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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (100 total).

Texas Department of State Health Services. (2018). Healthy Texas Smiles teaser. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1 video (1.27 min.).

Annotation: This video provides information about the Healthy Texas Smiles for Moms and Babies project. The project trains home visitors on how to help pregnant women understand the importance of taking care of their oral health. The project also trains home visitors on how to teach mothers to take care of their infant’s mouth after birth. The video shows home visitors in various settings interacting with pregnant women and their families and providing them with oral health education in their homes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7111 Secondary Telephone: (512) 458-7708 Fax: (512) 458-7750 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us

Keywords: Home visits, Infant health, MCH training, Oral health, Pregnant women, State programs, Texas, Videotapes

Texas Health Institute. 2018. Oral health in Texas: Bridging gaps and filling needs. Austin, TX: Texas Health Institute, 190 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on the burden of oral disease in Texas. The report includes a state-level overview of oral health organized around four topics: (1) where Texas stands on oral health and overall health, (2) factors contributing to the state’s oral health burden, (3) Texans’ access to oral health care, and (4) the capacity of the Texas oral health work force to meet demand. Each section describes available scientific evidence and provides a review of associated policy issues. The profiles display data on population and socioeconomic factors, oral health outcomes, risk factors for disease, clinical care, and Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program enrollment and expenditures.

Contact: Texas Health Institute, 8501 N. Mopac Expressway, Suite 170, Austin, TX 78759, Web Site: http://www.texashealthinstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Oral health, Public policy, Socioeconomic factors, State initiatives, Statistical data, Access to health care, Texas

Texas Statewide Health Coordinating Council. 2018. 2019-2020 update to the Texas state health plan. Austin, TX: Texas Statewide Health Coordinating Council, 58 pp.

Annotation: This update to the Texas state health plan, which provides guidance on how to achieve a high-quality, efficient health system that serves the needs of all Texans, focuses on health literacy, availability of clinical training sites, oral health, and trauma care. Each section of the update discusses improving access to health care, ensuring quality in the health care system, and strengthening the system by ensuring a robust health care work force.

Contact: Texas Statewide Health Coordinating Council, Texas Department of State Health Services, P.O Box 149347, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health literacy, Oral health, Quality assurance, State programs, Texas

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2016. Oral evaluation and fluoride varnish in the medical home. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource describes Oral Evaluation and Fluoride Varnish, a program aimed at improving the oral health of infants and young children ages 6–35 months in Texas. Topics include certification and reimbursement for physicians, physician assistants, and advanced practice registered nurses for performing limited services in conjunction with a Texas Health Steps medical checkup. Program services include oral evaluation, fluoride-varnish application, anticipatory guidance, and referral to a dental home. Links to training programs, forms, materials, product resources, online provider lookup, and the Medicaid provider website are also available.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental caries, Disease prevention, Infants, Medicaid, Oral health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reimbursement, State programs, Texas, Training, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2016. AMCHP case study: Engaging diverse populations–State examples. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document describes family engagement as a critical part of Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs and ways that states are engaging diverse populations. Contents include case study examples in Kentucky and Texas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community participation, Cultural diversity, Families, Kentucky, Leadership, Public private partnerships, Role, State programs, Texas, Title V programs

Texas Statewide Health Coordinating Council. 2016. 2017-2022 Texas state health plan: A proposal for ensuring high-quality health care for all Texans. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, 100 pp.

Annotation: This plan identifies challenges in ensuring that Texans have access to health services, including oral health services; that services are provided in an efficient and orderly manner; and that an ample health care work force exists to provide these services. Additionally, the plan addresses the need for robust primary care and mental health systems in the state. The plan offers strategies to improve the efficiency of the state’s health-care-delivery system, address shortcomings in its payment system, produce more health professionals in areas of need, and heighten satisfaction with the system.

Contact: Texas Statewide Health Coordinating Council, Texas Department of State Health Services, P.O Box 149347, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care delivery, Oral health, Primary care, Service delivery systems, State programs, Texas

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas third grade oral health basic screening survey results. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 1 p.

Annotation: This document presents findings from a public-school-based screening survey to collect oral health data consistent with national standards. Topics include percentages of students in third grade with untreated tooth decay, dental sealants, and urgent need for oral health care. Comparisons from two statewide samples against Healthy People 2020 goals are included.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Disease prevention, Elementary schools, Health objectives, Needs assessment, Oral health, Population surveillance, Preventive health services, School age children, Screening, State surveys, Texas

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas oral health and the National Survey of Children's Health. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 1 p.

