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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Children's Bureau Publications

The U.S. Children's Bureau was established in 1912 with this charge: "The … bureau shall investigate and report … upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people, and shall especially investigate the questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile courts, desertion, dangerous occupations, accidents and diseases of children, employment, [and] legislation affecting children in the several States and Territories."

The documents below have been digitized from a collection of U.S. Children's Bureau publications from 1912 to 1969 in the MCH Digital Library, Georgetown University.  In addition, selected documents that discuss the history of the Children's Bureau are included, and links are provided to Children's Bureau documents from the period that have been digitized by other libraries.

The digitization project includes approximately 450 documents.


History of the Children's Bureau

Children's Bureau Brochures and Booklets for Parents

Children's Bureau Periodicals and Serials

Children's Bureau Publications

1912 – 1919

Establishment of the Children's Bureau. 1912. 5 pp.

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920 – 1929

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930 – 1939

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940 – 1949

1940

1941

1942

1943

1945

1946

1947

1948

1949

1950 – 1959

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

  1. Training under the Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Programs. 1954, 1956 20 pp.

1957

1958

1959

1960 – 1969

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970 – 1979

1980 – 1989

1981

1983

1989

1997

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.