Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (41 total).

March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center. 2015. 2015 premature birth report card. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, 4 pp.

Annotation: This annual report card measures the progress in reducing the nation's preterm birth rate by comparing each state's rate to the goal. Topics include prevention strategies and recommendations. Topics include women who are uninsured, late preterm birth, women who smoke, and preterm birth rates by race and ethnicity. Indicators, definitions, and data sources for the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are included. Information about the grading methodology is also provided. State fact sheets are also available.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Ethnic factors, Premature infants, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

McCoy C. 2014. State Title V program approaches to improving birth outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 24 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on efforts to reduce non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks gestation and methods that state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs are using to improve birth outcomes. Topics include national and state initiatives to make lowering the number of non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks a priority; the role of state Title V MCH programs in implementing quality improvement programs and payment reforms; and examples from California, North Carolina, and Texas. The appendix contains a matrix of national and regional initiatives to improve birth outcomes including a description, geographic scope, funding, and partners for each initiative.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, National initiatives, Prematurity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regional programs, Reimbursement, State MCH programs, Treatment outcome

Ohio Department of Health. (2013). Preventing infant mortality. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on efforts to prevent infant mortality in Ohio. It provides information about the Ohio Department of Health's (ODH's) safe sleep campaign, its progesterone prematurity project, its prenatal smoking-cessation initiative, and its decision to add severe combined immune deficiency and critical congenital heart disease to its list of newborn screening items. ODH's project to reduce elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation, its institute for equity in birth outcomes, and its support for select communities to participate in an initiative to improve black infant mortality and prematurity rates are also discussed.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal screening, Ohio, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention services, Public awareness campaigns, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020. 2013. Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator webinar: Maternal, infant, and child health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020, 1 video (ca. 35 min.).

Annotation: This webinar discusses Healthy People 2020 indicators for maternal, infant, and child health; specifically lowering rates of infant mortality and preterm or premature birth.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prematurity, Preterm birth

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2013. 2012 impact report: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a retrospective look at the work of the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition (HMHB) in 2012. Contents include program spotlights, donor recognition, a financial summary, and information about HMHB leadership. Topics include partnerships, premature infant health, perinatal nutrition, using technology and new media for maternal and child health, and oral health education.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coalitions, Fiscal management, Health education, Infants, Leadership, MCH programs, Mass media, Nutrition, Oral health, Outcome evaluation, Perinatal health, Pregnant women, Prematurity, Technology, Women

Pliska ES. 2013. Preventing prematurity. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document, which focuses on preventing premature birth, provides background about the issue and discusses the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials' Healthy Babies Initiative, which aims to help state health officials and their staff improve birth outcomes by reducing infant mortality and prematurity. The article also discusses states' support for policies to reduce premature birth rates and for building awareness of their state's prematurity rates and other maternal and child health issues,state progress toward addressing prematurity and other poor birth outcomes, and roles and opportunities for grantmakers.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Grants, Infant health, Premature infants, Prematurity, Public policy, State programs

MedImmune Advocacy. 2012. Premature infant summit: Collaborating for preemies: Small steps...big changes—Summary meeting report. [Gaithersburg, MD]: MedImmune, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information presented during a series of summits conducted by MedImmune Advocacy to examine the key issues facing premature infants and their families. The issues highlighted include public policy; concerns about the high rate of prematurity in the United States; the educational needs of parents; late preterm health issues; and the critical continuity of care for these infants after they leave the hospital. The report includes statistics on prematurity in the United States; describes clinical issues associated with prematurity; presents late-preterm infant health resources; describes advocacy initiatives; and examines the policy landscape and its impact on premature infant care. Also included are detailed descriptions of additional tools such as a premature infant advocacy training guide, a toolkit for the follow-care of premature infants, and a premature infant health website.

Contact: PreemieVoices.com, MedImmune Advocacy, 101 Orchard Ridge Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, Telephone: (301) 398-0000 Web Site: http://preemievoices.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Meetings, Premature infants, Prematurity, Reports

Dettinger J. 2012. Infant mortality among preterm infants by race/ethnicity. Seattle, WA: University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Maternal and Child Health, Leadership Program, 14 pp.

