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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (94 total).

Milner-Fenwick. n.d.. Teen contraception. Timonium, MD: Milner-Fenwick, 1 videotape (13:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch). (Video counseling library)

Annotation: This videotape dispels common myths about contraception and describes a range of contraceptive options available today, including Norplant, Depro-Provera, and abstinence. It discusses the importance of using condoms in conjunction with other contraceptives to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The information is presented by adolescents in a non-judgmental fashion; it does contain some explicit scenes. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Milner-Fenwick, 2125 Greenspring Drive, Timonium, MD 21093-3113, Telephone: (800) 432-8433 Secondary Telephone: (410) 252-1700 Fax: (410) 252-6316 E-mail: patiented@milner-fenwick.com Web Site: http://www.milner-fenwick.com/index.asp $250.00. Document Number: OB-130.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Campaign for Our Children. n.d.. Campaign for Our Children: [Abstinence education posters]. Milwaukee, WI: Campaign for Our Children, 3 posters (11 x 28 inches).

Annotation: These three posters use bright colors and/or large graphic images to communicate the advantages of abstinence. Each poster features the name and phone number of the Milwaukee Campaign for Our Children, and each is available in English and Spanish. The first poster displays the message: "Don't like the odds? Don't have sex." The second reads: "Virgin. It's not a dirty word." The third cautions: "Make sex a game and it'll make you a loser."

Contact: Campaign for Our Children, 120 West Fayette Street, Suite 1200, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 576-9015 Fax: (410) 752-2191 Web Site: http://www.cfoc.org $8.00 plus $4.25 shipping and handling; prepayment required.

Keywords: Abstinence, Audiovisual materials, Educational materials, Posters, Sexuality education, Spanish language materials

Barzel R, Holt K, Kolo S. 2018. Prescribing opioids for women of reproductive age: Information for dentists. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document provides an overview of pain management for dental procedures for women of reproductive age and discusses pharmacological considerations for pregnant women (pharmaceutical agents and indications, contraindications, and special considerations), neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome, guidelines for providing opioids, managing acute dental pain, and guidelines for discharging women with opioid prescriptions. Information about prescription drug monitoring programs is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Drug addiction, Guidelines, Narcotics, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Oral health, Pain relieving drugs, Pregnant women, Prescription drugs

Children's Safety Network. 2016. Medication abuse prevention: 2016 resource guide. Waltham, MA: Children's Safety Network, 19 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes organizations, policy and legislation, prevention programs, publications, and webinars focused on prescription drug overdose prevention among youth and young adults. Contents include descriptions of reports, guides, toolkits, campaigns, website, iinitiatives, and research studies. Each item includes a short description and a link to the resource itself. Information about child safety and neonatal abstinence syndrome are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Drug effects, Infants, Legislation, Multimedia, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Policy development, Prescription drugs, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Safety, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse prevention programs, Young adults

Ko HY, Patrick SW, Tong VT, Patel R, Lind JN, Barfield WD. 2016. Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome: 28 states, 1999–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802,

Annotation: This report examines state trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) incidence using all-payer, hospital inpatient delivery discharges compiled in the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) during 1999–2013. The findings underscore the importance of state-based public health programs to prevent unnecessary opioid use and to treat substance use disorders during pregnancy, as well as decrease the incidence of NAS.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Measures, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Pregnant women, State programs, Statistical data, Substance use disorders, Trends

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2015. State profiles fiscal year 2014: A portrait of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the states. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States,

Annotation: These resources for advocates, educators, policymakers, public health professionals, parents, youth, and community stakeholders comprise profiles of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the United States. Topics include federal funding by state, total federal spending on abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, sexuality and HIV/STD education policies by state, and descriptions of evidence-based and comprehensive approaches to pregnancy-, STD-, HIV/AIDS-prevention and sexuality education programs.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Federal MCH programs, Government financing, HIV, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State MCH programs

