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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (158 total).

Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools. n.d.. Community schools: Promoting student success–A rationale and results framework. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document for local policymakers and practitioners provides guidance on implementing a community school strategy. It outlines a rationale for the community school as a primary vehicle for increasing student success and strengthening families and community. The document also defines specific results that community schools seek -- both in terms of how they function and in relationship to the well being of students, families, and communities. Contents include the community schools vision, guiding principles, logic model, and framework for student success. Conditions for learning and indicators of capacity are also addressed.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Development, Education, Families, Leadership, Learning, Models, Program improvement, Schools, Students, Teaching

Action for Healthy Kids. n.d.. Classroom energizers and brain breaks. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This document provides tips on ways to include fitness breaks in school and resources available to help schools get started. Contents include ideas for classroom activity breaks, using music, suggestions for middle and high school students, tips on involving physical education teachers, and asking students to share their physical activity break ideas.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Young Invincibles. 2020. Linking young adults to mental health services through social media and campus-based peer advocacy. Washington, DC: Young Invincibles; San Francisco, CA: Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Resource Center, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes two projects to reduce the barriers of stigma and access to care for college students with mental health concerns: a digital ad awareness campaign and a campus-based initiative meant to expand existing services. Recommendations are included for those wishing to replicate these projects. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Young Invincibles, 1411 K Street, N.W., Fourth Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 734-6519 E-mail: questions@younginvincibles.org Web Site: https://younginvincibles.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, College health services, College students, Mental health services, Young adults

Action for Healthy Kids. 2019. Recess for learning. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information and tips on providing and advocating for recess to improve learning and school health. Topics include advocating for more, better, and active recess; recess before lunch; making recess inclusive; playground design; and recess for secondary students. Resources are included.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Equal opportunities, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Action for Healthy Kids. 2019. Before and after-school activities. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 2 pp. (Tip sheet)

Annotation: This document provides tips on helping children get 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day by engaging them in before- and after-school activities. Contents include information and resources on out-of-school time programs and walk and bike to school initiatives, tips on starting a walking or running club, and encouraging student involvement in intramural programs.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, After school programs, Learning, Participation, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice. 2019. The OHNEP undergraduate interprofessional oral health faculty tool kit: Resources & stragies for oral health integration. New York, NY: Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice, 30 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for undergraduate faculty provides curricula templates and resources that can be used when integrating oral health into an undergraduate nursing program. Topics include microbiology, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, research methods, pharmacology, health assessment and promotion, fundamentals, nursing care of adults and older adults, nursing care of children, maternity and women’s health, community, psychiatric-mental health, leadership in nursing, and professional nursing. Smiles for Life: A National Oral Health Curriculum is integrated throughout the toolkit.

Contact: Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice, 433 First Avenue, Sixth Floor, New York, NY 10003, Telephone: (212) 992-7023 E-mail: OHNEP@nyu.edu Web Site: https://ohnep.org Available from the website.

Keywords: College students, Curricula, Health promotion, Nursing education, Oral health, Service integration

Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign. [2017?]. Framework for action: Addressing nutrition and physical activity through ESSA implementation. Chicago, IL: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Healthy Schools Campaign, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a supplement to “State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action.” This supplement provides more detailed recommendations for supporting nutrition and physical activity during the school day through the Every Student Succeeds Act implementation.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org

Keywords: Nutrition, Adolescent health, Child health, Physical activity, School age children, School health programs, Students

Pudelski S. 2017, 2018. Cutting Medicaid: A prescription to hurt the neediest kids. Alexandria, VA: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 11 pp. (addendum 4 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of school leaders about how service delivery and student health would be impacted by a decline in Medicaid reimbursement. The report outlines the survey questions and findings, highlights how students with disabilities and students with low incomes will be impacted by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant, describes how communities will be economically affected by a per-capita cap or Medicaid block grant for school districts, details the potential of districts to lose critical mental health supports for students that are reimbursable by Medicaid, and notes how district efforts to expand Medicaid coverage to students and their families will be undermined by a block grant or per-capita cap.

