Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (190 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Werner EE. n.d.. Final report: The Kauai Study—Follow-up at adolescence. [Los Angeles, CA: University of California at Los Angeles?], 398 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to present the findings of the fourth phase of a longitudinal study of a multi-racial cohort of youth, born on the island of Kauai, Hawaii in 1955. The results of the first three phases of the study (prenatal period to age 10) were published in the book The Children of Kauai (1971). The purposes of this report are to follow up where the previous study left off at age 10, to document the course of the learning and behavior disorders diagnosed in childhood, to take a look at new problems and new promises in adolescence, to examine a concerned community's response to its at risk youth, to consider factors that contributed to improvement, and to evaluate the predictive power of the diagnostic tools of the previous phases of the study. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Hawaii, Learning disabilities, Reports

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. A sampling of outcome findings from interventions relevant to addressing barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, ca. 150 pp. (Technical assistance sampler)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide technical assistance to individuals working to improve student performance in American public schools. Examples of specific techniques that address barriers to student learning and data to support these techniques are highlighted within this document. Areas covered include (1) enhancing classroom-based efforts to enable learning, (2) providing student and family assistance, (3) responding to and preventing crises, (4) supporting transitions, (5) increasing home involvement in schooling, and (6) outreach for greater community involvement and support. [Support in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Community participation, Knowledge level, Learning, Mental health, Parent participation

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. Technical assistance sampler on: Using technology to address barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the use of technology to overcome barriers to learning. Topics include information systems management, multimedia aids to facilitate intervention, in situ and distance learning, and model programs and guides. A list of additional references is also included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Education, Information systems, Intervention, Learning, Mental health, Model programs, Technology

Calkins R. n.d.. Planning and Establishment of a Parent-Child Development Center=Family Based Education Centers: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate Center for Development of Early Education, 50 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model integrated service system of educational, health, and social service programs for families of Hawaiian children (prenatal to age 5 years) who are disproportionately at risk for health, social, and educational handicaps. Four Native Hawaiian Family Based Education Centers were established, with three core educational components: A home visiting program, a traveling preschool program, and a center-based preschool. Activities included conducting an extensive assessment of community needs and developing ongoing ties with institutions of higher learning in the State. Strong health promotion and social service programs complemented the educational focus, and a case management system helped families assess their own goals in each of these areas. Community participation and ownership of the program were critical components. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147023.

Keywords: Community-Based Education Programs, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Education, Family-Based, Hawaiians, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Learning Disabilities, Low Birthweight, Parents, Prenatal Care

National Eye Institute. n.d.. Wild about healthy vision: Activity book for ages 9-12. [Bethesda, MD]: National Eye Institute, 15 pp.

Annotation: This activity booklet is designed to help children between the ages of nine and twelve learn about healthy vision. It includes a variety of games and activities to help children learn about eye disease, eye safety, and first aid for eye injuries.

Contact: National Eye Institute, , 31 Center Drive, MSC 2510, Bethesda, MD 20892-2510, Telephone: (301) 496-5248 Fax: (301) 402-1065 E-mail: 2020@nei.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nei.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational materials, Eye care, Learning activities, Materials for children, Vision

National Eye Institute. n.d.. See all you can see: Activity book for ages 6-8. [Bethesda, MD]: National Eye Institute, 12 pp.

Annotation: This activity booklet is designed to help children between the ages of six and eight learn about healthy vision. It includes a variety of games and activities to help children learn about eye disease, eye safety, and first aid for eye injuries.

