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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (145 total).

Milner-Fenwick. n.d.. Teen contraception. Timonium, MD: Milner-Fenwick, 1 videotape (13:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch). (Video counseling library)

Annotation: This videotape dispels common myths about contraception and describes a range of contraceptive options available today, including Norplant, Depro-Provera, and abstinence. It discusses the importance of using condoms in conjunction with other contraceptives to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The information is presented by adolescents in a non-judgmental fashion; it does contain some explicit scenes. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Milner-Fenwick, 2125 Greenspring Drive, Timonium, MD 21093-3113, Telephone: (800) 432-8433 Secondary Telephone: (410) 252-1700 Fax: (410) 252-6316 E-mail: patiented@milner-fenwick.com Web Site: http://www.milner-fenwick.com/index.asp $250.00. Document Number: OB-130.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2016. Women's preventive services: Required health plan coverage guidelines. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This website provides information about required health plan coverage guidelines for women's preventive services under the Affordable Care Act. It includes a table listing type of preventive service, guidelines for health insurance coverage, and frequency of coverage. Preventive service types listed include well-woman visits, gestational diabetes screening, human papillomavirus testing, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, counseling and screening for human immune-deficiency virus, contraceptive methods and counseling, and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, HIV screening, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health services, Human papillomavirus, Interpersonal violence, Legislation, Prevention, Reproductive health, Screening, Sexually transmitted infections, Testing, Women's health

Women's Preventive Services Initiative. 2016. Final report to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources & Services Administration: Recommendations for preventive services for women (abridged report). Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document presents recommendations for women's preventive health care services. Topics include breast cancer screening for average-risk women, breastfeeding services and supplies, screening for cervical cancer, contraception and contraceptive counseling, screening for gestational diabetes mellitus, screening for human immunodeficiency virus, screening for interpersonal and domestic violence, counseling for sexually transmitted infections, and well-woman preventive visits.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Breastfeeding, Cervical cancer, Contraception, Counseling, Domestic violence, Gestational diabetes, Guidelines, HIV screening, Health screening, Health services delivery, Interpersonal violence, Preventive health services, Sexually transmitted diseases, Women's health

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2016. 6 | 18 Initiative: Accelerating Evidence into Action–State Medicaid & Public Health Convening: Meeting summary. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a convening held on February 8–9, 2016, to launch a collaborative engagement with states to help them explore how to translate the evidence on interventions related to controlling asthma, tobacco cessation, and unintended pregnancy prevention into implementation within state Medicaid programs. Contents include pre-convening planning calls, state identified priorities and state convening meeting objectives, an overview of state convening, state team planning summary results, evaluation summary, and next steps. The appendices contain a description of the 6 | 18 Initiative to align evidence-based preventive practices with emerging value-based payment and delivery models, the meeting agenda, the participant list, and the state action plan template.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Collaboration, Contraception, Health care delivery, Learning, Medicaid, Meetings, Models, National initiatives, Peer groups, Policy development, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Program planning, Reimbursement, State programs, Statewide planning, Teamwork, Tobacco cessation

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Horn S, Bridges E. 2014. Emergency contraception: A safe and effective contraceptive option for teens. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp. (The facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on emergency contraception (EC) including the types of EC and their characteristics, the safety and effectiveness of EC, and access to EC. The fact sheet includes a chart showing each type of EC (antiprogestin, progestin-only, birth control pills, and copper intrauterine device), how it works, where and how to get it, and side effects.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Barriers, Emergency contraception, Sexual health

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Teen pregnancy prevention: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources about health care for teens and websites for parents, caregivers, and teens about teen pregnancy prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Bibliographies, Contraception, Electronic publications, Families, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. What home visitors can do to help their clients achieve adequate birth spacing and avoid unplanned pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Briefly)

Annotation: This brief for home visitors and for sites implementing home visiting programs provides information on why pregnancy planning and, in particular, adequate birth spacing matters for the health of both women and infants as well as their families. It also offers simple guidance for home visitors on how to discuss pregnancy planning and spacing as part of home visits. Descriptions of relevant resources are also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Family health, Family planning, Home visiting, Infant health, Preconception care, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

Kaye K, Gootman JA, Ng AS, Finley C. 2014. The benefits of birth control in America: Getting the facts straight. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the benefits to women, men, children, and society of pregnancy planning and the use of birth control in particular. Topics include reduced unplanned pregnancy and abortion, improved maternal and infant health, improved family well-being, advancement in women's education and employment, and benefits to society.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-082-6.

