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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (445 total).

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Susin J, Kaplan L. n.d.. "Breaking the Silence" tool kit: A how-to guide to bring mental illness education to schools in your community—A school outreach project. (Rev. ed.). Lake Success, NY: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 46 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit, geared toward program facilitators and volunteer educators, provides methods for bringing the Breaking the Silence program to communities. The purpose of the program is to break the silence about mental illness in schools. The toolkit provides a background on Breaking the Silence, the rationale for mental illness education, information about how to organize and fund a local program, how to enlist and train volunteers, and materials documenting the success of Breaking the Silence. The program is intended for use in upper elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.

Contact: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Queens/Nassau, 1981 Marcus Avenue, C-117, Lake Success, NY 11042, Telephone: (516) 326-0797 Secondary Telephone: (718) 347-7284 Fax: (516) 437-5785 E-mail: namiqn@aol.com Web Site: http://www.nami.org/MSTemplate.cfm?MicrositeID=241 Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Communities, Health education, Mental disorders, Mental health, Resource materials, Schools, Training

Children's Aid Society. n.d.. A history of innovation. New York, NY: Children's Aid Society, 1 v.

Annotation: This timeline tracks historic highlights from the Children's Aid Society's (CAS) founding in 1853, tracing changes in poverty in New York City along with the evolution of CAS programs and services. Topics include emigration programs such as the Orphan Train, foster care and adoption programs, lodging houses, industrial schools, convalescent homes, health centers, and farm schools.

Contact: Children's Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 949-4800 Secondary Telephone: (212) 949-4936 Fax: (212) 377-4705 Web Site: http://www.childrensaidsociety.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, History, Homeless persons, New York, Oral health, Poverty, Schools

Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools. n.d.. Community schools: Promoting student success–A rationale and results framework. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document for local policymakers and practitioners provides guidance on implementing a community school strategy. It outlines a rationale for the community school as a primary vehicle for increasing student success and strengthening families and community. The document also defines specific results that community schools seek -- both in terms of how they function and in relationship to the well being of students, families, and communities. Contents include the community schools vision, guiding principles, logic model, and framework for student success. Conditions for learning and indicators of capacity are also addressed.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Development, Education, Families, Leadership, Learning, Models, Program improvement, Schools, Students, Teaching

Action for Healthy Kids. n.d.. Classroom energizers and brain breaks. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This document provides tips on ways to include fitness breaks in school and resources available to help schools get started. Contents include ideas for classroom activity breaks, using music, suggestions for middle and high school students, tips on involving physical education teachers, and asking students to share their physical activity break ideas.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Aronson SS, Shope TR, eds. 2019. Managing infectious diseases in child care and schools: A quick reference guide (5th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 253 pp.

Annotation: This guide is a tool to encourage common understanding among educators, families, and health professionals about infectious diseases in group settings for children. The guide identifies the role of educators, families, public health officials, and health professionals in preventing and controlling the spread of communicable infections; symptoms of infections commonly found in group settings for children; how infections are spread (route of transmission); when to seek medical attention; inclusion and exclusion criteria; strategies and sample forms for communications involving directors/caregivers, parents/guardians, and health professionals; and resources for professional development for directors/teachers/caregivers related to infectious diseases.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org . Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-050-3.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Communicable disease control, Communicable diseases, Forms, Infection control, Infections, Prevention, Resources for professionals, Schools

Action for Healthy Kids. 2019. Recess for learning. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information and tips on providing and advocating for recess to improve learning and school health. Topics include advocating for more, better, and active recess; recess before lunch; making recess inclusive; playground design; and recess for secondary students. Resources are included.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Equal opportunities, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Action for Healthy Kids. 2019. Before and after-school activities. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This document provides tips on helping children get 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day by engaging them in before- and after-school activities. Contents include information and resources on out-of-school time programs and walk and bike to school initiatives, tips on starting a walking or running club, and encouraging student involvement in intramural programs.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, After school programs, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Amah G, Jura M, Mertz E. 2019. Practice patterns of postgraduate dental residency completers from select long-term HRSA-funded primary dental care training programs. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Resource Center, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to examine practice patterns of graduates of primary care dental postgraduate training programs with a history of Health Resources and Services Administration funding. The study aims were to assess the impact of graduates’ training experience on current practice patterns and subsequent patient access to care and to measure the long-term impact of these programs on improving dentists’ capacity to meet the needs of those who are underserved. The report provides background and discusses study methods, findings, and limitations. A discussion of the findings, including information about policy implications, is included.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental schools, Dentists, Graduate education, Low income groups, Oral health, Public policy, Research