Contact: National Eye Institute, , 31 Center Drive, MSC 2510, Bethesda, MD 20892-2510, Telephone: (301) 496-5248 Fax: (301) 402-1065 E-mail: 2020@nei.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nei.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational materials, Eye care, Learning activities, Materials for children, Vision

Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools. n.d.. Community schools: Promoting student success–A rationale and results framework. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document for local policymakers and practitioners provides guidance on implementing a community school strategy. It outlines a rationale for the community school as a primary vehicle for increasing student success and strengthening families and community. The document also defines specific results that community schools seek -- both in terms of how they function and in relationship to the well being of students, families, and communities. Contents include the community schools vision, guiding principles, logic model, and framework for student success. Conditions for learning and indicators of capacity are also addressed.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Development, Education, Families, Leadership, Learning, Models, Program improvement, Schools, Students, Teaching

Talib Z, Palsdottir B, Briggs M, Clithero A, Cobb NM, Marjadi B, Preston R, Williams S. 2017. Defining community-engaged health professional education: A step toward building the evidence. Washington, DC: National Academy of Medicine, 4 pp. (Discussion paper)

Annotation: This paper describes the lack of published literature analyzing learning taking place in and with communities that has a demonstrated value to that community and the factors attributable to it, and efforts to build the evidence by establishing a common definition for community-engaged health professional education that is relevant to all health professionals in all disciplines in all settings or context. Contents include elements of the definition. Topics include sustainable community-academic partnerships; collaborative design, delivery, and evaluation; and next steps for building the evidence.

Contact: National Academy of Medicine, 500 5th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, E-mail: NAMedicine@nas.edu Web Site: http://nam.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Equal opportunities, Evaluation, Goals, Health occupations, International health, Leadership, Learning, Policy development, Professional education, Public private partnerships, Strategic plans, Sustainability, Training, Underserved communities, Work force

Mann R, Mays A. 2017. State ESSA plans to support student health and wellness: A framework for action (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on developing state plans for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in ways that support student health and wellness. Topics include engaging stakeholders in a way that ensures an effective ESSA state plan is developed and implemented; implementing a state accountability system and creating a school report card that supports the health and learning connection; integrating health and wellness into standards, assessments, and a well-rounded education; integrating student learning through staff wellness and professional development; supporting the transition from early childhood programs to elementary school; transferring funding to strengthen ESSA health and wellness programming; the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant; and looking ahead. For each topic, the document outlines why it's important, what the law says, action steps, and resources. An overview of ESSA is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Accountability, Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Federal initiatives, Financing, Grants, Learning, Needs Assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Service integration, Standards, Statewide planning, Students, Transitions

Gracy D, Fabian A, Roncaglione V, Savage K, Redlener I. 2017. Health barriers to learning: The prevalence and educational consequences in disadvantaged children–A review of the literature. New York, NY: Children's Health Fund, 93 pp.

Annotation: This report offers recommendations to strengthen the safety net for children. It describes health barriers to learning, including oral pain and untreated dental caries, and the evidence base for the impact of these barriers on academic success. For each barrier, the report describes the prevalence; the extent of unmet need for services to identify, manage, and treat the barrier; the impact of the barrier on learning; and key points.

Contact: Children's Health Fund, 215 West 125th Street, Suite 301 , New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 535-9400 Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Barriers, Child health, Disease management, Learning, Literature reviews, Needs assessment, Prevalence, School readiness, Service integration

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

Collective Impact Forum. 2017. How to lead collaborative impact working groups. Boston, MA: Collective Impact Forum, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help working group leaders contribute to a successful collective impact initiative. Contents include modules on how to build membership, plan for and run an effective meeting, build a culture of collaboration, put systems thinking into practice, engage community members, and be data-driven and learn along the way. Additional contents include sample working group strategies, meeting planning steps for co-chairs, meeting agenda templates, and a meeting follow-up email template.

Contact: Collective Impact Forum, 500 Boylston Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (866) 351-8484 E-mail: info@collectiveimpactforum.org Web Site: http://www.collectiveimpactforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Facilitated communication, Leadership, Learning, Meetings, Planning, Systems development

Takanishi R, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Fostering School Success for English Learners: Toward New Directions in Policy, Practice, and Research. 2017. Promoting the educational success of children and youth learning English: Promising Futures. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 430 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the assets that dual language learners (DLLs) and English learners (ELs) bring to their education and the factors that support or may impede their educational success. The report also provides recommendations for policy, practice, and research and data collection focused on addressing the challenges in caring for and educating DLLs/ELs from birth to grade 12. Topics include the policy context, demography of the EL population, capacities and influences on language development, promising and effective practices and programs, the development of English language proficiency, DLLs/Els with disabilities, and building the workforce to educate ELs.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-45537-4.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child care, Children, Data collection, Education, Home visiting, Infants, Language development, Learning, Policy development, Research, School readiness, Work force

