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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (37 total).

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

O'Hare WP, Mayol-Garcia Y, Wildsmith E, Torres A. 2016. The invisible ones: How Latino children are left out of our Nation's census count. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends Hispanic Institute and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund,

Annotation: This report identifies issues associated with the undercount of young Hispanic children in the U.S. Census and provides recommendations to improve the accuracy of the count in the next census. Contents include information about the net undercount of young Latino children by state and by county, drivers of the undercount, and strategies to reduce it by 2020. Topics include identifying and pursuing research questions, developing networks that will reach households with young children, raising awareness among stakeholders, targeting outreach to locations with concentrations of Latino families, leveraging government programs that serve children and existing partnerships with local organizations, and reaching out to health professionals and families of preschoolers.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Hispanic Americans, Neighborhoods, Networking, Outreach, Participation, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention. 2015. Dating Matters® Initiative. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about a comprehensive dating violence prevention initiative focused on adolescents ages 11 to 14 in high-risk, urban communities. Contents include a video that describes the initiative and information about funding for implementation in middle schools and neighborhoods. The website also provides information about online training and profiles of grantees in Baltimore, MD; Chicago, IL; Ft. Lauderdale, FL: and Oakland, CA.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, Cities, Comprehensive programs, Financing, Health promotion, Injury prevention, Middle schools, National initiatives, Neighborhoods, Relationships, Training, Violence prevention

Tsao B, Davis RA. 2015. Community safety by design: Preventing violence through land use. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 43 pp.

Annotation: This paper looks at the relationship between land use and violence prevention including the extent to which violence prevention is considered in land use planning. It analyzes implications of the state of practice and makes recommendations for creating safer communities. Topics include influencing policy and legislation and changing organizational practices, fostering coalitions and networks, educating providers, promoting community education, and strengthening individual knowledge and skills. Sample strategies from the field are included.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Neighborhoods, Planning, Policy development, Safety, Violence prevention

Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management. 2014. diversitydatakids.org. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information on the demographics of children and families in the United States, key factors that drive child outcomes, and issues of racial/ethnic socioeconomic equity in child health and wellbeing. Users can query, compare, and analyze data by race and ethnicity; compare data across states, metropolitan areas, counties, large cities, and large school districts; explore metropolitan area maps of the Child Opportunity Index; and obtain equity assessments of social policies affecting children. Fact sheets are also available.

Contact: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 415 South Street MS 035, Waltham, MA 02454-9110, Telephone: (781) 736-3820 Web Site: http://heller.brandeis.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Neighborhoods, Racial factors, Social policy, Socioeconomic status, Statistics

Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count. 2014. Race for results: Building a path to opportunity for all children. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 32 pp. (KIDS COUNT policy report)

Annotation: This report explores the intersection of children, race, and opportunity. Features include the Race for Results index, which compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups at the national and state levels. Topics include 12 indicators that measure a child's success in each stage of life, from birth to adulthood, in the areas of early childhood; education and early work; family supports; and neighborhood context. Policy recommendations are included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Education, Ethnic groups, Family support, Infants, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, Work force, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2014. The health and well-being of children: A portrait of states and the nation 2011-2012. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 108 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents indicators of the health and well-being of children, the supportive and risk factors in the family environment, and aspects of the neighborhood that may support or threaten families and children. The indicators present basic information on the health status and risk and protective factors experienced by children on the national level, and show the subpopulations who are at particular risk in each area, highlighting those differences that are statistically significant. This is followed by a presentation of key indicators on the state level for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A technical appendix at the end of the book presents summary information about the survey methodology and sample in summary form. Infographics are also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Families, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Statistical data

Moore KA, Sacks VH. 2014. Profiles of adolescents who are not in good health. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 13 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief uses data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health to examine the characteristics of adolescents whose parents rated their health as fair or poor, and compares those with the characteristics of adolescents who are described by their parents to be in better health. Contents include findings on adolescent health status by state and by race/ethnicity. The brief also presents information on the characteristics of adolescents' families and neighborhoods by adolescent health status. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Comparative analysis, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Family income, Health insurance, Health status, Individual characteristics, Neighborhoods, Special health care needs, Weight

Cooper M, Murphey D. 2014. Neighborhood characteristics and children's physical activity. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 12 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief examines the relationship between physical exercise and neighborhood characteristics among children and adolescents, using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. The authors examine, in each state, the average number of days children ages 6 to 17 exercised in the past week. They also look at the frequency within each state of selected neighborhood characteristics: whether the child's neighborhood included a playground or recreation center, whether it had dilapidated housing, and whether parents felt their child was "usually" or "always" safe there. The brief also examines which of these characteristics were associated with a higher average number of days of exercise, when other factors affecting exercise frequency are taken into account.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Household safety, Neighborhoods, Physical activity, Playground safety, Recreational safety

National Library of Medicine. 2013–. Tox Town. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides an introduction to toxic chemicals and environmental health risks that individuals may encounter in everyday life and in everyday places. Users can use the neighborhoods page to learn about the location of chemicals and their related health risks. Additional contents include curriculum units and other resources that teachers can use to stimulate classroom learning about environmental-health-related issues and careers. The resource is available in English and Spanish. A text version is also available.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Curricula, Environmental health, Health occupations, Multimedia, Neighborhoods, Risk factors, Toxicology

Reynolds JC. 2013. Neighborhood and family social capital and oral health status of children in Iowa. Iowa City: IA: University of Iowa, 84 pp.