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Reducing neonatal abstinence syndrome in Tennessee. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights partnerships to address the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) epidemic in Tennessee. Topics include efforts to expand a community-based program to assist mothers with substance abuse problems and ensure a drug-free and safe home for their newborns; provide start-up costs for a regional detox center for women addicted to prescription drugs; research the effectiveness of detox from opiate drugs during pregnancy, and the long-term effect of detox treatment on NAS rates in the state; and establish a hospital-based NAS treatment process.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Drug use during pregnancy, Financing, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention program, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment, Tennessee

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Teen pregnancy prevention: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources about health care for teens and websites for parents, caregivers, and teens about teen pregnancy prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Bibliographies, Contraception, Electronic publications, Families, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Mississippi First, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, Women's Foundation of Mississippi. 2014. Sexuality education in Mississippi: Progress in the magnolia state. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 38 pp.

Ramakrishnan M. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: How states can help advance the knowledge base for primary prevention and best practices of care. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes opportunities to avert or ameliorate the outcome of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) along a continuum of care spanning timeframes in the mother's and infant's life and the role of state health agencies. Topics include surveillance for NAS-affected infants and the sources of maternal opiate use; reimbursement for using screening protocols to detect substance abuse early in pregnancy and withdrawal signs in newborns; development of measures to ensure follow-up with opioid-dependent women and receipt of comprehensive services; and collaborative efforts to strengthen clinical standards for identification, management, and follow-up with NAS-affected infants and their families. A state index of resources is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Intervention, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal addiction, Newborn infants, Opiates, Population surveillance, Primary prevention, Screening, State health agencies, Substance use

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Strategies for states and health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources, from a webinar held on July 16, 2014, highlight strategies for preventing and treating neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Contents include a recording of the speaker's presentations (1 hour, 27 min., 23 sec.), the webinar agenda and speaker biographies, and related materials. Topics include recent trends in opioid abuse and NAS, with an overview of federally-led prevention efforts; the impact of rising NAS rates across the states, including implications for Medicaid and examples of state-level action; a health plan-led initiative to improve care coordination and social support for pregnant women in treatment for addiction; and the latest in NAS treatment, and an assessment of where public and private investments would be most beneficial.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Drug effects, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Model programs, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborns, Opiates, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment

Guttmacher Institute. 2013. Sex and HIV education. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 5 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes state-level sex and HIV education policies, as well as specific content requirements, based on a review of state laws, regulations, and other legally binding policies. Topics include whether such education is mandated, parental involvement, contraception, marriage, negative outcomes, skills for healthy sexuality, and abstinence. Charts list requirements in each state.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Contraception, Schools, Sexuality education, State legislation

Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange. 2013. Guidelines for testing and reporting drug exposed newborns in Washington state. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to hospitals, health care providers and affiliated professionals about maternal drug screening, laboratory testing, and reporting of drug-exposed newborns delivered in Washington State. Contents include indicators for testing, hospital policy, newborn and maternal risk indicators, consent issues for testing, newborn drug testing, management of a newborn with positive drug toxicology, and reporting to Children's Administration. Appendices include references and resources, guidelines for obtaining consent, a sample letter, neonatal abstinence syndrome scoring system, and information on Washington's Children's Administration prenatal substance abuse policy.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Guidelines, Hospital services, Infant health, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State initiatives, State social service agencies, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use screening, Washington

National Abstinence Education Association. 2013. Abstinence works 2013: Sexual risk avoidance (SRA) abstinence education programs demonstrating improved teen outcome. Washington, DC: National Abstinence Education Association,

Annotation: This document provides a compendium of research on the effectiveness of sexual risk avoidance (SRA) abstinence education. It discusses understanding public health models that address sexual risk, federal funding of programs addressing sexual activity of adolescents, and using research to inform public policy. The majority of the document describes programs that are considered to have demonstrated improved teen outcomes and promising programs from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services abstinence education evaluation conferences held in 2005, 2007, and 2010.

