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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Healthy Schools Campaign. 2015. Addressing the health-related causes of chronic absenteeism: A toolkit for action. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, multiple items.

Annotation: This document focuses on preparing educators—particularly school district decision-makers—with knowledge and practical guidance for creating meaningful change to address health-related chronic absenteeism. Topics include background on chronic absenteeism and student health; identifying community health needs and data sources; and case studies, best practices, and proven school-based interventions to address the health conditions shown to have an especially significant impact on chronic absenteeism. Focus areas are asthma, oral health, behavioral health, food insecurity and acute illness. Additional topics include building effective partnerships and capacity to support student health.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Acute care, Asthma, Collaboration, Community action, Disease management, Health care delivery, Hunger, Mental health, Oral health, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School age children, School based management, School districts, Schools, Students, Sustainability

Goldman N, Sheward R, Ettinger de Cuba S, Black MM, Sandel M, Cook J, Coleman S. 2014. The hunger vital sign: A new standard of care for preventive health. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Policy action brief)

Gundersen C, Ziliak JP. 2014. Childhood food insecurity in the U.S.: Trends, causes, and policy options. Princeton, NJ: Future of Children, 20 pp. (Research report; Fall 2014.)

Hickson M, Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Donofrio G, Cook J. 2013. Too hungry to learn: Food insecurity and school readiness: Part I of II. Boston, MA: Boston Medical Center, Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is the first in a two-part series, provides information about food insecurity and school readiness. The brief defines food insecurity, low food security, and very low food security and discusses how food insecurity is harmful to children's health and development, how food insecurity during early childhood affects children later on, how federal nutrition programs can help improve school readiness by counteracting food insecurity, and the effect of childhood food insecurity on academic and economic outcomes.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Educational attainment, Hunger, Low income groups, Prevention, Programs, School readiness, Young children

Hickson M, Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Donofrio G, Cook J. 2013. Feeding our human capital: Food insecurity and tomorrow's workforce—Part II of II. Boston, MA: Boston Medical Center, Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is the second in a two-part series, provides information about food insecurity among children and the work force of the future. The brief defines food insecurity and human capital and discusses problems associated with childhood food insecurity, how food insecurity is related to a child's chances of graduating from high school, the effects of failing to graduate from high school, how childhood food insecurity affects health in adulthood, costs of food insecurity to society, and how early childhood development programs and nutritional interventions can serve as an investment in human capital that strengthens the work force of the future.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adult health, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Educational attainment, Employment, Graduation, Hunger, Intervention, Low income groups, Nutrition, Prevention, Programs, School readiness, Work force, Young children

Mabli J, Ohls J, Dragoset L, Castner L, Santos B. 2013. Measuring the effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation on food security. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 65 pp. (Nutrition assistance program report)

Annotation: This report presents findings of a survey of the Supplemental Food and Nutrition Program (SNAP), which provides nutrition-assistance benefits to individuals and families with low incomes. The purpose of the survey, which was conducted between October 2011 and September 2012, was to assess the effect of SNAP on food security and food spending in the post-2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act environment of higher SNAP allotments. The report assesses how household food security and food expenditures vary with SNAP participating and discusses how the relationship between SNAP and food security and between SNAP and food expenditures vary by key household characteristics and circumstances and what factors distinguish between food secure and food insecure SNAP households with children.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, FInancing, Families, Food, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Prevention, Program evaluation, Statistical data, Supplemental food programs, Surveys

Levin M, Neuberger Z. 2013. Community eligibility: Making high-poverty schools hunger free. Washington, DC: Food Action and Research Center, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 38 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information on the concept of community eligibility in making it easier for low-income children in high-poverty schools to get free meals. It describes how community eligibility works, presents data on its impact, and lists resources on best practices for implementing the option.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Children, Community role, Eligibility determination, Hunger, Low income groups, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Kirkendall N, House C, Citro C, Committee on National Statistics, Food and Nutrition Board. 2013. Research opportunities concerning the causes and consequences of child food insecurity and hunger: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 194 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the adequacy of current knowledge, identifies substantial research gaps, and considers data availability of economic, health, social, cultural, demographic, and other factors that contribute to childhood hunger or food insecurity. It also considers the geographic distribution of childhood hunger and food insecurity; the extent to which existing federal assistance programs reduce childhood hunger and food insecurity; childhood hunger and food insecurity persistence, and the extent to which it is due to gaps in program coverage; and the inability of potential participants to access programs, or the insufficiency of program benefits or services.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-309-29284-9.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Economic factors, Federal programs, Food consumption, Geographic factors, Hunger, Regional factors, Statistical data

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2012. Making the connection: Linking policies that prevent hunger and childhood obesity. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 7 pp. (Making the connection)

Annotation: This brief provides strategies to help policy makers prevent hunger and childhood obesity within the communities they serve. It discusses the link between food insecurity and obesity; disparities based on income, race, and ethnicity; and environmental factors that contribute to hunger, poor nutrition, and obesity. Policy strategies outlined in the brief include: (1) establishing healthy food financing initiatives to increase access to nutritious foods; (2) supporting farm-to-institution, farm-to-school and school garden programs; (3) increasing free and reduced-price school meals; and (4) partnering with the private sector to increase the value of federal nutrition assistance benefits for healthful foods through double-coupon initiatives.

