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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (116 total).

Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation. n.d.. Public/private partnerships: A working model for children's health care. Pittsburgh, PA: Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation, 1 videotape (VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape describes the Caring Program for Children and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield's BlueCHIP program) in Pennsylvania. It depicts the health care needs of children living in poverty and children of the uninsured working poor who do not qualify for Medicaid assistance, and explains the unique funding of this collaborative program. Appearances by Fred Rogers of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and by local medical and government officials underscore the need for this type of program, the reasons for its success, and the ways that public and private resources can join together to help ensure access to primary health care for children. The videotape concludes with a television clip describing the program on NBC's "America Close Up." [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Corporate programs, Insurance, Local MCH programs, Medical assistance, Pennsylvania, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Videotapes

Irwin HP, Pellegrini SG, Fei R. n.d.. A study of the process, effectiveness, and costs of the EPSDT program in southeastern Pennsylvania: Interim report. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Health Management Corporation, 126 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 105)

Annotation: This interim report covers the first nine months of a two-year study of data collected by the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program in southeastern Pennsylvania, dealing primarily with a description of a large secondary data set. It describes the program, eligibles and clients, and providers. Also included are a project abstract, a review of some of the relevant literature on other studies of EPSDT projects, and the research design.

Keywords: EPSDT, Pennsylvania, Reports, State programs

Pennsylvania Department of Health, Bureau of Health Promotion Risk Reduction. 2019. Pennsylvania oral health surveillance plan 2019-2024. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report includes information about the Pennsylvania oral health surveillance plan, the purpose of which is to provide a source of reliable and valid information for monitoring oral health status in the state. Topics include a framework for a state oral health surveillance system, oral health indicators, data sources, resources, data dissemination and use, privacy and confidentiality, and evaluation.

Contact: Pennsylvania Department of Health, Health and Welfare Building, 625 Forster Street, Eighth Floor West, Harrisburg, PA 17120, Telephone: (877) 724-3258 Web Site: http://www.health.pa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Oral health, Pennsylvania, State programs, State surveys, Statistical data

Pennsylvania Department of Health. 2018. Pennsylvania oral health plan 2017-2020. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 75 pp.

Annotation: This oral health plan is intended to serve as a blueprint for how efforts by multiple stakeholders, resources, and interests can be combined to strengthen Pennsylvania's capacity to prevent oral disease and to help individuals with oral disease achieve good oral health. The purpose and development of the plan, goals and priorities, and the methodology are discussed. Other topics include risk factors for oral disease in Pennsylvania, access to oral health care, oral health work force development, oral health infrastructure, and plan implementation and evaluation.

Contact: Pennsylvania Department of Health, Health and Welfare Building, 625 Forster Street, Eighth Floor West, Harrisburg, PA 17120, Telephone: (877) 724-3258 Web Site: http://www.health.pa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Prevention, State programs

Murphy, C., Cohen, S., Lambiaso, B., Chavez, S. . 2018. Early childhood data in action: Stories from the field. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality; Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document provides case studies on how communities are using their early childhood data to tailor more effective interventions and yield better results. The case studies include: (1) Indianola, MS: organizing the community around the collective goal of having children ready to learn when entering kindergarten; (2) Ventura, CA: improving the quality of early childhood services, focusing on the overall family experience and engaging a consultant to help work with neighborhood partners to achieve data-driven change; and (3) Philadelphia, PA: informing critical public policy decisions by using data to decide which neighborhoods would get new pre-kindergarten slots under a new funding stream.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Data, Early childhood education, Local programs, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Program improvement, Young children

Boyes S, Davis L, Adams G, Mills M, Deutchman M. 2017. MORE Care: Narrowing the rural interprofessional oral health care gap. Westborough, MA: DentaQuest Institute, 35 pp., exec. summ. (10 pp.)

Annotation: This paper provides information about initiating interprofessional networks that integrate and coordinate person-centered oral health care in rural communities. Topics include oral health as a national issue with rural implications, interprofessional practice and the oral-systemic health connection, creating networks and a learning collaborative, state offices of rural health and medical-oral expanded care initiation, and challenges and opportunities for innovation. Examples from Colorado, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina are included.

Contact: DentaQuest Partnership for Oral Health Advancement, 465 Medford Street, Boston, MA 02129-1454, Telephone: (617) 886-1700 Web Site: http://www.dentaquestpartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Health care delivery, Information systems, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Program coordination, Provider networks, Rural environment, Rural health, Rural populations, Service integration, South Carolina, State initiatives, Systems development, Technology, Work force

Martin AB, Probst JC, Jones KM. 2017. Improving rural oral health: Six states’ response to the United States Department of Health and Human Services oral health strategic framework. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 15 pp. (Findings brief)

Annotation: This brief explores how six states from different regions of the country (Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina) have responded to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Oral Health Strategic Framework. For each state, background information is provided, along with a summary of how the state is improving access to oral health care and advancing oral health interprofessional practice.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oral health, Pennsylvania, Service Integration, South Carolina, State programs

Pennsylvania Medical Society and Pennsylvania Dental Association. 2016. Pennsylvania guidelines on the use of opioids in dental practice. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 4 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended to help health professionals improve patient outcomes and avoid potential adverse outcomes associated with using opioids to treat acute dental pain. Contents include how to incorporate key practices into caring for patients receiving opioids for pain.