Annotation: This report examines data from the 2010 Iowa Child and Family Household Health Survey on the association between child oral health status and social capital at the family and neighborhood levels. Contents include findings from a literature review, study methods and results, and a discussion. Topics include the conceptual framework integrating social capital and health behavior theory and conceptual models of influences on child oral health. This cross-sectional study on a generalizable sample of Iowa households found that neighborhood social capital and the frequency of families eating meals together, a component of family social capital, have significant independent relationships with the oral health of children in Iowa.

Contact: University of Iowa, 2222 Old Hwy 218 S #178 MBSB, Iowa City, IA 52242-1602, Telephone: (319) 335-3500 Web Site: http://www.uiowa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communities, Environmental influences, Families, Health behavior, Iowa, Neighborhoods, Oral health, State surveys, Statistical data

Comey J, Tatian PA, Freiman L, Winkler MK, Hayes C, Franks K, Jordan R. 2013. Measuring performance: A guidance document for Promise Neighborhoods on collecting data and reporting results. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 261 pp.

Annotation: This guidance is designed to help Promise Neighborhoods implementation grantees collect and assemble indicators to benchmark and track progress over time. Contents include an overview of data collection and use, the structure of a data system, indicators, core elements of the case management system, ensuring confidentiality and data security, neighborhood and school climate surveys, and neighborhood- and school-level data.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Promise Neighborhoods, LBJ Building, Room 4W338, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-5970, Telephone: (202) 453-6615 Fax: (202) 401-4123 E-mail: promiseneighborhoods@ed.gov Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/promiseneighborhoods/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Case management, Community development, Confidentiality, Data, Data collection, Family support programs, Federal initiatives, Information systems, Measures, Neighborhoods, Outcome and process assessment, School surveys, Schools, Systems development

Olson S; Institute of Medicine, Committee on From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Anniversary Workshop and National Research Council. 2012. From neurons to neighborhoods: An update—Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 55 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a summary of a workshop held by the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council on October 27–28, 2010, in Washington DC, to review and commemorate a decade of advances related to the mission of the report, From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, released on October 3, 2000. It discusses research and policy issues.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available at no charge from the website after registration; $33 plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-20978-6.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Learning, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Parent child relations, Public policy, Relationships, Research, Stress, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Bringing it all together: Addressing infant mortality through Best Babies Zones. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 webcast (60 min.). (Funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. (JMB))

Annotation: This webinar, held on September 18, 2012, provides an overview of the Best Babies Zones Initiative. The initiative embraces a lifecourse perspective and works to transform communities, improve birth outcomes, and reduce infant mortality. The webinar discusses the primary strategies of the initiative, as well as anticipated challenges and opportunities.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Economic factors, Education, Families, Health, High risk groups, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Prevention, Programs, Schools

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. 2012. Measuring child well-being at the neighborhood level. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago,

Annotation: This webcast focused on the challenges that community-based organizations face in accessing data and potential strategies for addressing these challenges. The speakers discuss the improved ability to measure child well-being at the neighborhood level and how to make sense of a seemingly overwhelming supply of data for effective decision making by policymakers and practitioners invested in child well-being.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Communities, Neighborhoods, Public policy, Statistical data

Grantmakers in Health. 2011. Supporting children's healthy development: Place DOES matter. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief examines how communities where children live contribute to their healthy development. It describes how community-level factors such as education, employment, housing, neighborhood conditions,and access to quality care care -- the social determinants of health -- have a powerful influence on child health outcomes. The brief describes how success can be achieved using place-based approaches to child health outcomes and how investing in intensive place-based strategies is a promising way to tackle the factors that influence individual and community health outcomes. Examples of efforts taking place at the local level are included.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community programs, Education, Employment, Factor analysis, Life course, Local initiatives, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Research, Socioeconomic factors

Jacob BA, Ludwig J, Miller DL. 2011. The effects of housing and neighborhood conditions on child mortality. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17369)

Annotation: This paper estimates the causal effects of child mortality from moving into less distressed neighborhood environments. The authors matched mortality data to information on every child in public housing that applied for a housing voucher in Chicago in 1997 and analyzed the effects of being offered a housing voucher on overall mortality rates. The paper introduces the issue; presents a conceptual framework and discussion of previous literature; discusses background, data, and methods; and presents results. The paper also addresses a methodological issue that may arise in studies of low-probability outcomes—perfect prediction by key explanatory variables.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Child mortality, Environmental influences, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Poverty, Families, Research

California Endowment. 2010. Healthy communities matter: The importance of place to the health of boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights how the neighborhoods where Latino and African-American boys and young men grow up directly influence their health outcomes. It examines racial and ethnic disparities -- and the magnitude of these disparities -- between boys and young men of color and white boys and young men across four broad areas: health, safety, socioeconomic, and ready-to-learn. The report analysis and findings point to the need for comprehensive policy solutions implemented at the community level in order to reduce such disparities. Examples of promising programs in communities across the country are provided.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Life course, Male children, Minority health, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Underserved communities, Young men

Brooks J, Gluck N, Lee M, Lizardo R, Marsh D, Serang F, Jeter J. 2010. The promise of a healthy California: Overcoming the barriers for men and boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report uses previously documented trends illustrating racial disparities and their impact within communities to assess the context of systemic failures within the state of California and to explore solutions that address the importance of place in the quality of an individual's life. The report details the insights and lessons gleaned from research done by Harvard University’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice; highlights successful practices; explores the elements that contribute to effective advocacy and public support; and makes recommendations for policy change and intervention. It argues for community-led approaches that will enhance the lives of African American and Latino boys and men, recognizing that social, physical, economic, and environmental factors are all connected.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Blacks, Communities, Community action, Data trends, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Male children, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.