHCN, (4) evidence for the impact of managed care for CSHCN enrolled in Medicaid; and (5) summary and recommendations. References are included.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Evaluation, Managed care, Medicaid, Research, Research, Service coordination

Wooldridge J. 2007. Making health care a reality for low-income children and families. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 14 pp. (Lessons from Covering Kids and Families)

Annotation: This brief reviews evaluation findings about best practices in the State Children's Health Insurance Program and Medicaid, including information about the potential value of outreach and other types of program supports. Endnotes and references are provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Enrollment, Health care financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Program evaluation, State Children's Health Insurance Program

American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Tomorrow Partnership for Children Program. 2006. The Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program: Highlights and lessons learned from the national evaluation. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Tomorrow Partnership for Children Program, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an overview of the major findings from the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children (HTPCP) National Evaluation project conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics between 2003 and 2005. Findings are divided into the following categories: HTPCP projects, benefits of HTPCP, evaluation, program impact on child health, and sustainability. The report also provides background information and presents promising practices and projects at a glance. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community programs, Evaluation, Families, Financing, Projects

Buysse V, Wesley PW, eds. 2006. Evidence-based practice in the early childhood field. Washington, DC: Zero to Three Press, 258 pp.

Annotation: This book looks at the evidence-based movement in the early childhood field, including early childhood education, early childhood special education, early intervention, child care, infant and child mental health, developmental and clinical psychology, social work, and the medical and allied health professions, among other areas. The book is organized around three questions: (1) what is evidence-based practice, and how did it emerge?, (2) how will evidence-based practice affect the early childhood field?, and (3) what are some promising practices, strategies, and future directions for implementing evidence-based practice? The book also discusses research on the impact of evidence-based practice, the evidence-based practice movement and its effect on knowledge utilization, making the case for evidence-based policy, building and establishing the evidence base, and reflections and recommendations. Each chapter includes references. The book includes an index.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-943657-95-4.

Keywords: Child health, Clinical psychology, Developmental psychology, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Evidence-based practice, Mental health, Public policy, Social work, Special education, Young children

Children's Defense Fund, Health Division. 2006. Outreach strategies for Medicaid and SCHIP: An overview of effective strategies and activities. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 28 pp.

Annotation: This paper highlights key components of effective outreach strategies to get children enrolled in Medicaid and SCHIP and also to get them access to care once enrolled. It also examines how these strategies have been implemented in states, and the challenges of continuing to push for enrollment as states face continued financial pressures and barriers to participation are resurrected. The appendix outlines outreach activities in Texas and New York. References conclude the paper. Statistical data are provided in tables throughout the report.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Enrollment, Health care financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Outreach, State Children's Health Insurance Program

CityMatCH. 2006. CityMatCH 2005: Promising practices compendium. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 122 pp.

Annotation: This compendium includes a summary of oral presentations made at the16th Annual CityMatCH Urban Maternal and Child Health Leadership Conference held on August 20-22, 2006, in Providence, Rhode Island. For each presentation, information is provided about the presenters, presentation content area, budget, and key stakeholders. An abstract of each presentation is included. Topics include: addressing obesity through the lifespan, building partnerships for change, child health and development, dealing with disaster, infant morbidity and mortality, integrated data analysis, pre- and inter-conceptional health, reducing disparities, and adolescent pregnancy prevention. Similar information is provided about posters on promising practices and data presented at the conference. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Child development, Child health, Conferences, Infant health, Infant mortality, Leadership, MCH programs, Model programs, Obesity, Prevention, Women's health

Galinsky E. 2006. The economic benefits of high-quality early childhood programs: What makes the difference?. Washington, DC: Committee for Economic Development, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on three studies of high-quality early education programs that began in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s and have continued to the present time, the High/Scope Perry Preschool Project, the Abecedarian Project, and the Chicago Child-Partent Centers. The report reflects an effort to determine what exactly about these three early childhood programs made them so successful. The report describes each program, including goals, intervention designs, what the programs and teacher development were like, other features of the interventions, major research questions that each intervention asked, study designs, and key findings. Finally, the report addresses the questions of what each program did that has been most important in contributing to its effects and what are the benefits of targeted programs, vs. universal programs, for children most at risk. References are included.

Contact: Committee for Economic Development, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-5860 Secondary Telephone: (800) 676-7353 Fax: (202) 223-0776 Web Site: http://www.CED.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Model programs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, High risk children, Research, Young children

Guild PA, Freeman VA. 2006. Promising practices to prevent adolescent suicide: What we can learn from Florida. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 49 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on promising practices in Florida to reduce adolescent suicide. Contents include a review of the national literature and trends on adolescent suicide, a review of rates and trends for Florida adolescent suicide rates, suicide prevention activities in Florida by non-profit organizations and governmental agencies, community and school interventions, and interventions to impact the health care system. A summary and conclusion are provided as well as a chart representing the timeline of activities in the state. References are provided and the appendix provides lists of persons who provided information for the paper and task force members. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, CB# 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 966-5011 E-mail: contact@schsr.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.schsr.unc.edu Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Communities, Community programs, Florida, Health services, Intervention, Literature reviews, Public policy, Schools, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Kutash K, Duchnowski AJ, Lynn N. 2006. School-based mental health: An empirical guide for decision-makers. Tampa, FL: Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 116 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides practical information and advice for those engaged in developing and implementing effective evidence-based services in the school setting. This resource (1) describes the principal models and approaches identified in the literature from mental health and education, (2) critiques the empirical support for the approaches described, and (3) suggests how science, policy, and practice can be integrated to achieve effective school-based mental health service systems through the adoption of the public health model. References are provided. Appendices include background information on programs described in the text, information from literature reviews, rating criteria, definitions and review criteria, and possible steps in implementing a public health model.