Annotation: This slide presentation about infant mortality among preterm infants by race and ethnicity provides statistics about infant mortality in the United States and in Washington state in graphical form. Methods, results, and a discussion are also presented. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Washington, School of Public Health, Box 357230, Seattle, WA 98195-3813, Telephone: (206) 543-1144 Fax: (206) 543-3813 E-mail: publichealth@uw.edu Web Site: http://sph.washington.edu/index.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Infant mortality, Prematurity, Racial factors, Research, State surveys, Statistical data, Washington

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Improving birth outcomes in the U.S.: State efforts to reduce prematurity. [Washington, DC]: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 62 pp.

Annotation: These presentation slides provide examples of how states can move forward in achieving the goal of prematurity reduction. The webinar, held on July 12, 2012, outlines the Healthy Babies Initiative to decrease prematurity in the United States by 8 percent by 2014. Presenters highlight the experience and strategies of two states that have met the challenge goal (Alaska and Vermont) and one state currently working toward that goal (Oklahoma).

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska, Oklahoma, Premature infants, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, State initiatives, Vermont

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Vision development and the link to overall development in the premature infant. Alexandria, VA: National Premature Infant Health Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 14)

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the most prevalent and significant issues involved in eye and vision care during the growth and development of premature infants. It discusses visual development, ocular growth in prematurity, and the condition known as retinopathy of prematurity resulting from the abnormal development of blood vessels. Autism warning signs which might manifest as visual cues (for example the lack of frequent eye contact by 2-3 months) are also presented. The webinar discusses the history of infant eye care and visual screening; the importance of early intervention; the various ways to test vision in infants; and the importance of addressing potential vision problems. An overview of InfantSEE -- a public health program designed to help ensure that eye and vision care becomes an integral part of infant wellness care -- is included as part of the presentation.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Community programs, Development, Growth, Infant health, Premature infants, Retinopathy of prematurity, Vision screening

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2012. Maternal, infant, and child health. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, (Leading health indicators webinar)

Annotation: This webcast is the third installment of the monthly "Who's Leading the Leading Health Indicators?" series. The series highlights organizations using evidence-based approaches to address a Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator (LHI) topic. The webcast provides an overview of the March LHI topic—maternal, infant, and child health—and provides information about maternal, infant, and child activities in DHHS's region IV. Also discussed is how the Kentucky Department of Public health, with the help of national, state, and local partners, has successfully combatted rising rates of premature birth.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Collaboration, Federal programs, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, Infant health, Kentucky, Local programs, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prevention, State programs, Trends, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Public health approaches to reducing U.S. infant mortality. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This 60-minute webcast explores public health approaches to reducing U.S. infant mortality. Topics include addressing racial disparities that still persist, especially in the African American and American Indian/Alaska Native populations, and preventable infant deaths continue to occur. Approaches discussed include addressing the social, behavioral, and health risk factors that affect birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, unsafe sleeping environments for infants, and tobacco smoke.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child death review, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal death, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Research, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep position, Smoking during pregnancy, Statistical data, Tobacco use

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. NPHIC webinar: Oklahoma Infant Alliance's later preterm infant toolkit. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mother, Healthy Babies Coalition, 1 podcast (49 min., 50 sec.). (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 15)

Annotation: This webinar discusses the Oklahoma Infant Alliance Late Preterm Infant Toolkit and its role in addressing the high rate of preterm deliveries in the state. The toolkit is meant for hospitals and agencies who work with the late preterm infant and discusses the development of a clinical practice guideline based on current evidence-based resources and research in reducing morbidities associated with late preterm birth.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Guidelines, Infant health, Oklahoma, Pregnancy complications, Prematurity, Preterm birth, State initiatives

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Texas and Louisiana: Healthy Start for more infants. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report presents case studies from Texas and Louisiana that illustrate innovative approaches that states are employing to help ensure that more children get a healthy start in life. The report provides background information on the complications often resulting from premature birth and discusses the essential features of Texas's Healthy Babies Initiative and Louisiana's Birth Outcomes Initiative. Resources for more information about the programs are provided.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Initiatives, Louisiana, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Prevention, State programs, Texas

Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network. 2011–. The state of life course health development research: Past, present and future. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, multiple items.

