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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (11,400 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

American Council for Drug Education. n.d.. Drugs may harm your unborn baby: Only take drugs your doctor prescribes. Washington, DC: American Council for Drug Education, 1 poster (17 x 22 inches).

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control. n.d.. Parents of earth, are your children fully immunized? = Immunization: Star Wars. Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control, 1 p.

Annotation: This poster shows two Star Wars characters in a futuristic setting. The legend reads: "Parents of earth, are your children fully immunized? Make sure - Call your doctor or health department today. And may the force be with you."

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Immunization, Posters

Magrab P, Elder J, Kazuk E, Pelosi J, Wiegerink R. n.d.. Developing a community team: A companion to the community workbook for collaborative services to preschool handicapped children. Washington, DC: American Association of University Affiliated Programs for the Developmentally Disabled, 39 pp. (Workbook series for providing services to children with handicaps and their families)

Annotation: This book explains the steps needed to plan and implement collaboration between community programs, agencies and individuals who provides services to children with disabilities and their families. This book was reprinted by the Georgetown University Child Development Center as a part of the Workbook Series for Providing Services to Children with Handicaps and Their Families.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Interagency cooperation

Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services. n.d.. Family planning. Agana, GU: Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services, 1 videotape.

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Alcohol: Your child and drugs. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 p. (Teen health brochures)

Annotation: This brochure explains the developmental damage that can occur to adolescents from alcohol and emphasizes parent-child communication as one of the best ways of preventing this problem.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $15.00 for 100 copies, members; $20.00, nonmembers. Minimum order: 100 copies.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Communication

National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. n.d.. Meeting the medical bills. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 1 p., 1 videotape (VHS).

Annotation: This brochure describes a videotape by the same title that gives excerpts of a talk by Julie Beckett of Iowa on strategies for financing the health care needed by families of chronically ill children, and includes a glossary of terms used in the videotape. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (202) 638-0840 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Brochure available at no charge; videotape $10.95 from National Information Center for Handicapped Children and Youth, P.O. Box 1492, Washington, DC 20013.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Health care financing

MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program. n.d.. Working with your health insurance. Cleveland, OH: MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides information and forms to help families work with their health insurance companies. It includes questions to ask the insurance company and billing office, tips for keeping records of bills and claims, and who to talk with for assistance. A glossary of terms and list of publications on health insurance are included. Resource organizations in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio are also listed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered, community based care, Health care financing, Insurance, Medical records

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Food and Drug Administration. n.d.. Classroom help from the Food and Drug Administration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1 p.

Annotation: This publication list highlights the free educational materials available from the Food and Drug Administration for use in the classroom. The materials cover related health and nutrition issues, such as acne, anabolic steroids, snacking, and weight loss. A teacher's kit on health fraud with five lesson plans also is listed.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Eating disorders, Health promotion, Reyes syndrome, Scoliosis, Septic shock, Skin diseases

National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center. n.d.. A national goal: Building service delivery systems for children with special health care needs and their families—Family centered community based coordinated care. Iowa City, IA: National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the elements of a family-centered, community-based system for delivering health care for children with special health needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF061.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered community based care

National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. n.d.. Infancy in the eighties: Social policy and the earliest years of life. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 20 pp.

Annotation: This small pamphlet summarizes new knowledge about infant and toddler development and its impact on public policy. New research findings and clinical experience can be used to increase the effectiveness of legislation affecting children and families, programs for health screening, disease prevention and related issues for families, and public and private policies toward parents in the workplace.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (202) 638-0840 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org

Keywords: Family support services, Health policy, Infant health services, Policy development

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

McManus M, Kelly R, Newacheck P, Gephart J. n.d.. The role of Title V maternal and child health programs in assuring access to health services for adolescents. Washington, DC: McManus Health Policy, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a 1989 survey of state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs and children with special health needs (CSHN) programs with respect to their roles in serving adolescents. The publication brings together the results of adolescent health initiatives from both MCH and CSHN perspectives in order to examine how these programs might be better coordinated and strengthened. The survey revealed that most Title V-supported programs routinely bill Medicaid (and, to a lesser extent, private insurance) for some services. Limited revenues are received from insurance due to inadequate billing capacity, the type of services offered by Title V programs, and low reimbursement from Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child health, Insurance, Maternal health, Medicaid, Social Security Act, Special health care needs, Title V

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Selected federal maternal and child health information centers. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 14 pp. (What's new in...)

Prendergast A. n.d.. Planning comprehensive health services for the chronically ill/handicapped child: Need for nutrition component. Cincinnati, OH: Educational Television Services, 1 videotape.

Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation. n.d.. Public/private partnerships: A working model for children's health care. Pittsburgh, PA: Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation, 1 videotape (VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape describes the Caring Program for Children and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield's BlueCHIP program) in Pennsylvania. It depicts the health care needs of children living in poverty and children of the uninsured working poor who do not qualify for Medicaid assistance, and explains the unique funding of this collaborative program. Appearances by Fred Rogers of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and by local medical and government officials underscore the need for this type of program, the reasons for its success, and the ways that public and private resources can join together to help ensure access to primary health care for children. The videotape concludes with a television clip describing the program on NBC's "America Close Up." [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Corporate programs, Insurance, Local MCH programs, Medical assistance, Pennsylvania, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Videotapes

Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department. n.d.. Using scientific evidence to improve information practice: The research policy statement of the Medical Library Association. Chicago, IL: Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement expresses the vision of the Medical Library Association (MLA) of research as a foundation for excellence in health information practice, for new and expanded roles for health sciences librarians, and for attracting excellent people to the profession. It also affirms the association's commitment to collaborate with other organizations to increase support for health sciences librarians' research activities. This policy does not include a laundry list of research topics, but seeks to provide an intellectual basis and rationale for the role of research in support of professional practice. The future role of health sciences librarians, the role that current health sciences librarians must play in achieving those, and the role of MLA in this are described. A proposed action plan outlines future directions for MLA under the headings education, research, support, funding, recognition, and measurement.

Contact: Medical Library Association, 225 East Wacker Place, Suite 650, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-9094 Fax: (312) 419-8950 E-mail: info@mlahq.org Web Site: http://www.mlanet.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Collaboration, Health sciences libraries, Librarians, Medical Library Association, Research

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Tunick FL, Butterweck JE, Landman PD. n.d.. Parental evaluation of health care delivery in a children and youth project. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 9 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (31))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to describe a method used to assess community acceptance of a program to deliver comprehensive health care to children of low income families in New York City and to report the results. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs, Low income groups, New York, Program evaluation, Program evaluation, Questionnaires

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.