Contact: Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3809, Telephone: (813) 974-4602 Fax: (813) 974-7633 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.fmhi.usf.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Health services delivery, Model programs, School age children, School based clinics, Service delivery systems

Overton L. 2006. Simplify, automate, and follow the leader: Lessons on expanding health coverage for children. Oakland, CA: California Healthcare Foundation, 9 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief synthesizes key lessons from successful initiatives at the state, county, and community level that are working to reduce the percentage of uninsured children in California. The brief identifies three main strategies for making such initiatives successful: (1) simplify, (2) automate, and (3) follow the leader. The brief elaborates on each of these strategies and also discusses obstacles to overcome and provides a conclusion. Brief case studies of two programs are provided as a sidebar. Endnotes are included.

Contact: California HealthCare Foundation, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 400, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 238-1040 Fax: (510) 238-1388 Web Site: http://www.chcf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Child health, Community programs, County programs, Health insurance, Initiatives, Local programs, State programs, Uninsured persons

Ramler M, Nakatsukasa-Ono, W, Loe C, Harris K. 2006. The influence of child care health consultants in promoting children’s health and well-being: A report on selected resources. Newton, MA: Healthy Child Care Consultant Network Support Center; Oakland, CA: CHT Resource Group, 41 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a synthesis of 79 published and unpublished resource documents -- evaluations, presentations, monographs, etc. -- related to health consultation to early care and education (ECE) programs, with the aim of mapping the current landscape of child care health consultant (CCHC) services and identifying CCHCs’ impact on ECE programs’ health and safety practices and child health outcomes. It includes the knowledge base needed by consultants, a model of how health consultation works, and best practices and lessons learned. A list of the documents is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care services, Consultation, Early childhood education, Literature reviews, Program evaluation

Vexler EJ, Sullentrop K. 2006. Bridging two worlds: How teen pregnancy prevention programs can better serve Latino youth. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 36 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is intended for those involved in community programs that work directly with Hispanic youth, offers information that can help reduce adolescent pregnancy rates within the Hispanic community. The publication provides demographic data about the Hispanic community, an overview of pregnancy prevention programs shown to be effective with Hispanic youth, insights from program leaders in the field, and views of Hispanic adolescents themselves. Endnotes and a list of other materials of interest from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy are included. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Hispanic Americans, Prevention, Spanish language materials, Young adults

Yannacci J, Rivard JC. 2006. Matrix of children's evidence-based interventions. Alexandria, VA: Center for Mental Health Quality and Accountability, NASMHPD Research Institute, 36 pp.

Annotation: This matrix of children's evidence-based interventions is a comprehensive list of interventions or programs for children's behavior problems and agression that have been evaluated or more rigorously tested and found to have varying degrees of evidence of effectiveness. For each intervention or program, the matrix includes a description, evidence of effectiveness, availability of technological assistance and training materials, the population and setting with which the intervention or program was tested, and sources that identified the intervention or program. Also included are an introduction to the matrix and sources used for the review.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Children, Community programs, Intervention, Mental disorders, Mental health

Vermont Child Health Improvement Program. [2005]. State guide to improving prenatal care. [Burlington, VT]: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont Department of Pediatrics, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides an outline for the need to improve prenatal care as well as the mission, goals, methodology, and leanings of the Improving Prenatal Care in Vermont (IPCV) project. The IPCV project identifies "best practice" prenatal guidelines and assists obstetric service providers in incorporating these guidelines in to their office systems. The report outlines topic areas for improvement, introduces the "Practice Toolkit", and outlines the history and issues addressed by the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program (VCHIP) project. A companion document "Practice Toolkit for Improving Prenatal Care" is provided on the Web site.

Contact: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Josephs 7, UHC Campus, One South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, Telephone: (802) 656-8210 Fax: (802) 656-8368 Web Site: http://www.med.uvm.edu/vchip Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Resources for professionals, Screening, State programs, Vermont

Brodsky KL. 2005. Best practices in specialty provider recruitment and retention: Challenges and solutions. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 34 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a study of Association of Community Affiliated Plans (ACAP) health plans conducted in 2004 to identify barriers to recruiting and retaining providers and also to identify solutions to this problem. Four plans were selected for in-depth case studies. The paper discusses (1) identifying challenges; (2) matching best practices to challenges; (3) payment practices, payment incentives, and financial assistance; (4) utilization management practices; (5) communications and provider outreach practices; (6) practices to simplify administrative burdens; and (7) enabling service practices.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Case studies, Health personnel, Managed care organizations, Medicaid managed care, Recruitment, Salaries

Brown A, Lowe B, Zimmerman B. 2005. Promising approaches and lessons learned for preventing or reducing early childhood caries: Summary of a workshop convened by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a national forum on early childhood caries (ECC) held on May 16–17, 2005, in Washington, DC, to identify common program elements using the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors' Best Practices for Oral Health Programs criteria as a framework and to develop a knowledge base of promising program approaches, practices, challenges, and lessons aimed at reducing and preventing the incidence of ECC. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) core principles of ECC prevention and disease management, (2) promising strategies and challenges of ECC programs, and (3) key considerations in developing and sustaining ECC initiatives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Conferences, Disease prevention, Early childhood caries, Families, Model programs, National initiatives, Oral health, Parents, Program descriptions, State programs, Young children

CityMatCH. 2005. For all it's worth: Leading with values and vision—Promising practices: 15th Annual CityMatCH Urban Maternal and Child Health Leadership Conference. [Omaha, NE]: CityMatCH, 101 pp.

