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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (845 total).

Federal Security Agency, Social Security Administration, Children's Bureau. n.d.. Infant and childhood mortality, maternal mortality, natality: 1947 chart book of trend data for the United States; profile data for each state. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 93 pp.

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Resource parents' home visiting guide. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 22 pp.

Annotation: This reference document is supplementary to the formal class training a resource mother receives in preparation for the job. It is intended as an organizer and a reminder of information to be covered for each monthly home visit. Each monthly section contains the following: a list of goals for the visit; materials needed; a sample dialogue; step-by-step guide; and follow-up steps. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (202) 562-3046 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Paraprofessional, Parent support services, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Reference materials, Resource mothers

Great Expectations. n.d.. Parenting manual. New Orleans, LA: Healthy Start/Great Expectations, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This training manual is a curriculum in parenting for Great Expectation clients. The first section of the document includes a description of the eight week course; a parenting training schedule; guidelines for group leader or coordinator; ground rules for the participants; a parent pledge; and recruiting suggestions. The remainder of the manual provides resource material and handouts on these topics: orientation; health education; safety; nurturing and self esteem; communication and play; child reporting (types of abuse, types of neglect, mandated reporters, and factors that sometimes lead to abuse or neglect); and discipline. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Contact Phone: (504 ) 565-7601 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child care, Child development, Communication, Curricula, Discipline, Education, Family planning, Health education, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Louisiana, Nutrition, Outreach, Parenting, Play, Prenatal care, Prevention, Safety, Self-esteem

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Male Outreach Worker (MOW) case management protocol. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document gives an overview of the Male Outreach Worker (MOW) program in Washington DC. This program addresses the needs of fathers of infants in the Healthy Start program so that they may contribute positively in the health and well-being of the mother and baby. The document describes process objectives of the program, population characteristics that demonstrate the need for the MOW program, MOW staff responsibilities, recruitment, intervention design, case management, support/curriculum group activities, and MOW and MOW supervisor professional development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, Office of Maternal and Child Health, St. Elizabeth's Campus, Cottage Seven, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20032, Telephone: (202) 645-4174 Fax: (202) 645-5084 Available at no charge.

Keywords: Case management, District of Columbia, Family support services, Fathers, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Outreach, Prevention programs, Protocols, Social services

Panhandle Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Partners for a Healthy Baby mentoring and supervision curriculum. Tallahassee, FL: Panhandle Healthy Start Initiative, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document is an outline of the content and methodology of the mentoring and supervision curriculum used to train leadership individuals in home visiting. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Florida Panhandle Healthy Start, 1339 East Lafayette Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Telephone: (850) 922-1300 Fax: (850) 922-1352 E-mail: mgraham@mailer.fsu.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Curricula, Florida, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Infants, Mentors, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Supervision, Training materials

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Pendley. n.d.. Native American Adolescent Injury Prevention Project: [Final report]. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Health and Environment Department (HED), 12 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce the rate of unintentional injuries and deaths among Native American adolescents in New Mexico and the Southwest. Specific goals were to: (1) Improve existing data bases on deaths and disabilities from unintentional injuries among Native American teens; (2) improve culturally relevant injury prevention materials and methodologies for these teens; (3) improve the knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices regarding unintentional injuries among this population; (4) increase the availability of injury prevention materials and methodologies in Native American junior and senior high schools; and (5) increase the quality and quantity of injury prevention services provided to these teens by health care and tribal agencies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-199206.

Keywords: Southwestern United States, Adolescents, American Indians, Data Bases, Indian Health Service (IHS), Information Clearinghouses, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Mortality

Brown M. n.d.. Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project: [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the project address the leading causes of childhood mortality in Oklahoma - motor vehicle crashes, submersions and burns. The overall methodology focused on utilization of intra- and interagency coalitions. Specific strategies included car seat loaners programs, drowning and burn prevention education activities, and smoke alarm programs. The project successfully carried out objectives related to prevention of motor vehicle injuries, drowning and burns. By empowering collaborating agencies and programs, the project has assured continuation of a focus on prevention of pediatric injuries in Oklahoma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161569.

Keywords: Burns, Car Seats, Child, Community-Based Education Programs, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Parents, Poisons, Safety

Calkins R. n.d.. Planning and Establishment of a Parent-Child Development Center=Family Based Education Centers: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate Center for Development of Early Education, 50 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model integrated service system of educational, health, and social service programs for families of Hawaiian children (prenatal to age 5 years) who are disproportionately at risk for health, social, and educational handicaps. Four Native Hawaiian Family Based Education Centers were established, with three core educational components: A home visiting program, a traveling preschool program, and a center-based preschool. Activities included conducting an extensive assessment of community needs and developing ongoing ties with institutions of higher learning in the State. Strong health promotion and social service programs complemented the educational focus, and a case management system helped families assess their own goals in each of these areas. Community participation and ownership of the program were critical components. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147023.