Contact: National Abstinence Education Association, 1701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 248-5420 Web Site: http://www.thenaea.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Model programs

Washington State Department of Health, Maternal and Infant Health. 2011. Birth control: Choosing the method that's right for you. Olympia, WA: Family Planning and Reproductive Health and Maternal and Child Health, Washington State Department of Health, 44 pp.

Annotation: This consumer brochure for consumers provides information about choosing an appropriate birth control method. It describes various methods and tells how each method works, where to find it, when to use it, and its advantages and disadvantages. Information on taking charge of one's health in general is also included. It is also available in Spanish.

Contact: Health Education Resource Exchange, Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47833, Olympia, WA 98504-7833, Telephone: (360) 236-3736 Fax: (360) 664-4500 E-mail: here@doh.wa.gov Web Site: http://here.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Condoms, Consumer education materials, Contraception, Contraceptive implants, Emergency contraception, Fertility, Intrauterine devices, Spanish language materials, Sterilization

Kim CC, Rector R. 2010. Evidence on the effectiveness of abstinence education: An update. Washington, DC: Heritage Foundation, 23 pp. (Backgrounder no. 2372)

Annotation: This paper discusses 22 studies of abstinence, including those primarily intended to teach abstinence and others on virginity pledges, and examines the extent to which the program had, or did not have, positive effects.

Contact: Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Avenue, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4999, Telephone: (202) 546-4400 Fax: (202) 546-8328 E-mail: Info@heritage.org Web Site: http://www.heritage.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Community programs, Program evaluation, Sexuality education

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Adolescent Health Program. 2010. Nebraska State Abstinence Education Grant Program: State plan FY 2010. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 32 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This state plan describes the activities of Nebraska's State Abstinence Education Grant Program for 2010. The document discusses the problem and need associated with Nebraska adolescents and presents an implementation plan. Topics discussed in relation to the implementation plan include existing programs and gaps in services, challenges and barriers, mechanisms for implementation, monitoring, coordination, service recipient involvement, referrals, objective performance and efficiency measures, programmatic assurances, and budget.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Budgets, Education, High risk adolescents, High risk groups, Nebraska, Poverty, Program coordination, Referral, Service delivery, State grants, State programs

U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. 2009. Domestic abstinence-only programs: Assessing the evidence. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 673 pp. (Serials No. 110-115)

Annotation: This report contains the oral and written testimonies of members of Congress, and medical professionals about the effectiveness of abstinence-only sexual education. Debate concerns the facts of adolescent and youth sexual activity and whether abstinence-only, or comprehensive programs are more effective in serving the health needs of young people. It contains extensive studies from a variety of organizations and transcripts of an earlier hearing on the issue.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescents, Federal legislation, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Youth

Wiley D, Wilson K, Valentine R. 2009. Sexuality education in Texas public schools: Just say don't know. [Austin, TX]: Texas Freedom Network, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report examines materials from sex education programs used in Texas school districts to describe the state of sexuality education in Texas schools. The mainly abstinence only programs of Texas receive evaluation on terms of accuracy of information, appropriateness of content and effectiveness. The report includes many examples from actual programs.

Contact: Texas Freedom Network, P.O. Box 1624, Austin, TX 78767, Telephone: (512) 322-0545 Fax: (512) 32-0550 E-mail: tfn@tfn.org Web Site: http://www.tfn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Curriculum development, Educational materials, Program evaluation, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Texas

Olsho L, Cohen J, Walker DK, Johnson A, Locke G. 2009. National survey of adolescents and their parents: Attitudes and opinions about sex and abstinence—Final report. Cambridge, MA: Abt Associates, 195 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the methodology and findings from a study conducted to examine current attitudes of parents and adolescents about sex and abstinence. The study was guided by the following research questions: (1) What are adolescent and parent attitudes concerning sex and abstinence? (2) How are attitudes of parents and their adolescents similar to or different from each other? (3) Adjusting for all other variables, what factors are independently associated with adolescents' attitudes toward sex and abstinence? The report also provides background and a brief review of existing literature and discusses implications of the findings.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Parents, Racial factors, Research

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.