Contact: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 777 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 8820, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8820, Telephone: (717) 558-7750 Secondary Telephone: (800) 228-7823 Fax: (717) 558-7830 E-mail: stat@pamedsoc.org Web Site: https://www.pamedsoc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Dental care, Dentistry, Opiates, Oral health, Pain, Palliative treatment, Patient care, Pennsylvania, Treatment outcome

Chazin S, Mahadevan R. 2014. Care at birth and beyond: Analysis of high-volume Medicaid pediatric and obstetric practices. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the characteristics, quality of care, and quality improvement activities of Medicaid-contracted pediatric and obstetric practices in the fee-for-service or primary care case management delivery systems in Iowa, Arkansas, and Pennsylvania. Although drawn from the experiences of just three states, the study findings presented in the report suggest opportunities for quality improvement in Medicaid pediatric and obstetric care in states across the country. Measures reported by states and pediatric preventive care scores (compared to national averages) are displayed in exhibit tables, and key data findings from individual states are presented as spotlights.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arkansas, Case management, Comparative analysis, Iowa, Measure, Medicaid, Obstetrical care, Pediatrics, Pennsylvania, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service delivery systems, State initiatives, data

Simons D, Hendricks T, Lipper J, Pires SA. 2014. Intensive care coordination using high-quality wraparound for children with serious behavioral health needs: State and community profiles. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document profiles the various ways that U.S. states and communities are structuring, implementing, and evaluating intensive care coordination (ICC) using the wraparound approach for children and youth with significant mental health conditions. The document defines wraparound as a structured approach to service planning and care coordination for individuals with complex needs that is built on a system of care and adheres to specified procedures. Contents include the evidence base for wraparound and information on established, evolving, and emerging ICC/wraparound programs.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Colorado, Community programs, Coordination planning, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mental health, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Patient care, Pennsylvania, Program coordination, Rhode Island, Service coordination, State programs, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Youth

Foster L. 2014. How are CHIPRA quality demonstration states testing the Children's Electronic Health Record Format?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 7 pp. (National evaluation of the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant Program: Evaluation highlight no. 10)

Annotation: This document is the 10th in a series that presents findings from the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant Program. It focuses on the roles of two states -- North Carolina and Pennsylvania --to test the Children's Electronic Health Record (EHR) Format (the Format) to improve the quality of health care for children enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP. Contents include key messages, background, findings, conclusion, and implications. Topics include how well the Format's requirements support the provision of primary care to children and how readily the requirements can be incorporated into existing EHRs.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Demonstration programs, Medicaid, Medical records, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State programs

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2013. Preventing bullying in schools through partnerships (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Promising practices: Women, children, and adolescents)

Annotation: This updated policy brief provides information about the Highmark Foundation bullying-prevention initiative within its Highmark Healthy High 5 project. The brief describes how Highmark worked to help schools in a 49-county area of Pennsylvania implement the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Mental health, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Schools, State initiatives

Matone M, Curtis C, Chesnokova A, Yun K, Kreider A, Curtis M, Rubin D. 2013. Evaluation of maternal and child home visitation programs: Lessons from Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, PA: PolicyLab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 15 pp. (Evidence to action)

Annotation: This policy brief highlights key concepts to guide state and local maternal and child home visitation program administrators as they make decisions about ongoing or planned program evaluation, as well as strategies for addressing some of the challenges tied to real-world program evaluation. Topics include an overview of public health program evaluation, a short description of what was learned from PolicyLab's evaluation of the Pennsylvania Nurse-Family Partnership program, and a discussion of how the findings can be meaningful for the broader home-visitation community. Contents include data sources for quasi-experimental evaluation.

Contact: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4399, Telephone: (215) 590-1000 Web Site: http://www.chop.edu/consumer/index.jsp .