Annotation: This publication is a compilation of materials from 15th Annual City MatCH Urban Maternal and Child Health Leadership Conference held on September 10-13, 2005, in Ft. Worth, Texas. Materials cover adolescent pregnancy, racial and ethnic disparities, preconception health, obesity, child development and prevention, child health, prenatal care, and other related topics. The materials are divided into the following categories: (1) oral presentations, (2) promising practice posters, (3) daTA Institute Team's posters, and (4) additional promising practices.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Child development, Child health, Community programs, Conference proceedings, Ethnic factors, Leadership, Model programs, Obesity, Prenatal care, Prevention, Racial factors, Urban MCH programs

Healthy Teen Network. 2005. Replicating success: One program at a time. Washington, DC: Healthy Teen Network, 18 pp.

Annotation: This publication focuses on the methodology that has been developed in recent years to replicate community-based programs that effectively address the complex issues associated with adolescent parents and adolescent pregnancy prevention in the United States. The publication showcases two programs in particular that have been successfully replicated in neighborhoods across the United States, Plain Talk and the Nurse-Family Partnership. The publication concludes with answers to frequently asked questions from community organizers who are interested in replicating an established program in their own communities and are prepared to take the next step. References and acknowledgments are included.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Community programs, Model programs, Prevention

Kent HM, Fitzgerald MT. 2005. Toward women's health: A compendium of promising practices to improve urban women's health. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 11 pp.

Annotation: This compendium is the first of four issues describing promising practices that City MatCH agencies have employed to improve the health of women in their communities. The issue begins with a description of lessons learned through the process of putting together the compendium, a publication evaluation form, and a CityMatCH publication order form. A table of contents for each of the four issues is then provided, followed by content of the first issue, in which six promising practices are described. For each promising practices, the following questions are answered: (1) what is the promising practice, (2) what are the key strategies and activities of this promising practice, (3) what specific, measurable results have evaluations shown have been achieved, (4) what are the costs associated with this project, (5) what else would you like your colleagues to know about this initiative, (6) what advice do you have for your colleagues wishing to engage in a similar effort, (7) what is the role of the health department in this initiative, and (8) whom can we contact for additional information about this initiative? [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Costs, Initiatives, Urban health, Urban population, Women's health

Knitzer J, Lefkowitz J. 2005. Resources to promote social and emotional health and school readiness in young children: A community guide. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 72 pp., exec. summ. (10 pp.).

Annotation: This guide provides information about resources and strategies that families, child care providers, teachers, and others who come into contact with young children every day can use to help children develop the social and emotional skills they need to succeed in school. Some of the resources and strategies focus on infants and toddlers, others on young children in general, and still others on high-risk young children. All the resources been used in low-income communities and are designed to be embedded in a larger community effort to promote resilience and build on the strengths that exist in families and communities.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, High risk children, Low income groups, Resource materials, School readiness

Kushner K, Ange E. 2005. Women's health: Successes and challenges in prevention and promotion. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation, 13 pp. (Action brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of a forum held December 14, 2004 to share information on policies and programs on women's health at the federal and state level; research and evidence-based efforts; and successful prevention and treatment options. The first section of the brief includes overview of women's health in public sector initiatives such as Healthy People 2010, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and women's health, smoking prevention and cessation. Selected health plan initiatives are outlined including Anthem's Healthy Woman program, Highmark's array of programs, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, and Wellpoint. A chart of additional sources for more information is provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Conferences, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Initiatives, Program descriptions, Women's health

National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality. 2005. Expanding perspectives: Improving cultural competency in children's health care. Cambridge, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality , 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes an initiative to develop practical strategies that healthcare organizations, primary care practices in particular, could use to become better able to care for diverse populations, including academic literature review, a formal expert process, and pilot testing to assess the feasibility of the recommended strategies and measures. The report discusses the methods used, the conceptual framework, community resources, the health care system and organization, family and self-management support, decision support, delivery system design, the clinical information system, cultural competence measures, and a pilot test summary. Sections list change concepts, potential strategies, obstacles, and strategies that are successful. Case studies are included, along with a list of resources and a list of culturally and linguistically appropriate service (CLAS) standards.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural beliefs, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Language barriers

Shartzer A, Ange E, Finan T. 2005. Children's mental health: New developments in policy and programs. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management, 16 pp. (Action brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes information from a forum funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau held in Washington, DC in May, 2004 at which participants shared information on new policies at the federal and state levels as well as on programs, research, and evidence-based efforts, and successful prevention and treatment options for children's mental health needs. Summaries of the opening presentations are provided, along with discussion of various case studies, a review of health plan and provider initiatives, and programs and strategies for prevention and treatment. Initiatives include Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health, best practices in autism spectrum disorders and depression, behavioral case management, and Offspring Depression Prevention Program. Other programs and topics described include improving primary care services for children with ADHD, the Challenging Horizons Program (a school-based mental health program), and adolescent depression and the Columbia University TeenScreen Program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Case studies, Child mental health, Community programs, Conferences, Depression, Federal programs, Initiatives, Mental health services, Program descriptions, Psychosocial development, State programs

Task Force on Community Preventive Services, Zaza S, Briss PA, Harris KW, eds. 2005. The guide to community preventive services: What works to promote health?. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 506 pp.

