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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (73 total).

Clark D. n.d.. Dietary score: Assessment tools and instructions. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health , 20 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a dietary assessment tool used by licensed dietitians for WIC applicants and participants. The tool is divided into four sections, which are: 1) dietary questions, 2) food frequency, 3) nutrition risk assessment, and 4) space for a nutrition care plan. Each section has blank forms and instructions and suggestions.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 Contact Phone: (515) 281-5787 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietitians, Food habits, Forms, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, WIC Program

Schoenberg M, Heider F, Rosenthal J, Schwartz C, Kaye N. 2015. State experiences designing and implementing Medicaid delivery system reform incentive payment (DSRIP) pools. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an analysis of eight Medicaid delivery system reform incentive payment (DSRIP) and DSRIP-like programs and federal, state, and provider perspectives on program implementation. The report also offers insight into the role of DSRIPs in the Medicaid delivery system by examining key policy issues including program design, financing, measurement, and monitoring.

Contact: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, 1800 M Street, N.W., Suite 360 South, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 350-2000 Fax: (202) 273-2452 E-mail: macpac@macpac.gov Web Site: http://www.macpac.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Financing, Health care reform, Measures, Medicaid, Monitoring, Policy analysis, Reimbursement, Service delivery systems

Valencia A. 2014. Healthy Smiles, Healthy Growth, 2013–2014: Assessing the oral health status and body mass index of third grade children in Illinois. Chicago, IL: Chicago Community Oral Health Forum, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an assessment of the oral health and weight status of children in third grade in Illinois. Contents include information about the survey methods, oral health disparities, growth disparities, and conclusions. Results are compared to results from earlier surveys.

Contact: Heartland Alliance, Oral Health Forum, 1100 W. Cermak, Suite 518, Chicago, IL 60608, Telephone: (773) 491-2632 Web Site: https://www.heartlandalliance.org/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Ethnic groups, Growth monitoring, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health status, Illinois, Low income groups, Needs assessment, Obesity, Oral health, Preventive health services, School age children, School based management, Screenings, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Jee J, Nagarajan J. 2014. Identification and assessment of children and youth with special health care needs in Medicaid managed care: Approaches from three states. Portland, OR: National Academy for State Health Policy, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report describes approaches in three states (California, Michigan, and Minnesota) to identify and assess children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in Medicaid managed care. Topics include identification and assessment of contract requirements; monitoring and quality improvement; and collaboration between Medicaid, health plans, Title V, and families. The report concludes with a discussion and promising practices for implementing Medicaid managed care for CYSHCN that emerged from the states studied.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Collaboration, Contract services, Families, Medicaid managed care, Monitoring, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Special health care needs, Title V programs

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2012. Autism A.L.A.R.M.. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provided health professionals with basic information about the prevalence of It provides the surveillance and screening algorithm.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Diagnosis, Monitoring, Referrals, Screening, Treatment

Kim H, Yang M. 2012. Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data book. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Health, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 78 pp.

Annotation: This data book provides information on thirteen health topics regarding material behaviors and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy, using information from the Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). The topics include unintended pregnancy, pre-pregnancy, obesity, prepregnancy multivitamin use, intimate partner violence, tobacco use, prenatal care, flu vaccination, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, perinatal depression, low birth weight, preterm birth, breastfeeding, and infant sleep position. The data book focuses on monitoring the prevalence of health problems over time and identifying groups at high risk for the problems. Figures throughout the book present statistics based on PRAMS survey data for 2004-2009.

Contact: Rhode Island Department of Health, Three Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908, Telephone: (401) 222-5960 Web Site: http://www.health.state.ri.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Maternal health, Monitoring, Pregnancy, Rhode Island, Risk assessment, State initiatives, Statistics, Women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Community report from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network: Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among multiple areas of the United States in 2008. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the rise in the number of children diagnosed with autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), how children are identified and served in local communities, and the need for accelerated research. Contents include defining ASDs, how many people have ASDs, what is the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) network, results of monitoring and the prevalence of ASDs in national and state-by-state demographics, and how the data can be used. Additional information is provided on related topics and resources.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Surveillance, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Monitoring, National surveys, State surveys

Adkins M, Frank S, Hawkins H, O'Neil ME, Stampfel C, Willilams L. 2012. Data-driven decisions: Using surveillance data to inform infant safe sleep programs. [Lansing, MI]: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief describes how surveillance data, such as that collected through the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), can guide decision marking for programs, especially those related to infant sleep. The brief includes state-specific examples and use of PRAMS in informing programmatic change in safe sleep programs. The brief indicates which states participate in PRAMS and highlights data-supported infant safe sleep efforts in states such as Alaska, Michigan, and Florida. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, c/o The KIDS Network, , 1148 Hillside, Suite 10, Wichita, KS 67211, Telephone: (800) 930-7437 E-mail: aharvieux@aim.org Web Site: http://www.asip1.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Data collection, Injury prevention, Monitoring, Program development, SIDS, Sleep position, State initiatives