Keywords: Abortion, Contraception, Costs, Educational attainment, Employment, Family health, Family planning, Infant health, Maternal health, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. Unplanned pregnancy among college students and strategies to address it. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 5 pp. (Briefly)

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, College health services, College students, Community participation, Contraception, Intervention, Pregnancy prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Young adults

Frost JJ, Zolna MR, Frohwirth L. 2014. Contraceptive needs and services, 2012 update. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report provides estimates of contraceptive needs and services in the United States and of the impact that publicly-funded clinic services in particular have on preventing unintended pregnancy. Estimates are made for the national and state levels. The report highlights the national-level findings and trends, and includes summary tables of national and state data.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Contraception, Data, Family planning, Government financing, Needs assessment, Preventive health services, Trends

Guttmacher Institute. 2013. Sex and HIV education. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 5 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes state-level sex and HIV education policies, as well as specific content requirements, based on a review of state laws, regulations, and other legally binding policies. Topics include whether such education is mandated, parental involvement, contraception, marriage, negative outcomes, skills for healthy sexuality, and abstinence. Charts list requirements in each state.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Contraception, Schools, Sexuality education, State legislation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2013. Contraception calling: Why aren't more young women listening?. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses a 2013 nationally representative survey of adolescents and young adults about what women think about contraception. Topics include pregnancy intention versus behavior, what method of contraception single women use, contraception concerns, how their choice of method was made, and what contraception methods young women want.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Contraception, Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive use, Family planning, Surveys, Women's health, Young women

Avellino L, Eisler A. 2013. Keep it simple: Linking teens to sexual health care. Balitmore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Atlanta, GA: CAI Global ,

Annotation: This 45-minute module is designed to help male and female adolescents ages 15-19 connect with health professionals who can provide contraception care and reproductive health care. The module addresses the question of why adolescents do not typically access such services, including lack of knowledge about their right to care, available services, and the location of health professionals in the community who can meet their needs. The module includes a short motion graphic that can be shared online as a stand-alone product to facilitate increased access, improve awareness about contraceptive methods available to adolescents, and promote linkages to care. The graphic is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials, Training materials

ECRI Institute. 2013. AHRQ healthcare horizon scanning system: Potential high-impact interventions report–Priority Area 12: Pregnancy, including preterm birth. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Healthcare Horizon Scanning System as a systematic process to identify and monitor target technologies and innovations in health care and to create an inventory of target technologies that have the highest potential for impact on clinical care, the health care system, patient outcomes, and costs. It also describes its role as a tool for the public to identify and find information on new health care technologies and interventions. This report discusses two topics, the Preconception Care System for improving health outcomes in pregnancy (Gabby) and the use of vending machine dispensers for emergency oral contraceptive (Plan B One-Step) to prevent pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive use, Medical technology, Medical technology, Oral contraception, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Research methodology

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2012. Contraceptive services. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 4 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet summarizes statistics on the reproductive health and contraceptive service utilization of U.S. women. Trends in public funding of reproductive health services, particularly Title X-funded programs, as well as a cost-benefit discussion of publicly funded family planning programs are included. Demographic characteristics such as race and marital status are included along with frequency data on sexual activity, contraceptive methods, and pregnancy. A discussion of where women obtain contraceptive services is also included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Contact Phone: (800) 825-0061 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Contraception, Family planning, Government financing, Health care financing, Public Health Service Act, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Title X, Trends, Unplanned pregnancy

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2012. Explaining recent trends in the U.S. teen bith rate. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 31 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17964)

Annotation: This paper investigates possible explanations for the large decline in U.S. adolescent childbearing that occurred in the 20 years following the 1991 peak. The authors review previous evidence and the results of new analyses to arrive at a set of observations that are presented in the paper. The methodology and findings are presented.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Racial factors, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Ethnic factors, Family planning programs, Medicaid, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Statistical data, Trends

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.