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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (1,575 total).

Clark D. n.d.. Dietary score: Assessment tools and instructions. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health , 20 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a dietary assessment tool used by licensed dietitians for WIC applicants and participants. The tool is divided into four sections, which are: 1) dietary questions, 2) food frequency, 3) nutrition risk assessment, and 4) space for a nutrition care plan. Each section has blank forms and instructions and suggestions.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 Contact Phone: (515) 281-5787 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietitians, Food habits, Forms, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, WIC Program

Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department. n.d.. Using scientific evidence to improve information practice: The research policy statement of the Medical Library Association. Chicago, IL: Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement expresses the vision of the Medical Library Association (MLA) of research as a foundation for excellence in health information practice, for new and expanded roles for health sciences librarians, and for attracting excellent people to the profession. It also affirms the association's commitment to collaborate with other organizations to increase support for health sciences librarians' research activities. This policy does not include a laundry list of research topics, but seeks to provide an intellectual basis and rationale for the role of research in support of professional practice. The future role of health sciences librarians, the role that current health sciences librarians must play in achieving those, and the role of MLA in this are described. A proposed action plan outlines future directions for MLA under the headings education, research, support, funding, recognition, and measurement.

Contact: Medical Library Association, 225 East Wacker Place, Suite 650, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-9094 Fax: (312) 419-8950 E-mail: info@mlahq.org Web Site: http://www.mlanet.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Collaboration, Health sciences libraries, Librarians, Medical Library Association, Research

Weckwerth V. n.d.. One valuation: A tool or a tyranny—II. [Minneapolis, MN]: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 16 pp. (Comment series no: 9-11 (22))

Swartz JM. n.d.. Development of study of the nutritional status of children and youth registrants. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 46 pp. (Study series no.: 1-7 (16))

Annotation: This paper is a proposal for a study to make recommendations for improvement of delivery of nutritional services in programs supported by the Maternal and Child Health Service, as well as in the development of future programs. The need for such studies, the relationship of the Children and Youth Project, the purpose and design of the proposed study, development of the observation instrument, a pilot study, and summary of study modifications are presented. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health programs, Child nutrition, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Research, Title V programs

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

Snow C, Selman RL, Walker PC. n.d.. Voices reading: Literacy to live by—A comprehensive reading and character development program for grades K-2. Columbus, OH: Zaner-Bloser, 72 pp. (Program overview)

Annotation: This book presents the Voices Reading program, which combines systematic, comprehensive literacy instruction with character development. The program uses multicultural trade books as its basis and leveled books to match individual needs. The program addresses six themes: identity awareness, perspective taking, conflict resolution, social awareness, love and friendship, and freedom and democracy. In addition to explaining these themes, the book presents program components and a literacy overview, addresses the achievement gap, and discusses research and methods and scope and sequence.

Contact: Zaner-Bloser, 1201 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH 43215-3018, Telephone: (800) 421-3018 Secondary Telephone: (614) 486-0221 Web Site: http://zaner-bloser.com

Keywords: Character, Child development, Cultural competence, Educational attainment, Literacy education, Programs, Reading, Research

McMaster University and National Collaboration Centre for Methods and Tools. n.d.. Health evidence. Hamilton, ON: McMaster University and National Collaboration Centre for Methods and Tools,

Hammett M with Altman L, Severin C, Stillerman A, Villanueva C. 2019. Trauma-informed care and oral health: Recommendations for practitioners. Illinois ACEs Response Collaborative and Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is based on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, provides background on childhood adversity and trauma; outlines the connection between ACE and oral health outcomes; and describes methods that dentists and other oral health professionals can embed in their practice, teaching, and research to promote health in all domains: physical, mental, and social-emotional. Trauma, toxic stress, and resilience are discussed, and a list of oral health conditions associated with a history of trauma and adversity is included.

Contact: Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, 29 E. Madison Suite 602, Chicago, IL 60602-4404, Web Site: http://www.hmprg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health promotion, Oral health, Research, Resilience, Stress, Trauma

Rechmann P, Chaffe BW, Rechmann BMT, Featherstone JDB. 2019. CAMBRA: Caries Management by Risk Assessment—A comprehensive caries management guide for dental professionals. Sacramento, CA: California Dental Association, 42 pp.

Annotation: This guide for oral health professionals presents a series of three papers reporting Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA)–related research results and updates on clinical-practice CAMBRA implementation. The first paper discusses how the principles and philosophy of CAMBRA can be integrated into oral health practice. The second paper provides information for oral health professionals to use in treating children ages 6 and up. The third paper offers a caries-risk-assessment tool for use in managing dental caries and assessing risk in infants and children from birth through age 5.

Contact: California Dental Association, 1201 K Street, 14th Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (800) 232-7645 E-mail: contactcda@cda.org Web Site: http://www.cda.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease management, Infant health, Oral health, Research, Risk assessment, Young children

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2019. Data quality evaluation of the dental fluorosis clinical assessment data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004 and 2011-2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 25 pp. (Vital and Health Statistics; Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 183)

Annotation: This report provides a review of 1999–2004 and 2011–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dental fluorosis clinical assessment data. The report discusses methods related to NHANES oral health data, NHANES dental fluorosis clinical assessment, dental examiners, fluorosis clinical assessment, quality-assurance procedures, response and completion rates, and data evaluation. The report also provides results in the following categories: rater variability, agreement between dental and reference examiners in categorizing dental fluorosis, prevalence of dental fluorosis, assessing biologicial plausibility of prevalence estimates, impact of oversampling in NHANES, and impact of geographic variation in water fluoridation levels.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: PHS 2019-1383.