Contact: AASA, The School Superintendents' Association, 1615 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 578-0700 Fax: (703)-841-1543 E-mail: info@aasa.org Web Site: http://www.aasa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Block grants, Child health, Children, Financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, National surveys, Policy development, Reimbursement, School age children, School districts, Service delivery, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Mann R, Mays A. 2017. State ESSA plans to support student health and wellness: A framework for action (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on developing state plans for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in ways that support student health and wellness. Topics include engaging stakeholders in a way that ensures an effective ESSA state plan is developed and implemented; implementing a state accountability system and creating a school report card that supports the health and learning connection; integrating health and wellness into standards, assessments, and a well-rounded education; integrating student learning through staff wellness and professional development; supporting the transition from early childhood programs to elementary school; transferring funding to strengthen ESSA health and wellness programming; the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant; and looking ahead. For each topic, the document outlines why it's important, what the law says, action steps, and resources. An overview of ESSA is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Accountability, Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Federal initiatives, Financing, Grants, Learning, Needs Assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Service integration, Standards, Statewide planning, Students, Transitions

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

Hall E. 2017. Identifying a school quality/student success indicator for ESSA: Requirements and considerations. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements for the inclusion of a school quality or student success indicator (referred to as the "5th indicator), including requirements to ensure that the indicator contributes to a state's system of school and district accountability. Highlights include key factors to consider when identifying, evaluating, and implementing a school quality or student success indicator for inclusion in a state's accountability system. Examples of school quality and student success indicators and research supporting those indicators are included.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Evaluation, Limited English speakers, Measures, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regulations, School districts, Schools, Students, Systems development

Sweetland J, Gibbons C, Vo C. 2017. Reframing school discipline: A strategic communications playbook. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines 12 evidence-based framing strategies that communicators in the education, justice, and civil rights sectors can use to challenge exclusionary discipline policies, build support for reducing racial disparities in disciplinary outcomes, and cultivate awareness of alternative approaches such as restorative justice and trauma-informed schools.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Communication, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Schools, Stress, Students, Trauma

Schubel J. 2017. Medicaid helps schools help children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the role of Medicaid in funding critical health-related services for students with disabilities. Topics include providing reimbursement for health care services that are necessary for students with disabilities to succeed in school and ensuring schools' compliance with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requirements, helping students to stay healthy and succeed academically, and connecting students to coverage. The brief also describes the long-term benefits of Medicaid for eligible children and the potential impact of spending reductions on students, local communities, and state budgets. The appendix contains a table on state and federal Medicaid spending in schools.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Role, School health services, Schools, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

Oakes J, Maier A, Daniel J. 2017. Community schools: An evidence-based strategy for equitable school improvement. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center and Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the research on community schools, with two primary emphases. First, it explores whether the 2015 federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) opens the possibility of investing in well-designed community schools to meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in high-poverty schools. And second, it provides support to school, district, and state leaders as they consider, propose, or implement a community school intervention in schools targeted for comprehensive support. An online research compendium summarizing the referenced studies referenced is also available.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Web Site: https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Collaboration, Community based services, Community development, Costs, Federal legislation, Intervention, Leadership, Policy analysis, Poverty, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Service integration, Students, Vulnerability

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Anti-bullying policies and enumeration: An infobrief for local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief for local education agency staff describes enumeration in the context of anti-bullying policies, referring to any specific listing of traits or characteristics of students that could be the basis of bullying. Topics include support for and concerns about enumeration, research on the effectiveness of enumerating anti-bullying policy, and key considerations and actions for effective implementation of all anti-bullying policies.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Local government, Policy development, Public policy, Research, School districts, State legislation, Students

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. 2016. 2013-2014 civil rights data collection: A first look–Key data on equity and opportunity gaps in our nation's public schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes results from a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States to measure student access to courses, programs, instructional and other staff, and resources that impact education equity and opportunity for students. Topics include school climate factors such as student discipline and bullying and harassment. Additional topics include restraint and seclusion, early learning, college and career readiness, chronic student absenteeism, education in justice facilities, and teacher staffing and equity.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-1100, Telephone: (800) 421-3481 Fax: (202) 453-6012 E-mail: OCR@ed.gov Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data analysis, Discipline, Equal opportunities, Learning, Measures, Public education, Public schools, School districts, Students

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.