Annotation: This guide is a resource to help readers select interventions to improve health and prevent disease in their state, community, community organization, business, health care organization, or school. The guide reviews evidence about interventions designed to improve health across a wide range of topics, including tobacco use, physical inactivity, and violence; specific health conditions such as cancer, diabetes, vaccine-preventable diseases, and motor vehicle injuries; and broad social determinants of health such as education, housing, and access to health care. For each topic, interventions that promise to improve important health outcomes are reviewed. The guide answers three questions: (1) what has worked for others, and how well?, (2) how can I select among interventions with proven effectiveness?, and (3) what might this intervention cost, and what am I likely to achieve through my investment? Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the guide. The guide includes one appendix -- a comprehensive list of all findings included in the guide, presented in alphabetical order by topic. A glossary, an index, and references are included, as well.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us $55.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-515108-9.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cancer, Communities, Costs, Diabetes, Disease prevention, Education, Evaluation, Health promotion, Housing, Injury prevention, Interventions, Motor vehicle injuries, Physical activity, Social factors, Tobacco use, Violence

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2005. Childhood obesity: Most experts identified physical activity and the use of best practices as key to successful programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 76 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on program strategies and elements experts have identified as likely to contribute to success in addressing childhood obesity as well as on how these strategies and elements have been implemented. The report (1) describes the key strategies indentified by experts as most important to include in programs to prevent or reduce childhood obesity, (2) provides examples of how selected programs implemented the key strategies indentified and challenges these programs faced, (3) describes the program elements identified by experts as most important to include in programs to prevent or reduce childhood obesity, as well as outcome measures indentified as important, and (4) provides examples of how selected programs implemented key elements identified and the challenges these programs faced, as well as examples of possible roles for the federal government. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report is presented as a PowerPoint presentation.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-06-127R.

Keywords: Child health, Obesity, Prevention, Programs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2005. Promising approaches and lessons learned for preventing or reducing early childhood caries. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 v.

Annotation: This notebook contains participant materials from an early childhood caries (ECC) conference held on May 16-17, 2005, in Washington, DC. The conference focused on (1) identifying common program elements from each of the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors Proven and Promising Best Practices for State and Community Oral Health Programs criteria that are necessary to prevent or reduce the incidence of ECC and (2) creating a knowledge base to share with stakeholders that highlights promising program approaches for preventing and reducing the incidence of ECC. Notebook contents include the conference agenda; program overviews; and program descriptions from 12 national, state, and local programs. Background materials include a copy of the American Academy of Pediatrics policy on ECC, a press release from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, a statement from the American Dental Association on ECC, and materials from the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. Also included in the notebook are a brochure from Delta Dental and the Washington Dental Service Foundation on oral health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Community programs, Conferences, Disease prevention, Early childhood caries, Model programs, National initiatives, Oral health, Program descriptions, State programs

CityMatCH. [2004]. Expedition 2004: Exploring the Boundaries of Urban MCH—Promising practices from the field: CityMatCH annual urban maternal and child health leadership conference. [Omaha, NE]: CityMatCH, 139 pp.

Annotation: This document includes abstracts accepted for the CityMatCH conference, Expedition 2004: Exploring the Boundaries of Urban MCH. The abstracts accepted for the conference reflect innovative activities, strategies, or lessons learned that have strengthened the conference participant's capacity to serve children and families. Abstracts for which oral presentations are given are grouped into the following categories: (1) advocacy: strategies for local leaders to advance MCH policy and programs, (2) addressing the epidemic of overweight children: practice and policy, (3) assuring access for women and children, (4) creating healthier communities for our children, (5) focusing on preconception health: improving morbidity and mortality, (6) inside or outside our circle:do mental health concerns affect our outcomes?, (7) integrating urban women's health in local health departments, and (8) mentoring fathers, strengthening families. The document also includes a poster section, which includes abstracts that best address the specific review criteria, and a publication only section, which includes abstracts that are published but not presented.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Child health, Children, Communities, Community programs, Conferences, Families, Fathers, Leadership, MCH programs, Mental health, Morbidity, Mortality, Obesity, Preconception care, Public policy, Urban areas, Women's health

Birtwhistle A, Lefkovitz B, Meehan D, Needham H, Paul A. 2004. Exemplary practices in adolescent development. [Sacramento, CA]: Sierra Health Foundation, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report is a summary of studies collected and examined as part of a research effort to examine evidence-based practices that appear promising in positively affecting adolescent health and development for young people ages 10-15. The report is divided into two sections: (1) exemplary practices of issue-focused efforts and (2) exemplary practices of strengths-based efforts. A summary of these approaches and findings from the research are presented. The bulk of the report consists of attachments presented in tabular form. Attachment A describes child development stages of middle childhood and adolescence. The rest of the attachments are literature reviews divided into several categories. Endnotes are included, as well.

