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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (288 total).

Clark D. n.d.. Dietary score: Assessment tools and instructions. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health , 20 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a dietary assessment tool used by licensed dietitians for WIC applicants and participants. The tool is divided into four sections, which are: 1) dietary questions, 2) food frequency, 3) nutrition risk assessment, and 4) space for a nutrition care plan. Each section has blank forms and instructions and suggestions.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 Contact Phone: (515) 281-5787 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietitians, Food habits, Forms, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, WIC Program

Gerald T. Rogers Productions. n.d.. Can you tell me—which foods are good?. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media, 1 videotape (10 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape uses puppet characters and human actors to educate children, ages 4 to 8, about selecting good foods and choosing well-balanced meals. The videotape discusses the four food groups and the videotape discussion guide provides an introduction to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guide pyramid. The discussion guide provides a brief description of the content, educational objectives, and suggested topics for discussion and activities. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Educational materials, Food pyramid, Materials for children, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Churchill Media. n.d.. Red Riding Hood and the well-fed wolf. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media, 1 videotape (16 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape uses the story of Little Red Riding Hood as the basis for teaching children, ages 8 to 12, about nutrition and good meals. Red Riding Hood reviews the wolf's eating habits and suggests healthier alternatives. The revised edition introduces the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guide pyramid. The discussion guide provides a brief summary, educational objectives, a small copy of the food guide pyramid, and suggested topics for discussion and follow-up activities.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-7932-3025.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Audiovisual materials, Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Educational materials, Food pyramid, Materials for adolescents, Materials for children, Videotapes

Churchill Media. n.d.. Look before you eat. (2nd ed).. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media, 1 videotape (24 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape, designed for adolescents in grades 7 to 12, reviews how eating habits have changed over the years and examines how food industry advertisements and promotions affect food choices. The videotape includes a scenario where high school students are evaluating their food choices and then are trying to devise healthier meals using foods lower in sugar, salt, and fat, and higher in calcium. It also discusses the role of processed, natural, and fast foods in nutrition. The discussion guide provides a summary of the videotape, educational objectives, topics for discussions, suggested activities, and related materials that may be useful.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown; also available on interactive videodisc.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Advertising, Audiovisual materials, Dietary guidelines, Educational materials, Fast food, Food habits, Food habits, Materials for adolescents, Videotapes

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

Harris JL, Fleming-Milici F, Frazier W, Haraghey K, Kalnova S, Romo-Palafox M, Seymour N, Rodriguez-Arauz, Schwartz MB. 2017. Nutrition and marketing of baby and toddler food and drinks. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 112 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the nutritional quality and other characteristics of food and drink products marketed to parents for their infants and toddlers (up to age 3). It also examines the messages used to promote these products, and evaluates how well they correspond to expert advice about feeding young children.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Consumer education, Evaluation, Feeding, Feeding, Food, Infants, Marketing, Toddlers

Ashbrook A, Hartline-Grafton H, Dolins J, Davis J, Watson C. 2017. Addressing food insecurity: A toolkit for pediatricians. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics and Food Research and Action Council, 38 pp.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help pediatricians and their practice teams screen for food insecurity, connect families with food and nutrition resources in the community, and support national and local policies that increase access to adequate healthy food for all children and their families. Contents include an infographic, information on food insecurity and federal nutrition programs, tips on preparing for and using the Hunger Vital Sign (a validated screening tool), interventions to address food insecurity, and resources to support advocacy and educational efforts.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Consumer education, Families, Federal programs, Food, Intervention, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutrition programs, Pediatric care, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Screening

Harris JL, Haraghey KS, Choi Y-Y, Fleming-Milici F. 2017. Parents' attitudes about food marketing to children: 2012 to 2015–Opportunities and challenges to creating demand for a healthier food environment. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of a survey of parents with children and adolescents ages 2 to 17 to measure parents' attitudes about food marketing and other influences on children's eating habits and their support for policies to promote healthy eating for their children. Topics include parents' opinions about food industry self-regulation, including the ages of children who should be protected from unhealthy food marketing and whether they believe that individual food companies have delivered on their pledges to limit food advertising to children. The report also examines parents' willingness to participate in a variety of actions to encourage companies to reduce unhealthy food marketing to their children. A series of infographics is also available.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Beliefs, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Consumer surveys, Food consumption, Marketing, Nutrition, Parent participation, Parenting attitudes, Policy development

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016. Winnable battles final report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report describes public health priorities with large-scale impact on health, known effective strategies to address them, and progress towards meeting targeted goals. Contents include visual representations of progress and data trends, as well as summaries of federal contributions associated with each of the following topic areas: tobacco; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; food safety; health care-associated infections; motor vehicle injuries; adolescent pregnancy; and HIV.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Food safety, Goals, HIV, Health, Infections, Motor vehicle safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Tobacco use, Treatments, Trends

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Piekarz E, Schermbeck R, Young SK, Leider J, Ziemann M, Chriqui JF. 2016. School district wellness policies: Evaluating progress and potential for improving children's health eight years after the federal mandate–Volume 4. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 184 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reports key findings from a comprehensive, ongoing, nationwide evaluation of written school district wellness policies. Contents include data from school years 2006–2007 through 2013–2014, the first eight years following the required implementation data for wellness policies. Topics include background on the federal requirement for school district wellness policies, methodology for assessing policy strength and district characteristics, comprehensiveness and strength of wellness policies, key findings of wellness policy provisions, and future research needs.