Annotation: This webinar series explores the state of life course health development research. Topics include life course and developmental health, chronic disease, oral health, chronic kidney disease, hearing health, type 2 diabetes mellitus in youth, and premature birth. A companion series on using existing data to examine life course health development is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, University of California, Los Angeles, 10990 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-2583 Fax: (310) 312-9210 E-mail: chcfc@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthychild.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Development, Life course, Prematurity, Preventive health services, Research

MedImmune, National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality. 2011. Toolkit for the follow-up care of the premature infant. [Gaithersburg, MD]: MedImmune; [Boston, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality],

Annotation: This electronic toolkit has been developed to assist healthcare providers in the transition of the premature infant from hospital to outpatient care, to facilitate the accurate transfer of patient information, and to help provide evidence‐based practical measures for consideration in the care of the premature infant The toolkit provides age‐specific information, highlighting what is unique for the premature infant from birth to 12 months (corrected for age). Sections include discharge planning, outpatient follow‐up care, parent/caregiver, and tools. Policy statements on hospital discharge from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), anticipatory guidance, Bright Futures well-child guidance and screening tables, and listings of specific medical issues complicating outcomes or premature infants and the role of role of primary physicians are included in the online interactive toolkit.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Hospital services, Infant care, Neonatal intensive care, Outpatient services, Patient discharge, Premature infants, Prematurity, Resources for professionals, Service integration

March of Dimes. 2011. Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait: Preventing preterm births through community-based interventions--An implementation manual. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes, 125 pp.

Annotation: This manual guides individuals and organizations in implementing the Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait (HBWW) initiative, a multi-dimensional, community-based approach to preventing preventable preterm births. It is designed for use by perinatal providers across disciplines and organizational settings through development of interdisciplinary, interagency collaborations. It focuses on partnerships and collaborations; provider initiatives; patient support; public engagement; and progress measurement. It also describes lessons learned from a pilot project of the HBWW in Kentucky.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Kentucky, Manuals, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, State initiatives

National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation. 2010. Preventing prematurity: Opportunities for health plans. [Washington, DC]: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation,

Annotation: This webinar convened health plans and leaders in the maternal and child health community who shared innovative programs and explored strategies to reduce preterm birth and the associated costs. Representatives from the March of Dimes, United Healthcare, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, and Text4Baby discussed health plan strategies to reduce prematurity. Topics included (1) challenges of preventing late preterm births, (2) a blueprint for transforming maternity care, (3) innovative strategies for health plans to become involved in Text4Baby, (4) United Healthcare strategies to prevent prematurity, and (5) models to impact low birthweight and infant mortality. The Web site provides the agenda, speaker biographies, PowerPoint presentations, an online evaluation survey, and an audio archive.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, MCH services, Multimedia, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, Programs

March of Dimes Foundation. 2009. Thinking about pregnancy after a premature birth. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes Foundation,

Annotation: This fact sheet is written for women who have had a premature infant and are concerned about having another. It provides information about what women and their health professionals can do to help ensure that women remain pregnant for a full 9 months.

Contact: March of Dimes Foundation, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (888) MODIMES Secondary Telephone: (914) 997-4488 E-mail: http://www.marchofdimes.com/contactus/contactus.html Web Site: http://www.modimes.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, High risk pregnancy, Pregnant women, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prevention, Risk factors, Treatment

Singer LT. [2008]. Psycho-social sequelae of BPD and VLBW: Phase (3) Three—[Final report]. Cleveland, Oh: Case Western Reserve University, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to investigate the early adolescent outcomes associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the leading chronic pulmonary disease of prematurity, with a particular focus on the influence of BPD relative to other medical, neurologic, and sociodemographic risk factors, on pulmonary, cognitive, language, neuropsychological, and behavioral outcomes. It also describes an investigation on family stressors associated with BPD and very low birthweight (VLBW). Contents include an introduction describing the research problem; purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation; a review of the literature; study design and methods; and a discussion and interpretation of findings. A list of references cited is included as well as a list of products produced during the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Family health, Final reports, MCH research, Premature infant diseases, Prematurity, Very low birth weight

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.