Contact: Sierra Health Foundation, 1321 Garden Highway, Sacramento, CA 95833, Telephone: (916) 922-4755 Fax: (916) 922-4024 E-mail: info@sierrahealth.org Web Site: http://www.sierrahealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Literature reviews, Research

Bradley EH, Webster TR, Baker D, Schlesinger M, Inouye SK, Barth MC, Lapane KL, Lipson D, Stone R, Koren MJ. 2004. Translating research into practice: Speeding the adoption of innovative health care programs. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 11 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on a study conducted to learn key factors influencing the diffusion and adoption of evidence-based innovations in health care. The authors conducted case studies of four varied clinical programs. The brief, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following main sections: (1) background, (2) a conceptual framework and lessons learned about diffusing innovations in the clinical setting, and (3) summary. The brief concludes with references and an about the authors section.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Case studies, Diffusion of innovation, Health care, Medical research, Programs

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2004. Mental health of children and youth and the role of public health professionals. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 20 pp. (A Center brief report)

Annotation: This report highlights the following: (1) why child and adolescent mental health is a major public health concern, (2) the importance of viewing causal factors from a broad perspective, (3) a continuum of intervention strategies for addressing the range of problems, (4) some considerations related to prevention, (5) screening for mental health problems, and (6) the value of connecting with schools. The report contains a bibliography and an appendix on what schools do related to mental health, including a list of resources on evidence-based strategies for strengthening school support for students. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Community programs, Intervention, Model programs, Prevention, Public health, School health programs, Schools, Screening

Guild PA, Freeman VA, Shanahan E. 2004. Promising practices to prevent adolescent suicide: What we can learn from New Jersey. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on promising practices to prevent adolescent suicide, highlights documented interventions that have shown the most promise for school programs, communities, and health care partners in New Jersey, which has had the lowest state-level adolescent suicide rate for over a decade. An in-depth examination of New Jersey's policies and practices targeting teen suicide, as well as a literature review of effective suicide-prevention strategies nationwide, are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, CB# 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 966-5011 E-mail: contact@schsr.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.schsr.unc.edu Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Communities, Community programs, Health services, Intervention, Literature reviews, New Jersey, Public policy, Schools, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Health Systems Research, Steffensen J. 2004. Enhancing partnerships for Head Start and oral health: Regional forums synthesis report. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the overarching issues identified and common strategies recommended to the national and regional offices by participants in five regional forums held between 2001 and 2004 in Dallas, Kansas City, Denver, San Francisco, and Seattle. Issues identified include best practices; education; workforce development; insurance and access to oral health care; coordination, collaboration, and leadership; and funding. Strategies are offered for each of the issues identified. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Conferences, Dental care, Early Head Start, Head Start, Health insurance, Oral health, Professional education, Strategic plans, Young children

Koppelman J. 2004. The provider system for children's mental health: Workforce capacity and effective treatment. Washington, DC: National Health Policy Forum, 18 pp. (NHPF Issue brief; no. 801)

Annotation: This issue brief examines two issues: ensuring that the supply of mental health professionals who serve children is adequate and that the care delivered is effective. The brief describes the shortage of qualified professionals to address children's mental disorders, as well as the possible causes of the shortage and how managed care, to a certain extent, drives practice patterns. The brief also discusses how to decide which health professionals are most qualified to deliver certain types of care. In addition, the brief introduces what is known about evidence-based care in children's mental health, the extent to which it is being taught and practiced, the extent to which health plans are adopting such practices, and the effect the strategies may have on the makeup of the children's mental health professional field. The brief includes endnotes.

Contact: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 2131 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 872-1390 E-mail: nhpf@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.nhpf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Health care delivery, Managed care, Mental disorders, Mental health professionals, Work force

McLaughlin JE, Burstein NR, Tao F, Fox MK. 2004. Breastfeeding intervention design study. Alexandria, VA: Office of Analysis, Nutrition, and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 87 pp. (Special nutrition programs report no. WIC-04-BFDSN)

Annotation: This report focuses on a breastfeeding intervention study, the purposes of which were to (1) identify interventions to increase the incidence, duration, and intensity of breastfeeding among women participating in WIC and (2) design an evaluation plan to examine the implementation and effectiveness of these interventions. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into two main parts: Part I -- evaluation design and analysis plan and Part II -- review of literature on breastfeeding promotion and support interventions. Part I is divided into the following chapters: (1) factors to consider in defining peer counseling interventions for evaluation, (2) alternative random assignment research designs, (3) site selection, sample size, and statistical power, (4) implementation study, (5) impact study, (6) data collection measures, and (7) data collection procedures. References are included. The section includes one appendix: a list of expert panel members. Part II is divided into the following chapters: (1) introduction, (2) literature review methods, (3) results of the literature review, and (4) summary and conclusions. A bibliogragraphy is included. The section includes two appendices: (1) summary of information for reviewed interventions and (2) profiles of innovative and successful interventions.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low income groups, Model programs, Program evaluation, WIC

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2004. Best practices for promoting booster seat use: A how-to community guide based on community demonstration projects. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 40 pp.