Annotation: This document presents select results from the National Survey of Children's Health on the percentages of infants, children, and adolescent (from birth to age 17) in Texas who received preventive oral health care in the past year. The data are stratified by poverty status and type of insurance for the state and for the United States as a whole.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Comparative analysis, Dental care, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Infants, Low income groups, National surveys, Oral health, Preventive health services, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas oral health and Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document presents findings on the relationship between preventive oral health care use and health behaviors among students in grades 9-12 in Texas. Contents include the percentage of students lacking dental visits within the past year by age; race/ethnicity; risk-taking behavior (drinking soda, tobacco use, marijuana use); and healthy behavior (physical activity and good school grades).

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescents, Age factors, Children, Comparative analysis, Dental care, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, National surveys, Nutrition, Oral health, Preventive health services, Risk taking, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas, Tobacco, Young adults

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2014. Foster children: Additional federal guidance could help states better plan for oversight of psychotropic medications administered by managed care plans. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report updates the December 2011 report published by the U.S. Government Accountability Office on foster children in selected states that were prescribed psychotropic medications at rates higher than nonfoster children in Medicaid in 2008. The current report examines instances of foster children being prescribed psychotropic medications in the following five states: Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon, and Texas. The report assesses the extent that documentation supported the use of psychotropic medications, describes states' policies related to psychotropic medication, and assesses the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' actions since GAO's 2011 report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-14-362.

Keywords: Drugs, Federal initiatives, Florida, Foster children, Massachusetts, Medicaid managed care, Mental health services, Michigan, Oregon, Policy analysis, State programs, Texas, Utilization review

McManus MA, Fox HB. 2014. Lack of comparability between CHIP and ACA qualified health plans. Washington, DC: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 34 pp. (Fact sheet; no. 11)

Annotation: This fact sheet compares benefits and cost-sharing requirements in separate non-Medicaid Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIPs) and child-only qualified health plans available to families with low and moderate incomes in five geographically representative states -- Colorado, Georgia, Oregon, Texas, and West Virginia -- that enroll all or almost all of CHIP-eligible children in separate programs. Contents include a brief summary of each state's current CHIP eligibility levels for its separate CHIP programs, type of CHIP benefit package, and type of health insurance exchanges. Additional topics include coverage for 28 mandatory and optional service categories defined under the CHIP statute.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Colorado, Comparative analysis, Cost sharing, Eligibility, Georgia, Health care reform, Individualized health plans, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oregon, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State programs, Texas, West Virginia

JSI Research and Training Institute. 2014. Engaging community stakeholders to address the social determinants of teen pregnancy. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 5 pp.

Annotation: This case study highlights how state- and community-based organizations in Alabama, New York, and Texas used the root cause analysis (RCA) process to identify the social conditions (risk and protective factors) influencing adolescent pregnancy in their communities and create action plans to address these factors. Topics include using RCA to engage youth and diverse stakeholders, using RCA to develop a strategic plan, lessons learned from the RCA process, and recommendations.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alabama, Case studies, Community action, Community based agencies, New York, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, State agencies, Strategic plans, Texas

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, Brain Injury Association of Virgina. 2013. Virginia collaborative policy summit on brain injury and juvenile justice: Proceedings report. Henrico, VA: Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, 31 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings document a national policy summit held on June 13-14, 2012, in Richmond, Virginia, to convene leaders involved in identifying and supporting youth with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the juvenile justice system. The purpose of the summit was to share information, resources, and effective screening and intervention strategies to improve TBI services within states and move toward achieving a consistent national approach to screening and intervention. Contents include a participant list; background information about brain injury; the summit agenda; state project overviews including current status and identification and screening procedures; information from small group discussions on evaluation and screening, education and outreach, and treatment and intervention; and information from peer group discussions on policy implications. Recommendations for policy and future study are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, 8004 Franklin Farms Drive, Henrico, VA 23229-5019, Telephone: (800) 552-5019 Secondary Telephone: (800) 552-9950 E-mail: dars@dars.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vadrs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Head injuries, Minnesota, National initiatives, Nebraska, Program improvement, Public development, Screening, Service coordination, State programs, Texas, Utah, Virginia

Texas Breastfeeding Collaborative. 2013. Improving breastfeeding support through milk banks. Boston, MA: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality , 1 video (4 min., 4 sec.).

