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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (83 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 9: Percent of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are bullied or who bully others. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 9, percent of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are bullied or who bully others. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) assessment; (2) communication efforts; (3) implementation of evidence-based practices; (4) technical assistance and training; (5) policy and systems approaches; and (6) other program strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Model programs, Resources for professionals, State programs, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 9–Bullying [NPM 9 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies for state Title V programs to consider to reduce the number of adolescents, ages 12–17, who are bullied. Contents include information about the evidence continuum and the approach to the review, including examples of each type of intervention and its evidence rating; key findings; and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Bullying, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Lai Y-H, Garcia S, Strobino D, Grason H, Payne E, Karp C, Minkovitz C. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 9 bullying evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 72 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to reduce the number of adolescents, ages 12–17, who are bullied. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Bullying, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2017. Assessing prevention capacity & implementing change: An evidence-informed and evidenced-based bullying prevention capacity assessment and change package. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 45 pp.

Annotation: This document presents two tools: the Bullying Prevention Capacity Assessment and the Change Package. The assessment was created to help state health departments (SHDs) and others working to prevent bullying to assess where their efforts are in relation to best practices in bullying prevention and to help guide the implementation of effective bullying prevention activities and programs. The change package examines evidence-informed and evidence-based drivers that build organizational strength to effect change and strategies that support prevention efforts. An appendix presents a review of the evidence on bullying prevention.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Evidence-based practice, Model programs, Organizational change, Prevention programs

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Anti-bullying policies and enumeration: An infobrief for local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief for local education agency staff describes enumeration in the context of anti-bullying policies, referring to any specific listing of traits or characteristics of students that could be the basis of bullying. Topics include support for and concerns about enumeration, research on the effectiveness of enumerating anti-bullying policy, and key considerations and actions for effective implementation of all anti-bullying policies.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Local government, Policy development, Public policy, Research, School districts, State legislation, Students

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. 2016. 2013-2014 civil rights data collection: A first look–Key data on equity and opportunity gaps in our nation's public schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes results from a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States to measure student access to courses, programs, instructional and other staff, and resources that impact education equity and opportunity for students. Topics include school climate factors such as student discipline and bullying and harassment. Additional topics include restraint and seclusion, early learning, college and career readiness, chronic student absenteeism, education in justice facilities, and teacher staffing and equity.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-1100, Telephone: (800) 421-3481 Fax: (202) 453-6012 E-mail: OCR@ed.gov Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data analysis, Discipline, Equal opportunities, Learning, Measures, Public education, Public schools, School districts, Students

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2016. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #9: Bullying. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 12 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #9: Bullying--percent of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are bullied or bully others. It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Bullying, Evidence-based practice, Literature reviews, Measures, Model programs, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. [2015]. Bullying and absenteeism: Information for state and local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief for state and local education agencies presents findings from the peer-reviewed literature on associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among students in high school. The brief also describes what education agencies can do to prevent bullying. Topics include sharing information about potential education-related consequences of bullying, addressing electronic bullying beyond school boundaries, responding to co-occurring types of bullying, and opportunities for collaboration with health professionals.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Collaboration, High school students, Injury prevention, Research, School attendance, State agencies, Violence prevention

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2015. School health profiles: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 191 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

Robers S, Zhang A, Morgan RE, Musu-Gillette L. 2015. Indicators of school crime and safety: 2014. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics, annual.

Annotation: This annual report presents data on school crime and student safety. The indicators in the report are based on information drawn from a variety of data sources including national surveys of students, teachers, principals, and postsecondary institutions. The report covers topics such as victimization, teacher injury, bullying and cyberbullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions. Indicators of crime and safety are compared across different population subgroups and over time. Data on crimes that occur away from school are offered as a point of comparison where available.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, College students, Colleges, Crime, Data, Drug use, Environmental influences, Injuries, School age children, School safety, Schools, Trends, Violence, Weapons

Children's Safety Network. 2015. Bullying prevention: 2015 resource guide. Waltham, MA: Children's Safety Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and resources about bullying prevention. Contents include descriptions of organizations and websites; data, definitions, and research; programs, campaigns, and toolkits; policies, laws, and legislation; publications and resources; and information about at-risk populations and bullying and co-occurring issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Injury prevention, Resources for professionals, Safety

Children's Safety Network. 2015. Summary of findings: 2014 CSN bullying prevention environmental scan. Waltham, MA: Children's Safety Network, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document presents results from a survey of state maternal and child health (MCH) and injury and violence prevention program directors in all 50 states and the District of Columbia about state health agency involvement in bullying prevention efforts. Topics include leadership of state bullying prevention efforts, strategies used by state public health agencies to prevent bullying, types of bullying addressed by state public health agencies, systems and populations addressed by state public health agency bullying prevention efforts, funding for bullying prevention, strategic plans for bullying prevention, measuring progress in bullying prevention, and multi-agency bullying prevention task forces and committees. Strengths, challenges, opportunities, and conclusions are also addressed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Bullying, Financing, Injury prevention, Leadership, Measures, Multidisciplinary teams, Prevention programs, State health agencies, State surveys, Strategic plans, Violence prevention

Stopbullying.gov. 2014. Bullying prevention and response base training module. [Washington, DC]: Stopbullying.gov, 109 pp.

Annotation: This bullying prevention training module provides information and resources to help viewers lead bullying prevention efforts in their local communities. The training describes the many forms of bullying; presents best practices and misdirections in bullying prevention and response, and provides case studies to help community facilitators lead effective prevention programs. Group brainstorming and next action steps are also covered in the training module, which can be viewed in English or Spanish as slides or in printable pdf format.

Contact: Stopbullying.gov, 200 Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://www.stopbullying.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Bullying, Community participation, Prevention, Training materials

Gladden RM, Vivolo-Kantor AM, Hamburger ME, Lumpkin CD. 2014. Bullying surveillance among youths: Uniform definitions for public health and recommended data elements–Version 1.0. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 104 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help organizations, researchers, evaluators, community groups, educators, and public health officials define and gather systematic data on bullying to better inform research and prevention efforts. Contents include background on the problem including what is currently known about the public health burden of bullying and the need for a uniform definition of bullying, the uniform definition and description of key terms, considerations to keep in mind when gathering data on bullying, and recommended data elements.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data collection, Injury prevention, Injury surveillance systems, Research

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2014. The relationship between bullying and suicide: What we know and what it means to schools. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information to improve schools' understanding of and ability to prevent and respond to bullying- and suicide-related behaviors. Contents include research on bullying and suicide, and what school personnel can do and where they can find more information.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Bullying, Child mental health, Data linkage, Prevention, Suicide, Youth

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Bullying: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. KnowBullying: Put the power to prevent bullying in your hand. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Annotation: This mobile application is designed to help parents start a conversation with their children about bullying. The application describes strategies to prevent bullying and explains how to recognize warning signs that a child is bullying or being bullied. A section for educators is also included. The application is available in English, German, Northern Sami, and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Mobile applications, Non English language materials, Parent child relations, Parents, Spanish language materials, Violence prevention

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.