Annotation: This how-to guide, which synthesizes the research findings and lessons learned from demonstration projects funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) during fiscal year 2001, is geared toward child passenger safety and injury control advocates. The guide, which focuses on booster seat use, includes the following main sections: (1) promoting booster seat use, (2) know the facts about booster seats, (3) learn from others -- challenges and lessons learned, (4) reach out to all populations, (5) state and national resources, (6) additional reading, and (7) appendices. The two appendices include a description of the major types of booster seats and lists of state highway safety offices and NHTSA regional offices.

Contact: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., West Building, Washington, DC 20590, Telephone: (888) 327-4236 Secondary Telephone: (800)424-9153 Web Site: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DOT HS 809 693.

Keywords: Advocacy, Car seats, Child safety, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Occupant protection

Rosenthal J, Chang D. 2004. State approaches to childhood obesity: A snapshot of promising practices and lessons learned. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report provides highlights of innovative approaches of state agencies and their partners to address childhood obesity, focusing on community, school, and health care settings; public and policymaker education; disparities; and research and surveillance. Topics covered include (1) creating successful partnerships, (2) raising public and policymaker awareness, (3) implementing healthy community design and smart growth strategies, (4) implementing food and physical activity policies and standards in schools, (5) increasing access and availability of obesity treatment, (6) addressing health disparities, (7) demonstrating program effectiveness and sustainability, and (8) financing and sustaining obesity prevention initiatives. The report also offers conclusions. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communities, Community programs, Economic factors, Education, Financing, Food, Health care, Initiatives, Model programs, Obesity, Physical activity, Population surveillance, Prevention, Racial factors, Research, Schools, State agencies, State programs

Thompson L, Uyeda K. 2004. Family support: Fostering leadership and partnership to improve access and quality. Los Angeles, CA: National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy, 30 pp. (Building state early childhood comprehensive systems; no. 14)

Annotation: This paper addresses the family support component of the State Early Childhood Comprehensive System (SECCS) Initiative, which provides planning and implementation grants to state and territory maternal and child health agencies for the purpose of coordinating, integrating, improving access to and improving the quality of health, early childhood education, and family support services for young children and their families. The paper provides a framework for thinking about family support in terms of its philosophy, relevance to the early childhood field, strategies, and delivery platforms. The paper also summarizes what is known about the effectiveness of and funding mechanisms for key family support strategies. Recommendations are offered for how SECCS initiatives can play a role in developing partnerships and leadership that enhance access, integration, and quality of family support services and help link these efforts with the other components of the SECCS Initiative. Five appendices include Web resources, home visiting best practices, and descriptions of model programs. References are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Early childhood education, Families, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health agencies, Leadership, Service coordination, Service integration, State programs, Young children

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2004. Child health research findings. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 32 pp. (Program brief)

Annotation: This program brief summarizes findings from recent Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-supported projects focused on children and adolescents. It is designed to give practitioners and policymakers the tools and knowledge they need to improve child health outcomes; enhance children's quality of care; address access, use, and costs; and translate evidence-based research into improved clinical practice. Information is organized into categories such as acute care and injuries, adolescent health, asthma and respiratory illness, and mental health.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 04-P011.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child health, Children, Costs, Evidence based medicine, Health care utilization, Research

Zero to Three Policy Center. 2004. Infant and early childhood mental health: Promoting healthy social and emotional development. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three Policy Center, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides summary and detailed policy recommendations for promoting healthy social and emotional development in infancy and early childhood. The detailed recommendations includes a summary of relevant research findings as well as a promising strategy related to each recommendation. The fact sheet also explains why policymakers should pay attention to infant and early childhood mental health and provides a list of fast facts.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Infant development, Infant health, Mental health, Model programs, Public policy

Thomas D, Leicht C, Hughes C, Madigan A, Dowell K. [2003]. Emerging practices in the prevention of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U. S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, ca. 120 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies best practices in the field of child abuse prevention. The report begins with an overview of maltreatment, which briefly describes existing national models of prevention, and is following by the results of the national nomination process for effective and innovative child maltreatment prevention programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the limits of existing knowledge about the effectiveness of prevention, the need to expand efforts to understand the performance and impact of prevention programs, and observations about this process and recommendations for next steps. References are included. The report contains two appendices: a list of effective and innovative prevention programs and a list of resources and organizations.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Community programs, Maltreated children, Model programs, Prevention programs

All Kids Count. 2003. Integration of newborn screening and genetic service systems with other maternal and child health systems: A sourcebook for planning and development. Decatur, GA: All Kids Count, 100 pp.