Manz M. 2017. Guidance on selecting a sample for a school-based oral health survey. Sparks, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document provides sampling guidelines for state and territorial health agencies and other jurisdictions planning to conduct a school-based oral health survey. Topics include appropriate sampling designs, steps for and examples of the sampling process, what to do if a school refuses to participate, and information about specialized data-analysis software.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Oral health, Research methodology, Schools, Surveys

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Mann R, Mays A. 2017. State ESSA plans to support student health and wellness: A framework for action (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on developing state plans for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in ways that support student health and wellness. Topics include engaging stakeholders in a way that ensures an effective ESSA state plan is developed and implemented; implementing a state accountability system and creating a school report card that supports the health and learning connection; integrating health and wellness into standards, assessments, and a well-rounded education; integrating student learning through staff wellness and professional development; supporting the transition from early childhood programs to elementary school; transferring funding to strengthen ESSA health and wellness programming; the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant; and looking ahead. For each topic, the document outlines why it's important, what the law says, action steps, and resources. An overview of ESSA is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Accountability, Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Federal initiatives, Financing, Grants, Learning, Needs Assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Service integration, Standards, Statewide planning, Students, Transitions

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

Hall E. 2017. Identifying a school quality/student success indicator for ESSA: Requirements and considerations. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements for the inclusion of a school quality or student success indicator (referred to as the "5th indicator), including requirements to ensure that the indicator contributes to a state's system of school and district accountability. Highlights include key factors to consider when identifying, evaluating, and implementing a school quality or student success indicator for inclusion in a state's accountability system. Examples of school quality and student success indicators and research supporting those indicators are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Evaluation, Limited English speakers, Measures, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regulations, School districts, Schools, Students, Systems development

Sweetland J, Gibbons C, Vo C. 2017. Reframing school discipline: A strategic communications playbook. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines 12 evidence-based framing strategies that communicators in the education, justice, and civil rights sectors can use to challenge exclusionary discipline policies, build support for reducing racial disparities in disciplinary outcomes, and cultivate awareness of alternative approaches such as restorative justice and trauma-informed schools.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Communication, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Schools, Stress, Students, Trauma

Sealant Work Group. 2017. Report of the Sealant Work Group: Recommendations & products. Washington, DC: Children's Dental Health Project, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for states to strengthen the ability of school-based dental sealant programs to reach more children, especially those at high risk for dental caries. Contents include recommendations in the following priority areas: promoting evidence-based and promising practices; communicating with families, the community, and school staff; collecting, analyzing, and reporting data; addressing Medicaid and reporting data; and addressing Medicaid and regulatory hurdles. A summary of the recommendations, an infographic, a questions-and-answers document, and a communications plan worksheet are also available.

Contact: Children's Dental Health Project, 1020 19th Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 833-8288 Fax: (202) 331-1432 E-mail: info@cdhp.org Web Site: https://www.cdhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Access to health care, Case management, Certification, Children, Communication, Data analysis, Data collection, Dental care, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Licensing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Policy development, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Program development, Program planning, Public health infrastructure, Regulations, Resources for professionals, School health programs, School health services, Schools, Standards, State health agencies, State programs, Vulnerability, Work force

Schubel J. 2017. Medicaid helps schools help children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the role of Medicaid in funding critical health-related services for students with disabilities. Topics include providing reimbursement for health care services that are necessary for students with disabilities to succeed in school and ensuring schools' compliance with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requirements, helping students to stay healthy and succeed academically, and connecting students to coverage. The brief also describes the long-term benefits of Medicaid for eligible children and the potential impact of spending reductions on students, local communities, and state budgets. The appendix contains a table on state and federal Medicaid spending in schools.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Role, School health services, Schools, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.