Keywords: Case studies, Child health, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maternal health, Pennsylvania, Program evaluation

Ferry GA, Ireys HT, Foster L, Devers KJ, Smith L. 2013. How are CHIPRA demonstration states approaching practice-level quality measurement and what are they learning?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp. (National evaluation of the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant Program: Evaluation highlight no. 1)

Annotation: This report discusses early accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned from four states (Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania) that are pursuing practice-level quality measurements aimed at improving child health care under the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant Program. The report describes the states’ efforts to select meaningful measures, adapt health plan and state-level measures for practice-level reporting, and use technology to collect measurement data.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Data collection, Demonstration programs, Maine, Massachusetts, Measures, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, State programs

Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Sontag-Padilla LM, Lovejoy SL, Firth R, Pincus HA. 2013. Transforming systems for parental depression and early childhood developmental delays: Findings and lessons learned from the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative. [Santa Monica, CA]: Rand Corporation, 166 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an evaluation of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative of the Allegheny County Medical and Child Health Care Collaborative, an initiative to implement improvements to the local system of maternal and child health care. Report contents include an introduction to the initiative and its focus on maternal depression in low-income populations, system challenges, and a review of the need for a cross-system response in Allegheny County. Additional chapters discuss the methods for studying the initiative's framework, implementation, strategies, and evaluation; results and assessments on services, systems, and individuals; a discussion of lessons learned and limitations; as well as conclusions, recommendations, and next steps. Appendices include assessments, tools, outcome measure linkages, and reference studies.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-7857-5.

Keywords: Case studies, Families, Family child relations, Health services delivery, Maternal mental health, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression, Program evaluation, Screening

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2013. Overcoming common evaluation challenges. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign, 1 video (59 min., 32 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar presentation, broadcast April 9, 2013, describes how evaluations are critical in verifying that home visiting programs are delivering on the promises of improved outcomes for children and families and wise use of dollars. It highlights common challenges encountered in the evaluation process and provides examples of successful approaches to overcoming evaluation challenges. Examples are provided from the Michigan Maternal Infant Health Program evaluation strategy and considerations for effectiveness evaluation of MCH home visiting programs in the current landscape of expansion in the Nurse-Family Partnership Program in Pennsylvania.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Case studies, Child health, Evaluation methods, Family support services, Home visiting, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation

Sontag-Padilla L, Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Lovejoy SL, Firth R. 2013. Maternal depression: Implications for systems serving mother and child. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights evidence on the impact of maternal depression on the mother and child as it relates to the public-sector systems that serve them and discusses potential short- and long-term cost implications. This brief describes a supplemental component of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children initiative implemented in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which successfully implements depression screening in early intervention, develops cross-system referral processes, engages caregivers in services, and increases local capacity for providing relationship-based services by addressing many of the barriers identified in earlier stages of the collaborative’s work.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early interventions services, Local initiatives, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression

Zero to Three. 2013. State policy action team meeting: Moving an infant-toddler policy agenda. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the proceedings from a May 2013 meeting of teams from five states to discuss strategies for developing and moving forward on an infant-toddler policy agenda. Participants explored innovative state models and strategies for developing and moving an infant policy agenda; assist other states in their efforts to establish an infant-toddler policy agenda; and promote relationships and continued collaborative work among participants. Topics explored during the meeting included policy development, outreach to families, professional development systems integration, coordinated screening and referral systems, effective communication, data systems, and quality improvement,

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family support services, Illinois, Infant health, Infants, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Model programs, New Jersey, Outreach, Pennsylvania, Policy development, Quality assurance, Screening, Service integration, State initiatives, Young children

Courtot B, Coughlin TA, Lawton E. 2013. Medicaid and CHIP managed care payment methods and spending in 20 states: Final report to the Office of Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is a companion to the Medicaid and CHIP Risk-Based Managed Care in 20 States report, focuses on 20 states' Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care payment methods and spending. The states are Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The report addresses two research questions: (1) how do the 20 states establish capitation rates in their Medicaid and CHIP managed care programs, and how have their approaches to and policies for rate setting changed over the past decade and (2) how does monthly Medicaid spending for four distinct managed care enrollee populations (adults and children, with and without disabilities) vary among the 20 states? The report introduces the issues and presents the study approach, methods, findings, and a discussion.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Arizona, California, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Connecticut, Costs, Delaware, Disabilities, Florida, Managed care, Maryland, Massachusetts, Medicaid, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, State programs, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin

Seigle JE, ed. [2012]. The cost benefit of bullying prevention: A first-time analysis of savings. Pittsburgh, PA: Highmark Foundation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the costs and benefits of bullying-prevention efforts. The paper, which is an outgrowth of the Highmark's Foundation's bullying initiative, looks at the financial impact that could be anticipated based on the foundation-funded implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, which has been implemented in Pennsylvania schools, over a 3-year period in the 49 Pennsylvania counties it serves. Topics include economics of the program, cost benefit in three impact areas (health conditions related to bullying, treatment rate and costs, and estimated savings if these costs are avoided), cost benefit of the program for schools, societal costs benefits of bullying prevention, and economic implications.

Contact: Highmark Foundation, Fifth Avenue Place, 120 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3099, Telephone: (800) 789-1726 Fax: (412) 544-6120 E-mail: info@highmarkfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.highmark.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Bullying, Child health, Costs, Financing, Mental health, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Programs, Schools, Treatment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.