Annotation: This sourcebook presents the results of a study to identify and describe best practices in integrating newborn screening information with other early childhood health information and their supporting systems among Special Projects of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) planning grantees. The sourcebook describes key elements for planning and implementing integration efforts and what are considered best practices in their implementation. It includes two in-depth case studies that describe how the key elements were implemented through two very different approaches and provides lessons learned. A bibliography and additional resources are included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: All Kids Count, 750 Commerce Drive, Suite 400***DEFUNCT***, Decatur, GA 30030, Telephone: (800) 874-4338 Fax: (800) 765-7520 E-mail: info@allkidscount.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Integrated information systems, Medical records, Model programs, Neonatal screening, Planning, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2003. Reaching the children: The relationship between Title V and Part C. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 16 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief (1) examines partnerships in 20 states between Title V of the Social Security Act and Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that address the health needs of children with disabilities, (2) outlines models of and barriers to collaboration, and (3) provides recommendations to Congress and the federal government to support this collaboration. The brief provides background, describes the survey methods used, discusses best practices, and offers recommendations to state Title V and Part C programs and for the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the Department of Education, and Congress. Topics include an overview of the Title V and Part C programs, a description of program eligibility criteria, identification of eligible children, the importance of collaboration between the programs, care and service coordination, the medical home, provider availability, training and recruitment, family involvement, quality assurance, program funding, and financing. The brief includes one appendix: Action Plan for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and Their Families: From the President's New Freedom Initiative.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Early intervention, Eligibility, Federal programs, Individualized education programs, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C, Service coordination, Social Security Act, Title V, State programs, State programs

Epstein S. 2003. Shared responsibilities: Developing a quality assurance system for children with special health care needs in managed care—Final report. Boston, MA: New England SERVE, 64 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a quality improvement model for health plans including methods for identifying children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and strategies for collaborating with families, providers, and Title V programs in six New England states. The tools and resources developed for health plans include a set of measures for assessing health plan capacity and performance for CSHCN, and a range of strategies and best practices for improving the quality of managed care for this population. Report sections include goals and objectives; project methodology, evaluation, and results/outcomes (positive and negative); a list of publications/products; dissemination/utilization of results, a discussion of future plans and follow-up; and support and resources needed to replicate the project. Appendices include the toolkit, a list of leadership team participants, printed presentation slides, and the agenda from the November 1, 2002 leadership team meeting. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered services, Final reports, Health care delivery, Health care systems, MCH research, Managed care, Needs assessment, New England, Quality assurance, Title V programs

Hoover J, Stenhjem P. 2003. Bullying and teasing of youth with disabilities: Creating positive school environments for effective inclusion. Minneapolis, MN: National Center on Secondary Education and Transition, 6 pp. (Issue brief: Examining current challenges in secondary education and transition; v. 2, no. 3)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses the issue of bullying, harassment, and teasing in schools, with an emphasis on youth with disabilities, and describes two exemplary, comprehensive whole-school antibullying programs: (1) Dan Olweus's Intervention Program and (2) the Second Step Program. The brief concludes with additional resources on bullying and a list of references.

Contact: National Center on Secondary Education and Transition, University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration, 6 Pattee Hall, 150 Pillsbury Drive, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, Telephone: (612) 624-2097 Fax: (612) 624-9344 E-mail: ncset@umn.edu Web Site: http://www.ncset.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Bullying, Community programs, Prevention programs, School violence

Partee GL. 2003. Lessons learned about effective policies and practices for out-of-school-time programming. Washington, DC: American Youth Policy Forum, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report shares the stories and challenges behind the many policies and practices that communities have developed to support out-of-school-time (OST) programming. The report includes observations from school-based programs for elementary and high-school students as well as those from community settings for older out-of-school adolescents. The report also includes insights from field visits to community schools and beacon programs in elementary, middle, and high schools in New York City, Boston, Denver, Kansas City, and San Francisco. Chapter 1 of the report summarizes insights and major lessons learned. Chapter 2 provides an overview of the issues. Chapter 3 contains descriptions of two OST school-based models. Chapter 4 describes programs for older adolescents.

Contact: American Youth Policy Forum, 1836 Jefferson Place, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-2505, Telephone: (202) 775-9731 Fax: (207) 775-9733 E-mail: aypf@aypf.org Web Site: http://www.aypf.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-887031-83-9.

Keywords: Adolescents, After school programs, Children, Communities, Elementary school, High school, Middle school, Model programs, Out of school youth, Schools, Students

Prevent Child Abuse America. 2003. Healthy Families America: State systems development guide. Chicago, IL: Prevent Child Abuse America, 81 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to provide a clearinghouse of information and innovation from the Healthy Families America leadership at the state level and Prevent Child Abuse America national staff in order to support and grow the program across the country. It its CD-ROM form, this guide connects the user through links and PDF files to a variety of tools and resources that have been created to aid state systems development. In addition, the guide contains a variety of case studies that illustrate the best practices in home visitation that are evolving across the country. The guide covers the following topics: (1) administration/governance, (2) advocacy and public policy, (3) collaboration, (4) communication, (5) community planning and site development, (6) continuous quality improvement and quality assurance, (7) evaluation, (8) funding, (9) public relations and marketing, (10) strategic planning, and (11) training and technical assistance. The guide includes two appendices: (1) a compilation of resources on all state system components and (2) supporting documents. The guide also includes a conclusion and credits.

Contact: Prevent Child Abuse America, 228 South Wabash Ave., 10th Floor, Chicago, IL 60604, Telephone: (312) 663-3520 Secondary Telephone: (800) 244-5373 Fax: (312) 939-8962 E-mail: mailbox@preventchildabuse.org Web Site: http://www.preventchildabuse.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Advocacy, Case studies, Child abuse, Child health, Collaboration, Communication, Community programs, Families, Funding, Healthy Families America, Home visiting, Model programs, National programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Public policy, Public relations, Service delivery systems, State programs, Strategic plans, Technical assistance, Training

Roberts C, Longhi D. 2003. Implementing science based prevention: The experiences of eighteen communities and progress towards inter-agency coordination to reduce alcohol and substance abuse among adolescents—Evaluation report for the Washington state incentive grant (July 1998-July 2002). Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, 2 v.