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Research and Policy, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, 5th Floor, Chicago, IL 60608-1264, Telephone: (312) 996-7222 Secondary Telephone: (866) 757-4507 Fax: (312) 996-2703 E-mail: IHRPinfo@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health policy, Nutrition education, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Regulations, Research, School districts, School food services, Trends

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. 2016. USDA food composition databases (rev.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, multiple items. (Released September 2015; slightly revised May 2016. (JMB))

Annotation: This website allows users to search U.S. Department of Agriculture food-composition databases, including the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and the Branded Food Products Database. Users can search the databases by food item, food group, or manufacturer's name to find the nutrient information for food items. Users can also generate lists of foods sorted by nutrient content. In addition, data from the Special Interest Databases are shown, along with the corresponding food items from the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Jamie L. Whitten Building, Room 302A, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250, Telephone: (202) 720-3656 Fax: (202) 720-5427 Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Federal programs, Food additives, Nutrients, Nutrition

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Friends of Children Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters: Poverty and child health–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 21 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of program summaries describes the approaches of American Academy of Pediatrics' state chapters to develop and implement programs focused on poverty and child health in California, New York City, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Topics include developing and using innovative technologies to address food insecurity, pediatricians promoting food security, ensuring the delivery of health and developmental screening services to young children who are homeless, supporting adolescent parents and their children, and accessing summer meal programs. Each summary includes information about program collaboration, evaluation and measurement, outcomes, barriers and lessons learned, and future plans.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, Developmental screening, Food, Health screening, Healthy People 2020, Homeless persons, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition, Poverty, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships

Wilson K, Charmchi P, Dworetzky B. 2016. State statutes & regulations on dietary treatment disorders identified through newborn screening. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, 82 pp.

Annotation: This chart provides information about state-specific legislation that mandates the coverage of medically necessary foods by employer-sponsored health insurance, Medicaid, and coverage and related services funded by other state programs such as the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); Title V; or relief funds. Contents include descriptions of medical foods products, abbreviations and definitions, a list of coverage types for dietary treatments of disorders identified through newborn screening, and a list of states that provide phenylketonuria (PKU) only coverage. Details about covered services and any benefit limits or age and income restrictions are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Diet therapy, Dietary assessment, Financing, Food supplements, Genetic disorders, Health insurance, Medicaid, Metabolic diseases, Newborn infants, Newborn screening, Nutrition, Phenylketonuria, Postnatal care, Regulations, Special health care needs, State legislation, State programs, Title V programs, Unfunded mandates, WIC program

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. SNAP-Ed strategies & interventions: An obesity prevention toolkit for states–Featuring evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental changes that support direct education and social marketing and ways to evaluate them across various settings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help states improve the likelihood that individuals with low incomes will make healthy food choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with current guidelines by providing nutrition education and obesity prevention services, using interventions that include direct education; social marketing; and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes. Contents include evidence-based obesity prevention programs and PSE strategies and interventions that states can use in their plans to comply with the requirement that plans include multi-level interventions or public health approaches. The toolkit includes a section on evaluation of interventions that may be considered along with evaluation recommendations and requirements.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence, Southern Region at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2016. SNAP-Ed toolkit: Obesity prevention interventions and evaluation framework. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) implementing agencies find evidence-based obesity prevention and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) interventions and learn about outcome indicators from the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. A glossary of terms from the framework is also included. An online resource center for state and local SNAP-Ed providers and a library for locating SNAP-Ed tools and resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Training, Weight management

First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, Healthy+Active Before 5. 2015–. Sugar Bites. Concord, CA: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are part of a public-awareness campaign aimed at preventing the development of chronic diseases by encouraging parents to choose water for their young child instead of drinks that are high in sugar. The resources focus on reducing children’s risk for obesity, tooth decay, and type 2 diabetes by reducing their consumption of flavored milk, juice drinks, soda, and sports drinks. Contents include brochures, posters, videos, and web graphics. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, 1485 Civic Court, Suite 1200, Concord, CA 94520, Telephone: (925) 771-7300 Web Site: http://www.first5coco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Consumer education materials, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluid intake, Food consumption, Local initiatives, Multimedia, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, Risk factors, Spanish language materials, Sugar, Water, Young children

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Growing Food Connections. 2015. Policy database. Buffalo, NY: University of Buffalo, SUNY, Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab,

Annotation: This database is a searchable collection of local public policies that explicitly support community food systems. The database provides examples of local public policies that have been adopted to address a range of food systems issues including rural and urban food production, farmland protection, transfer of development rights, food aggregation and distribution infrastructure, local food purchasing and procurement, healthy food access, food policy councils, food policy coordination, food system metrics, tax reductions and exemptions for food infrastructure. Contents include local laws, ordinances, resolutions, motions, orders, and directives, as well as plans, standards, guidelines, tax exemptions and other public financing policies. Policies span different geographic regions, sizes of government, rural and urban contexts, and public issues. In addition to general information about policy type, topic, and adoption date, the database includes policy documents, or the adopted language for each policy. When available, the database also lists information about the adopting, implementing, and supporting public agencies and non-governmental organizations; funding amount and sources; and policy outcomes.

Keywords: Databases, Financing, Food, Legislation, Local initiatives, Metrics, Nutrition, Policy development, Program coordination, Program planning, Public policy, Service delivery systems

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.