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development. 2017. Resource guide: Building a bright future for all–Success in early learning programs and elementary school for immigrant families. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, 55 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist state and local efforts to support immigrant children from birth through the elementary grades and promote educational equity and opportunity for all children. Contents include a glossary and background; legal guidelines; tips for early learning programs, elementary schools, and educators; and information about education and supportive service programs and resources. The second section of the guide is a handbook for parents on topics such as why quality early learning matters, tips on immunizations, information about civil rights and program eligibility, tips for addressing barriers, and opportunities for parents and guardians.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Washington, DC Telephone: (202) 401-0831 Secondary Telephone: (202) 401-7888 E-mail: opepd.ppss@ed.gov Web Site: https://ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Civil rights, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Elementary schools, Eligibility, Equal opportunities, Guardianship, Immigrants, Learning, Legal issues, Parents, Spanish language materials

National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning. 2017. Framework for effective practice: Supporting school readiness for all children. Seattle, WA: National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes a framework to support school readiness for all children. The framework comprises elements that foster children's learning and development, including teacher-child interactions that are emotionally and instructionally supportive and a well-organized classroom that maximizes learning opportunities; evidence-based curriculum and teaching strategies linked with ongoing assessment of child progress; and highly individualized teaching and learning practices that are required for some skills or for some children to access, participate, and thrive in the preschool classroom.

Contact: National Center on Early Childhood Development, Teaching, and Learning, Telephone: (844) 261-3752 E-mail: ecdtl@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child development, Curriculum development, Emotional development, Learning, Quality assurance, School readiness, Spanish language materials, Teaching, Young children

Alperin M, Uden-Holman TM, Rodgers KC, eds. 2017. U.S. Public Health Learning Network: Innovative competency-based training for the public health workforce. Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 3(1, Suppl.):5S–87S,

Annotation: This supplement comprises 15 articles focused on the work of the U.S. Public Health Learning Network (PHLN). Contents include commentaries, a reflective piece, descriptive best practices, and original research that describe the work of the regional public health training centers (PHTCs), local performance sites, and National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training, which comprise the PHLN. Topics include recommendations for successful implementation of Public Health 3.0 principles, the role that practice-based experiences such as internships and field placements have on public health students, the role of the PHLN in strengthening the public health work force, and the major areas of activity of the PHTC program.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health personnel, Learning: Training, Public health, Role, Teaching, Work force

McLanahan S, Currie JM, Haskins R, Kearney M, Rouse CE, Sawhill I. 2017. Social and emotional learning. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2 items. (The future of children; vol. 27, no. 1, Spring 2017)

Annotation: This issue of Future of Children examines the state of the science on social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention and assessment, and related policy issues in education. The eight articles describe how to support SEL in schools and explore how SEL in schools might impact policy questions in education. Topics include SEL as a public health approach to education; SEL interventions in early childhood; promoting social and emotional competencies in elementary school; SEL programs for adolescents; SEL-focused after-school programs; SEL and equity in school discipline; SEL and teachers; and social-emotional assessment, performance, and standards.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, After school programs, Assessment, Child development, Competency based education, Discipline, Elementary schools, Emotional development, Intervention, Learning, Policy analysis, Psychosocial development, Standards, Teaching, Young children

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. 2017. Oral health 101. Reno, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 6 items.

Annotation: These learning modules provide an overview of dentistry and oral health for health department staff and others who do not have formal dental education or dental hygiene education and who would like to have a better understanding of oral health. Topics include oral health terminology, common oral diseases, conditions, and treatments; the interface of oral health and general health; and the oral health work force, oral health care settings, and financing.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult education, Dental care, Dental education, Distance learning, Oral health

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.