Annotation: This video provides a tour of the Mother's Milk Bank of North Texas. The video explores how the milk bank works, explains why breastfeeding is important for mothers and infants, and discusses why donation milk is important for helping families to support breastfeeding. The video describes the screening and approval process for donors and explains how milk is tested, stored, mixed, bottled, pasteurized, and released to hospitals for use—primarily in neonatal intensive care units.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Community programs, Hospitals, Infant health, Mothers, Multimedia, Neonatal intensive care units, State programs, Texas, Videos, Women's health

Shapiro R. 2013. Balancing fidelity and flexibility: Implementing the Gen.M Program in Texas—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an evaluation of the Gender Matters (Gen.M) sex education program implemented in Travis County, Texas to help reduce the rate of teen pregnancy. The report describes the program’s design, facilitators’ training and delivery of the program, and youth engagement and understanding of the material after the first year of implementation. It concludes with lessons learned that could improve future Gen M. program outcomes.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Sexuality education, State programs, Texas

Courtot B, Coughlin TA, Lawton E. 2013. Medicaid and CHIP managed care payment methods and spending in 20 states: Final report to the Office of Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is a companion to the Medicaid and CHIP Risk-Based Managed Care in 20 States report, focuses on 20 states' Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care payment methods and spending. The states are Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The report addresses two research questions: (1) how do the 20 states establish capitation rates in their Medicaid and CHIP managed care programs, and how have their approaches to and policies for rate setting changed over the past decade and (2) how does monthly Medicaid spending for four distinct managed care enrollee populations (adults and children, with and without disabilities) vary among the 20 states? The report introduces the issues and presents the study approach, methods, findings, and a discussion.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Arizona, California, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Connecticut, Costs, Delaware, Disabilities, Florida, Managed care, Maryland, Massachusetts, Medicaid, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, State programs, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin

Martin AB, Torres M, Vyavaharkar M, Chen Z, Towne S, Probst JC. 2013. Rural border health chartbook. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the health status of and health care use among people residing on the U.S. side of the entire U.S.-Mexico border. Topics include geographic and ethnic disparities among U.S. border residents and select indicators related to access to care, women's preventive services, oral health, infectious and communicable diseases, and mental health warranting programmatic and policy interventions. Contents include issues among residents in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas, including comparison of indicators by ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic), rurality (rural vs. urban), and proximity to border (border vs. non-border). Data cover the period 2005–2009.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, California, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, Health disparities, Health status, New Mexico, Rural populations, State surveys, Texas

Currie J, Rossin-Slater M. 2012. Weathering the storm: Hurricanes and birth outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 31 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18070)

Annotation: This paper examines the effects of exposure to severe storms and hurricanes during pregnancy on birth outcomes in Texas between 1996 and 2008. The paper presents the issue and discusses background literature, data and summary statistics, empirical methods, and results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Disasters, Infant health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Reproductive health, Research, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas

Shulman J, Cappelli DP, Coon P, Payne HW, Reinecke S. 2012. Texas Oral Health Coalition's oral health plan for the state of Texas 2012-2015. Midland, TX: Texas Oral Health Coalition, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document details the steps taken by the Texas Oral Health Coalition to produce a state oral health plan, reviews the state's oral health efforts, and recommends programs and priorities to improve the oral health of people living in Texas. The plan is organized around the core functions of public health including monitoring and surveillance, research, communications, preventive strategies, state infrastructure, evaluation, partnerships, and policy development. Each core function has four sections: background, existing activity at the state level, gaps, and action items.

Contact: Texas Oral Health Coalition, TX Telephone: (432) 413-8843 Fax: (432) 689-7507 Web Site: http://txohc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coalitions, Oral heath, Statewide planning, Texas

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Texas and Louisiana: Healthy Start for more infants. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report presents case studies from Texas and Louisiana that illustrate innovative approaches that states are employing to help ensure that more children get a healthy start in life. The report provides background information on the complications often resulting from premature birth and discusses the essential features of Texas's Healthy Babies Initiative and Louisiana's Birth Outcomes Initiative. Resources for more information about the programs are provided.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Initiatives, Louisiana, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Prevention, State programs, Texas

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.