Keywords: Oral health, Fluoride, Research, Statistical data, Surveys

Surdu S, Langelier M, Dhar S, Stufflebeam M with Keough L. 2019. Consumer survey of barriers to and facilitators of access to oral health services. Albany, NY: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a survey conducted to evaluate factors that consumers identify as impacting their access to oral health services and to explore differences in utilization of oral health services by demographically distinct population groups. The report presents findings from the literature review and results of the study. Results are divided into the following categories: characteristics of survey respondents, perceived need for oral health services, utilization of oral health services among those indicating a need for such services, access to oral health services among those indicating a need for such services, and factors influencing utilization of oral health services among those indicating a need for such services.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care utilization, Oral health, Access to health care, Research, Surveys

Olson S, Wojtowicz A, Rapporteurs; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Roundtabl on Health Literacy. 2019. Integrating oral and general health through health literacy practices: Proceedings of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 102 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings summarize presentations and discussions from a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine workshop held on December 6, 2018. Topics include integration of oral health, primary care, and health literacy; systems thinking, integration, and health literacy as a catalyst; health literacy and care integration; exploring pathways to integration; developing a research agenda for integration; and reflections on the workshop.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Health literacy, Oral health, Primary care, Research, Service integration

Amah G, Jura M, Mertz E. 2019. Practice patterns of postgraduate dental residency completers from select long-term HRSA-funded primary dental care training programs. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Resource Center, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to examine practice patterns of graduates of primary care dental postgraduate training programs with a history of Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funding. The study aims were to assess the impact of graduates’ training experience on current practice patterns and subsequent patient access to care and to measure the long-term impact of these programs on improving dentists' capacity to meet the needs of those who are underserved. The report provides background and discusses study methods, findings, and limitations. A discussion of the findings, including information about policy implications, is included.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dental schools, Dentists, Graduate education, Low income groups, Oral health, Public policy, Research

Grantmakers in Health. 2019. Building an evidence-base for gun violence prevention: Research and data needs. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue focus discusses federal research restrictions on gun violence prevention, status of the evidence base, and priorities for future research. It also lists examples of programs on this issue that are funded privately.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Firearm safety, Gun control, Research, Violence prevention

DentaQuest. 2019. Reversible decay: Oral health is a public health problem we can solve. Boston, MA: DentaQuest, 13 pp. (Research report)

Annotation: This report provides information about a study conducted to learn about perspectives on oral health care in the United States. The study included five groups of stakeholders: patients, dentists, physicians, employers, and Medicaid dental administrators. The report discusses Americans’ satisfaction with the oral health care system, barriers to accessing oral health care, the relationship between access to oral health care and overall health, collaborative solutions, and the importance of prevention. Also discussed are the potential of expanded public health benefits to reduce barriers to accessing oral health care, benefits models, and value-based care initiatives.

Contact: DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: http://www.dentaquestpartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Prevention, Research

Surdu S, Langelier M. 2018. Trends in the provision of oral health services by federally qualified health centers. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Resource Center, 116 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes trends in the direct provision of oral health services by federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and factors that predict the likelihood of an FQHC offering direct general and/or specialty oral health services. The report provides background on the issue and presents methods, findings, and limitations of the study.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Health services, Low income groups, Oral health, Research, Statistical data

National Rural Health Association. [2017]. Compendium of rural oral health best practices. Kansas City, MO: National Rural Health Association, 23 pp.

Annotation: This compendium shares best practices, models, research, and policies from across the country to enhance access to high-quality oral health care in rural America. For each item, the following information is provided: contact information; a description of the program’s purpose; a detailed summary of the program; an overview of the program’s effectiveness, with specific examples; and the program’s funding source.

Contact: National Rural Health Association, 521 East 63rd Street, Kansas City, MO 64110, Telephone: (816) 756-3140 Fax: (816) 756-3144 E-mail: mail@NRHArural.org Web Site: http://www.ruralhealthweb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Best practices, Model programs, Public policy, Research, Rural population, Oral health

Manz M. 2017. Guidance on selecting a sample for a school-based oral health survey. Sparks, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document provides sampling guidelines for state and territorial health agencies and other jurisdictions planning to conduct a school-based oral health survey. Topics include appropriate sampling designs, steps for and examples of the sampling process, what to do if a school refuses to participate, and information about specialized data-analysis software.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Oral health, Research methodology, Schools, Surveys

Lorenzo SB, Pickett O. 2017. Maternal and child health literature and research databases: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Sama-Miller E, Akers L, Mraz-Esposito A, Zukiewicz M, Avellar S, Paulsell D, Del Grosso P. 2017. Home visiting evidence of effectiveness review: Executive summary. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 20 pp. (OPRE report no. 2017-29)

Annotation: This document provides an overview of the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review process and a summary of the review results. Contents include a summary of evidence of effectiveness by model and outcome domain, a summary of implementation guidelines for program models with evidence of effectiveness, and a discussion of gaps in the home visiting research literature. The appendix contains a list of the program models reviewed.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, MCH research, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.