Horchler JN, Rice R. 2011. SIDS and infant death survival guide: Information and comfort for grieving family and friends and professionals who seek to help them. (4th ed., rev. and upd.). Hyattsville, MD: SIDS Educational Services, 324 pp. (Continues: The SIDS Survival Guide)

Annotation: This book provides information for parents and other caregivers who have lost a child to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Topics include a definition of SIDS, perspectives from experts, a brief review of research into a diagnostic test, a history of SIDS, and accounts by parents of their experiences. Additional topics include dealing with guilt and anger; grieving and bereavement; the grief of fathers, other siblings, and grandparents; the loss of an infant at the childcare provider's; advice for friends of parents who have lost an infant; planning a funeral and the role of the clergy; advice on grieving and moving forward; dealing with anniversaries and holidays; advice on peer contact and professional help; emergency medical responders and the authorities; and a subsequent baby and the question of home monitoring. Additional information is provided on guilt and risk reduction; dreams and premonitions; and more stories and poems from the experience of losing an infant. The appendices include national and international organizations that provide information, counseling, research data, and grants on SIDS and related topics as well as a bibliography and a suggested reading list. The 3rd edition is available in Spanish.

Contact: SIDS Educational Services, P.O. Box 2426, Hyattsville, MD 20784-0426, Telephone: (301) 322-2620 Fax: (301) 322-9822 E-mail: sidses@aol.com Web Site: http://www.sidssurvivalguide.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9641218-0-5.

Keywords: Bereavement, Child care, Clergy, Consumer education materials, Family support, Grandparents, Grief, Home monitoring, Infant death, Parent support services, Parents, Risk assessment, SIDS, Siblings, Spanish language materials

Duckworth K, Gruttadaro D, Markey D. 2010. What families should know about adolescent depression (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about adolescent depression and treatment options. It introduces adolescent depression and its causes and symptoms and getting an accurate diagnosis. It then discusses treatment, including talk therapy and medications; risks and benefits of antidepressants, as well as family history and treatment. Risk of suicide is also presented, creating good monitoring systems and safety plans, treatment research, and how to be an effective advocate for an adolescent with depression. The guide concludes with resources.

Contact: National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203, Telephone: (703) 524-7600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 950-6264 Fax: (703) 524-9094 E-mail: info@nami.org Web Site: http://www.nami.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Antidepressant drugs, Cognitive therapy, Consumer education materials, Depression, Families, Monitoring, Parents, Safety, Treatment

Stallings VA, Suitor CW, Taylor CL, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Nutrition Standards for National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. 2010. School meals: Building blocks for healthy children. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on revising its standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. The recommendations are based on a review and assessment of Dietary Reference Intakes (a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine) and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (jointly prepared by the USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). The eight recommendations in the report update the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) nutrition standards and meal requirements approved in 1995; shift the focus toward meeting recommendations in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines; emphasize the need for effective implementation; and identify key research topics. The recommendations encompass standards for menu planning and standards for meals as selected by the student (in contrast to those that are simply offered to students). Seventeen appendixes include sample menus, data tales, definitions, and comparisons between the existing guidelines and proposed revisions for school meal preparation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Data, Dietary guidelines, Federal programs, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition programs, Program evaluation, School age children, School breakfast programs, School food services, School lunch programs

Williams L, O'Neil ME. 2010. Two pieces of the puzzle: A collaboration between the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Systems (PRAMS) and the Federal Healthy Start Initiative. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief describes how the Federal Healthy Start Initiative and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) are collaborating in efforts to identify, assess, and address maternal behaviors and conditions that prevent women from having a healthy pregnancy. The brief describes the goals of federal Healthy Start programs to reduce infant mortality.and explains how PRAMS (the surveillance system developed by the U.S. Center's for Disease Control and Prevention to identify and monitor maternal behavior and experiences before, during, and after pregnancy) collects state-specific data on core topics in maternal and child health. The brief describes why it makes sense for the Healthy Start and PRAMS programs to work together and provides examples of collaborative efforts in New York City, Georgia, South Dakota, Michigan, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. It also explains how programs can begin to collaborate.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Population surveillance, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention programs, Risk assessment, State initiatives, Surveys

Finke J, Plonski-Fuqua B, Hartley B, Hargrave AF, Tasev D, Tumolo C, Vargas PA. 2009. Asthma guidelines for schools. Arizona Asthma Coalition in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Education and Arizona Department of Health Services, 22 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide information to help school administrators, school health personnel, teachers, and support staff understand how to monitor asthma control in the school setting and how to help identify students with poorly controlled asthma so that parents can be encouraged to follow-up with the student’s health care provider. Included are District-level policy and procedure recommendations for asthma management; a lists of responsibilities for school personnel; students; and families; age-specific information on asthma control; Arizona statutes related to medical treatment in school settings; and individual treatment plans for students with asthma.