Annotation: This report is the last of a series of evaluation reports on the State Incentive Grant processes and activities in Washington State from mid-1998 through early 2002, which were aimed at promoting prevention system changes among state agencies and implementing more evidence-based prevention programs. The report is based on more detailed findings presented in the earlier progress reports. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into three major sections. Section 1 discusses state-level findings on system improvements and remaining barriers. Section 2 discusses community-level findings on changes in processes, the implementation of processes to guide the community leaders and providers by providing ongoing evaluation and monitoring data, and the results of the program monitoring -- outcome changes for program participants. Section 3 discusses the implications of the changes that have been made and summarizes barriers and problems in service integration that remain to be solved. Some information is presented in tables throughout the report. Nine appendices, published in a second document, include evaluation methods, a collaborative needs assessment evaluation report, and other relevant information.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Barriers, Community programs, Grants, Health care services, Health personnel, Interagency cooperation, Monitoring, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, State programs, Substance abuse, Washington

University of Cincinnati, Evaluation Services Center. 2003. Oral health for Ohio Head Start children: Compendium of promising approaches. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Oral Health Services, 14 pp.

Annotation: This compendium highlights the structure of Ohio oral health partnerships and collaborations, operational challenges, and elements worthy of replication within Head Start programs. Topics include systematic collaboration in rural Early Head Start and Head Start (EHS/HS) programs, community oral health planning in urban EHS/HS programs, mass screenings, working with universities and training programs, promotion and incentive strategies, comprehensive approaches for EHS programs, mobile services, and education and prevention.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: State initiatives, Case studies, Children, Collaboration, Community programs, Early Head Start, Head Start, Infants, Ohio, Oral health, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Research, Surveys

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch. 2000–2014. Reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to reduce tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure in the community. Topics include comprehensive tobacco control programs, incentives and competitions to increase smoking cessation among workers, increasing the unit price for tobacco products, mass-reach health communication, mobile phone-based cessation, quitline, reducing out-of-pocket costs for eivdence-based cessation programs, smoke-free policies, and community mobilization to restrict minors' access to tobacco products. Presentations and promotional materials are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community participation, Disease prevention, Environmental exposure, Legislation, Policy development, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation, Tobacco, Young adults

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 1997–. National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration,

Annotation: This evidence-based repository and review system is designed to provide the public with reliable information about mental health and substance abuse interventions. All interventions in the registry have met minimum requirements for review and the programs' effects on individual outcomes have been independently rated by certified reviewers. Users can search for interventions by selecting specific criteria including keyword, program type, age, outcome category, race/ethnicity, special populations, gender, geographic location, setting, implementation/dissemination, and/or outcome rating. Links related to planning, evaluating, implementing, and sustaining evidence-based programs and other evidence-based repositories are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Programs, Registries, Resource materials, Substance abuse prevention

CityMatCH. CityMatCH conference. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Community Preventive Services Task Force. The guide to community preventive services: What works to promote health. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch,

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to improve health and prevent disease in the community. Topics include adolescent health, alcohol, asthma, birth defects, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, emergency preparedness, health communication, health equity, HIV/AIDS and other STIs, pregnancy, mental health, motor vehicle injury, nutrition, obesity, oral health, physical activity, social environment, tobacco, vaccination, violence, and worksite. Promotional materials and presentations are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cancer, Communities, Community programs, Costs, Diabetes, Disease prevention, Education, Evaluation, Health promotion, Housing, Injury prevention, Interventions, Model programs, Motor vehicle injuries, Physical activity, Social factors, Tobacco use, Violence

National Association of County and City Health Officials . Model practices. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials ,

Annotation: This website provides information about programs, resources, and tools to support effective collaboration between local health departments and their community partners to address local public health concerns. It includes a database containing best practices on maternal and child health and other public health areas. The database can be searched by state, type, year, and category. A step-by-step video on the database review features is included.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Databases, Local programs, Model programs, Multimedia, Public health programs

National Center for Cultural Competence. Promising practices. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence,

Annotation: This web page disseminates information on culturally and linguistically competent values, attitudes, policy, structures and practices that are both promising and/or evidence-based. Topics covered include children and youth with special health care needs, sudden infant death, bridging the cultural divide with cultural brokers, substance abuse and mental health services, and medical homes,

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Model programs

U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA's nutrition evidence library. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion,

Annotation: This website provides findings from evidence-based systematic reviews to evaluate scientific evidence to answer a precise question or series of questions on the topic of nutrition. Topics include specific types of foods, food safety, health concerns of types of foods, and foods for specific populations.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Nutrition

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . Evidence-based programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health,

Annotation: This database contains program models on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) List of Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Models, a listing of programs with impacts on adolescent pregnancies or births, sexually transmitted infections, or sexual activity. The database can be searched by program name, program type, evaluation setting, intervention length, age, race and ethnicity, outcomes affected, and study rating. Background on the program review process, review protocols, lists of programs, and FAQs are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Databases, Federal initiatives, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.