Contact: Leadership for Healthy Communities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5112 E-mail: info@leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Web Site: http://www.leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Hunger, Obesity, Policy development, Prevention

Keith-Jennings B. 2012. SNAP plays a critical role in helping children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly the Food Stamp Program, provides benefits that help nearly one in three children in the United States maintain a nutritionally adequate diet. It describes the size and scope of SNAP and the ways in which children benefit from the program. According to the report, SNAP has been shown to reduce levels of poverty, increase food security, and improve help outcomes for children. Estimated program costs are included, along with statistics on SNAP recipients such as the percentage of families who are in poverty or extreme poverty and the general age groups of children who benefit.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Hunger, Low income groups, National programs, Poverty, Research, Statistics, Supplemental food programs

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

Cervantes W. 2011. Children of immigrants and nutrition supports. Washington, DC: First Focus, 2 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses food insecurity among children of immigrants, its consequences, and programs that are available to help. The paper explains why immigrant parents frequently fail to make use of such programs, even if they are eligible; why some programs are more successful than others at enrolling immigrant families; and the effect of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Hunger, Immigrants, Low income groups, Outreach, Parents, Poverty, Programs, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Supplemental food programs, WIC program

Hartline-Grafton H. 2010. How improving federal nutrition program access and quality work together to reduce hunger and promote healthy eating. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 6 pp. (Issue briefs for child nutrition reauthorization, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief examines America's childhood hunger problem, the childhood obesity epidemic, and why and how the federal programs for hunger reduction and healthy eating strategies can and should be mutually reinforcing.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition programs, Children, Food consumption, Hunger, Obesity

White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity. 2010. Solving the problem of childhood obesity within a generation: Report to the president. [Washington, DC]: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 120 pp.

Annotation: This report provides 70 specific recommendations for reducing childhood obesity. The recommendations fall into the following categories: (1) giving children a healthy start in life, (2) empowering parents and caregivers, (3) providing healthy food in schools, (4) improving access to healthy, affordable food, (5) helping children become more physically active.

Contact: Let's Move, Web Site: http://www.letsmove.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Breastfeeding, Child health, Communities, Costs, Early childhood education, Hunger, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prenatal care, Programs, Schools, Young children

Potamites E, Gordon A. 2010. Children's food security and intakes from school meals. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, ca. 135 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 61)

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined the contributions of school meals to the food and nutrient intake of children in food-secure, marginally secure, and food-insecure households. The report includes a description of the data and methods, discusses characteristics of food-insecure and marginally secure students, compares dietary intakes by food security status, and discusses the percentage of school lunch foods consumed and food security and breakfast skipping.

Contact: National Agricultural Library, Abraham Lincoln Building, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5755 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-6856 Fax: (301) 504-6927 E-mail: lmooney@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Research, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Wight VR, Thampi K, Briggs J. 2010. Who are America's poor children? Examining food insecurity among children in the United States. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 15 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report focuses on food insecurity -- defined as the lack of consistent access to adequate food -- among children in the United States. Using data from the 2008 Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement, the report examines what is known about food insecurity today, why this social problem warrants attention, and what policy solutions might help families minimize the degree to which they experience this material hardship. In the first section, the authors define the concept and measurement of food insecurity and assess how the proportion of households with children who are food insecure has changed over the past decade. Next the authors examine the population of households with food insecurity among children, assessing the causes and consequences associated with this hardship. The report concludes with a discussion of public policy approaches developed to relieve food insecurity.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child health, Data, Food supply, High risk groups, Hunger, National surveys, Statistics

Food Research and Action Center. 2009. Ending childhood hunger by 2015: The essential strategies for achieving the President's goals. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper, addressed to advocates and policy-makers interested in ending child hunger, describes seven strategies for ending child hunger: (1) restore economic growth and create jobs with better wages for lower income workers; (2) raise the incomes of the lowest income families; (3) strengthen the supplemental nutrition assistance program /food stamp program; (4) strengthen the child nutrition programs; (5) engage the entire federal government in ending childhood hunger; (6) work with states, localities and nonprofits to expand and improve participation in federal nutrition programs; and (7) make sure all families have convenient access to reasonably priced, healthy food.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Federal programs, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition programs, Program coordination, Public policy, Strategic plans

Nord M. 2009. Food insecurity in households with children: Prevalence, severity, and household characteristics. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 43 pp. (Economic information bulletin number 56)

Annotation: This report focuses on food insecurity among U.S. households with children. The report introduces the issue and discusses the concepts of food security and food insecurity and 2007 national statistics; levels of food insecurity; food insecurity and childhood hunger; associations between children's health and development and food insecurity; trends in food insecurity in households with children; food insecurity among children in selected subpopulations; Food and Nutrition Assistance Program participation; and food insecurity in households with children by state.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Families, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition programs, Poverty, Statistical data, Trends

Murphy C, Ettinger de Cuba S, Cook J, Cooper R, Weill JD. 2008. Reading, writing and hungry: The consequences of food insecurity on children, and on our nation's economic success. Washington, DC: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the range of economic consequences associated with persistently high rates of household food insecurity in the United States. It focuses specifically on the harmful effects of food insecurity for very young children, identifying short- and long-term economic costs of these effects. Topics include prenatal nutrition and infant health; food insecurity and physical health to age five; cognitive development; socio-emotional and behavioral consequences; maternal depression child health, and food insecurity; linkages between food insecurity and obesity; long-term health; preventive measures; directions for future research and policy implications.

Contact: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 1025 F Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 E-mail: info@partnershipforsuccess.org Web Site: http://www.PartnershipforSuccess.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Child development, Food, Hunger, Infants, Maternal health, Prevention, Socioeconomic status, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.