Contact: Arizona Asthma Coalition, 5804 N. Echo Canyon Lane, Phoenix, AZ 85018, E-mail: JHarris@azasthma.org Web Site: http://www.azasthma.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Asthma, Health education, Monitoring, School health, School-aged children, State initiatives, Treatment

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2008. Head Start: A more comprehensive risk management strategy and data improvements could further strengthen program oversight. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the Administration for Children and Families' (ACF's) progress related to the oversight of local organizations that receive Head Start program grants and the grantees' financial management. Also examined are ACF's progress in conducting a risk assessment of the Head Start program and ensuring the accuracy and reliability of data from its annual Program Information Report survey of grantees, ACF's efforts to improve its on-site monitoring processes, and ACF's use of data to improve oversight and help grantees meet performance standards.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Grants management, Head Start, Monitoring, Oral health, Program evaluation, Risk management

USC Division of Community Health. 2006. Reaching out and reaching in: Understanding efforts to identify and enroll uninsured children into health insurance programs. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a review of what is known about the effectiveness of outreach and enrollment strategies for uninsured children in California and a framework for ways to evaluate future outreach and enrollment programs. The report is based on (1) information gathered from published studies and reports, (2) information gathered from scans of outreach and enrollment activities in California, including those targeting children, and (3) data collected by the Division of Community Health during the past 5 years on projects that include or are closely related to outreach and health insurance program enrollment. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) conceptual framework for assessing outreach and enrollment, (2) assessment: identify and understand the target population, (3) approaches to outreach, enrollment, retention, and utilization, (4) developing networks and partnerships, (5) addressing policy and program barriers, (6) program monitoring, evaluation, and finance, (7) conclusion and summary, and (8) recommendations. References are included.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, California, Child health, Financing, Low income groups, Monitoring, Outreach: Enrollment, Program evaluation, Public policy, Research, State health insurance programs, Uninsured persons

Friedman DJ. 2006. Assessing the potential of national strategies for electronic health records for population health monitoring and research. Rockville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 83 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 125)

Annotation: This report assesses the potential of national strategies for electronic health records for population health monitoring and research. The report has a fourfold purpose: (1) to describe the current status of national strategies for electronic health records and their supporting national health infrastructures in Australia, Canada, England, and New Zealand; (2) to summarize themes about potential contributions of strategies for electronic health records, and to describe barriers; (3) to summarize themes emerging from key informant interviews; and (4) to delineate fundamental issues in the relationship between national strategies for electronic health records and population health and monitoring.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: PHS 2007-1343; ISBN 0-8406-0607-9.

Keywords: Health, Medical records, Monitoring, National programs, Population dynamics, Research

National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity. 2005. Model local school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, 26 pp.

Annotation: These model school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition, which are intended for use by school districts, are based on nutrition science, public health research, and existing practices from exemplary states and local school districts around the country. The policies include a background section, a discussion of how to use the policies, a list of organizations that assisted with or supported the development of the policies, and the policies themselves. Policy goals are presented, as well as steps that school districts can take to achieve the goals. The section on achieving policy goals is divided into the following subsections: (1) school health councils, (2) nutritional quality of foods and beverages sold and served on campus, (3) nutrition and physical activity promotion and food marketing, (4) physical activity opportunities and physical education, (5) monitoring and policy review, and (6) resources for local school wellness policies on nutrition and physical activity.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Health promotion, Marketing, Models, Monitoring, Physical activity, Physical education, Public policy, Resource materials, School districts, School health, Schools

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2004. Managing gestational diabetes: A patient's guide to a healthy pregnancy. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 45 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides general guidelines for pregnant women with gestational diabetes for keeping healthy during pregnancy and for promoting the best outcome for the baby. It describes gestational diabetes, its causes and its features, includes a general treatment plan to help control the condition in making informed decisions about care with their health care providers, dietitians, and family members. Appendices provide information on high-fiber foods, a sample menu, and sample record sheets for monitoring glucose, food, and physical activity.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 04-2788.

Keywords: Blood glucose self monitoring, Gestational diabetes, Nutrition, Patient education materials, Physical activity, Pregnancy complications, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Trust for America's Health. 2003. Birth defects tracking and prevention one year later: One step forward. Two steps back?. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 6 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This brief describes the importance of registries created to monitor birth defects, and their role in forming the backbone of a vital, functional, and responsive public health network. Topics include birth defect registries as a key to prevention, the threat of state budget pressures on sustaining registries, and an outline of the progress being made at the state level. A chart illustrates state changes in the registry program and how changes have affected the status of prevention efforts.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Monitoring, Population surveillance, State initiatives

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2003. Criteria for determining disability in infants and children: Short stature—Summary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 7 pp. (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 73)

Annotation: This evidence report provides a systematic review of the scientific evidence about whether short stature in a child due to a medically determinable cause may be associated with disability, whether skeletal dysplasias in a child may be considered a disability, and whether decreasing growth velocity in a child with a chronic disease may serve as an indicator of severity of the disease.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 03-E025.

Keywords: Children, Chronic Illnesses and disabilities, Disabilities, Growth disorders, Growth monitoring, Short stature

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.