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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (6,014 total).

Stein REK, Jessop DJ, Ireys HT, eds. rev. 1984. Conference report: Education of pediatricians for the ongoing care of children with special health care needs, July 26-28, 1983. New York, NY: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the organization, structure and objectives of the conference on educating pediatricians in the care of children with special health needs. The conference was organized into small group sessions dealing with the following topics: roles of the pediatrician in the care of children with special needs, skills needed for executing identified roles, how current medical education fosters and obstructs the development of needed skills, enhancing the preparation of pediatricians for the care of children with special health needs, and a discussion about what changes need to be made to educational programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Montefiore Medical Center , Rosenthal 4, Room Red Zone SE Pavillion , 111 East 210th Street , Bronx, NY 10467, Telephone: (718) 741-2460 Fax: (718) 654-6692 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/departments/pediatrics/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Conferences, Educational programs, Medical education, Pediatricians, Professional training, Reports

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

Magrab P, Elder J, Kazuk E, Pelosi J, Wiegerink R. n.d.. Developing a community team: A companion to the community workbook for collaborative services to preschool handicapped children. Washington, DC: American Association of University Affiliated Programs for the Developmentally Disabled, 39 pp. (Workbook series for providing services to children with handicaps and their families)

Annotation: This book explains the steps needed to plan and implement collaboration between community programs, agencies and individuals who provides services to children with disabilities and their families. This book was reprinted by the Georgetown University Child Development Center as a part of the Workbook Series for Providing Services to Children with Handicaps and Their Families.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Interagency cooperation

Oregon Department of Human Resources, State Health Division, Emergency Medical Services Section, Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Project. n.d.. How to handle a child's medical emergency: Caring means preparing. Portland, OR: Oregon Department of Human Resources, 1 booklet (37 pp.), 1 brochure, 1 brochure original.

National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. n.d.. Meeting the medical bills. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 1 p., 1 videotape (VHS).

Annotation: This brochure describes a videotape by the same title that gives excerpts of a talk by Julie Beckett of Iowa on strategies for financing the health care needed by families of chronically ill children, and includes a glossary of terms used in the videotape. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (202) 638-0840 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Brochure available at no charge; videotape $10.95 from National Information Center for Handicapped Children and Youth, P.O. Box 1492, Washington, DC 20013.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Health care financing

MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program. n.d.. Working with your health insurance. Cleveland, OH: MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides information and forms to help families work with their health insurance companies. It includes questions to ask the insurance company and billing office, tips for keeping records of bills and claims, and who to talk with for assistance. A glossary of terms and list of publications on health insurance are included. Resource organizations in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio are also listed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered, community based care, Health care financing, Insurance, Medical records

National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center. n.d.. A national goal: Building service delivery systems for children with special health care needs and their families—Family centered community based coordinated care. Iowa City, IA: National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the elements of a family-centered, community-based system for delivering health care for children with special health needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF061.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered community based care

Prendergast A. n.d.. Planning comprehensive health services for the chronically ill/handicapped child: Need for nutrition component. Cincinnati, OH: Educational Television Services, 1 videotape.

Gerald T. Rogers Productions. n.d.. Can you tell me—which foods are good?. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media, 1 videotape (10 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape uses puppet characters and human actors to educate children, ages 4 to 8, about selecting good foods and choosing well-balanced meals. The videotape discusses the four food groups and the videotape discussion guide provides an introduction to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guide pyramid. The discussion guide provides a brief description of the content, educational objectives, and suggested topics for discussion and activities. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Educational materials, Food pyramid, Materials for children, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Churchill Films. n.d.. Sooper goop. (Short version). Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Films, 1 videotape (10 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape teaches children, ages 6 to 13, about nutrition and the use of advertising techniques to promote sales. The story traces the development of Sooper Goop, a breakfast cereal low in nutritional values and high in sugar, and the use of clever advertising strategies to persuade children to ask for the product. The discussion guide provides a brief description, educational objectives, suggested topics for discussion, and activities to reinforce the videotape message.

Contact: Churchill Media, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 773-775-9433 Fax: 800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Advertising, Audiovisual materials, Child nutrition, Educational materials, Materials for adolescents, Materials for children, Videotapes

Churchill Media. n.d.. Red Riding Hood and the well-fed wolf. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media, 1 videotape (16 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape uses the story of Little Red Riding Hood as the basis for teaching children, ages 8 to 12, about nutrition and good meals. Red Riding Hood reviews the wolf's eating habits and suggests healthier alternatives. The revised edition introduces the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guide pyramid. The discussion guide provides a brief summary, educational objectives, a small copy of the food guide pyramid, and suggested topics for discussion and follow-up activities.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-7932-3025.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Audiovisual materials, Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Educational materials, Food pyramid, Materials for adolescents, Materials for children, Videotapes

University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine; Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; and District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children. n.d.. North Carolina emergency medical services for children: Pediatrics protocols for prehospital and emergency department management. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Charlotte, NC: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; Washington, DC: District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children, 35 pp.

Annotation: These protocols for emergency medical technicians and hospital personnel in North Carolina provide guidelines for triage, transport, and treatment of children who have suffered traumatic injuries or have life threatening conditions. The protocols are grouped in two sections; the first contains prehospital paramedic protocols; and the second contains hospital treatment protocols. The first section also includes guidelines for transport. The individual protocols are presented as flow-charts with the critical procedures indicated for each step in caring for the child. Conditions include: multiple trauma, head trauma, newborn resuscitation, poisoning, and seizures, among others. [Partially funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1000 Blythe Boulevard , Charlotte, NC 28203, Telephone: (704) 355-3658 Fax: (704) 355-7047 E-mail: EMresidency@CarolinasHealthCare.Org Price unknown.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Hospital emergency services, Hospital personnel, Injuries, North Carolina, Protocols, Resources for professionals, Therapeutics

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Larsen B. n.d.. Activity Analysis II: Solution of the linear programming problem. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, Systems Development Project , 34 pp. (Comment series no: 0-1 (27))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to present a solution algorithm for the general linear programming problem of providing decision-makers in human organizations a with tools that will enable him to make decisions in an orderly fashion and with as much precision as possible. Particular emphasis is placed on basic concepts and fundamental principles, i.e., motivation and simplicity of explanation rather than on rigorous proofs and technical details. The aim of the paper is to make more effective communication and cooperation between the non-managerial mathematician and the non-mathematical manager. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Administration, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Decision making, Management information systems, Program evaluation

Hallstrom BJ. n.d.. Utilization of nursing personnel: A task specific approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 14 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (30))

Annotation: This paper seeks to establish a theoretical rationale for task delegation of nursing personnel based on the concept of independent and delegated functioning. Preliminary findings from a study of how a sample of projects are utilizing nursing and other personnel in performance of selected tasks is also presented, along with their view as to ideal utilization of personnel for performing these tasks, and the consensus of their judgment as to the type, whether independent or delegated, each task is deemed to be. Such task analysis is discussed as the first step in developing the criteria for interchangeability of personnel and delegation of tasks, and for optimal utilization of personnel within comprehensive health care programs. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Nurses, Personnel management, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Tunick FL, Butterweck JE, Landman PD. n.d.. Parental evaluation of health care delivery in a children and youth project. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 9 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (31))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to describe a method used to assess community acceptance of a program to deliver comprehensive health care to children of low income families in New York City and to report the results. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs, Low income groups, New York, Program evaluation, Program evaluation, Questionnaires

Haugen IH. n.d.. A comparison between the social work profession and the nursing profession: Philosophy, theory and practice. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 25 pp. (Comment series no: 0-10 (34))

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.