Keywords: Community-Based Education Programs, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Education, Family-Based, Hawaiians, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Learning Disabilities, Low Birthweight, Parents, Prenatal Care

Danielson C. n.d.. Healthy Foundations [Final report]. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: The project's goals were to: (1) Develop and implement structures and processes in defined community areas to plan and implement a family-centered, community-based health care delivery system for children; (2) develop data system capacity and function statewide to ensure family-centered, community-based primary care services for children; and (3) share experiences in family-centered, community-based system change in the area of primary health care for children with other State, regional, and national maternal and child health providers. At the State level, strategies were directed toward developing a system of children's primary health care delivery that was family centered and community based. At the local level, child health steering committees in established projects were to continue to plan and implement child health system changes in their service areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Child Mortality, Community Based Health Services, Databases, Family Centered Health Care, Information Systems, Primary Care, Standards of Care, State Programs

Dimperio D. n.d.. Interconceptional Support of Women at High Risk for Low Birthweight [Final report]. Gainesville, FL: North Central Florida Maternal and Infant Care Project, 36 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to reduce the incidence of low birthweight by improving the preconceptional health of women who were at high risk for delivering a low birthweight infant. High-risk women were identified at delivery and were followed for 2 years. Client services were then provided by community health workers, who made home visits and developed a risk reduction plan for each client. Intervention protocols were developed for each risk factor and involved referral to the appropriate resource, followup to ensure client compliance, and reinforcement of professional counseling or supplemental teaching. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196848.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Services, Florida, High risk groups, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Indigent Patients, Infant Mortality, Intervention, Low Birthweight, WIC Program

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Mailloux S. n.d.. Improved Prenatal Care Utilization and Birth Outcome Project [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 80 pp.

Annotation: This project surveyed 3000 postpartum Massachusetts women in order to identify barriers to, components of, and levels of participation in prenatal care, and to collect data on the social context of women's lives during pregnancy. Various interventions with high risk women at four demonstration sites were evaluated and compared. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-144236.

Keywords: High risk pregnancy, Hispanics, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Poland M. n.d.. Increasing Access to Prenatal Care Through Problem Identification and Program Evaluation [Final report]. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed high infant mortality rates in Detroit and Wayne County as the general area of concern. The problems of high infant mortality rates and access to prenatal care were addressed over 3 years through a program of technical assistance to the Detroit/Wayne County Infant Health Promotion Coalition. The coalition, comprised of 36 public and private agencies, was established to address the high infant mortality rate through identification of contributing factors and development of programs to reduce these factors. Process objectives included: (1) identifing barriers to prenatal care through a review of relevant literature; (2) focus group discussions with health professionals and clients; (3) development of surveys of prenatal patients and new mothers with review of their medical charts; and (4) provide technical assistance in evaluating ongoing and proposed outreach efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196863.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Greene C. n.d.. Reducing High Infant Mortality in Southeast Louisiana [Final report]. Slidell, LA: Slidell Memorial Hospital Charities, Inc., 29 pp. pp.

Annotation: The project goal was to decrease the infant mortality rate in the target area to the national average by the end of the 3-year project period. The impact objective was to decrease the incidence of low birthweight to 6.5 percent and continue that downward trend to meet the U.S. Surgeon General's goal of 5 percent by the year 2000, and to increase Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment screenings to 80 percent of eligible children. The process objectives were to develop a one-stop perinatal and pediatric health facility, to draw St. Tammany Parish women into early prenatal care through aggressive outreach, and to develop a program of education and community support for indigent families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121875.

Keywords: EPSDT, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Motor Vehicle Crashes, One Stop Shopping, Prenatal Care, Unintentional Injuries

Ronan L. n.d.. A Demonstration Model of Risk-Appropriate Prenatal Care System to Reduce the Incidence of Low Birthweight in Maine [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Medical Care Development, Inc. , 52 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce infant morbidity and mortality due to low birthweight, and to demonstrate a cost-effective prenatal care program which was integrated into the existing system and can be duplicated in other states. Project objectives included: reducing the incidence of low birthweight newborns in the project; reducing the incidence of women who engage in high-risk behaviors during their pregnancy; instituting a model prenatal education, counseling, referral, and followup program in physicians' offices and other sites; and enhancing the education and counseling skills of prenatal care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103258.

Keywords: Counseling, Education of Health Professionals, Education of Patients, High risk pregnancy, Infant Morbidity, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Referrals

Perinatal Periods of Risk Work Group. n.d.. Perinatal Periods of Risk approach: The U.S. urban experience—A new community approach to fetal and infant mortality. [Omaha, NE: CityMatCH], 33 pp.

Annotation: These annotated slides outline a presentation on prevention efforts to improve fetal and infant mortality using an approach, called Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR), developed by the World Health Organization for developing countries and applying concepts to urban efforts in the United States. It highlights five major steps: (1) engaging community partners, (2) mapping feto-infant mortality, (3) focusing on reducing the overall feto-infant mortality rate, (4) examining potential opportunity gaps, and (5) targeting further investigations and prevention efforts. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community coordination, Developing countries, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, International health, Needs assessment, Prevention, Risk assessment, Statistical analysis

Kuklish S. n.d.. Combating infant mortality: Perinatal periods of risk analysis–A comparison of 2000-2002 and 2003-2005 birth cohort results. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 21 pp.

Annotation: This electronic file presents PowerPoint-type slides that describe the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis process and findings from a study of a reference group of individuals in Arizona that include a chart of feto-infant death, how different data can lead to potential actions, and changes between the first (2000-2002) and second (2003-2005) cohorts. Data are analyzed according to ethnicity, age, and level of education. It concludes with a statement of which groups and which periods on the prenatal-infancy continuum need to be focused on.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Out of print.

Keywords: Arizona, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, State surveys

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2019. Promising practices for safe sleep to inform the Missouri Safe Sleep Strategic Plan. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document describes promising practices for improving infant safe sleep and reducing infant mortality caused by Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID) in these areas: (1) active endorsements of American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines; (2) infant caregiver knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy; (3) community champions; and (4) supportive policies for safe sleep practices.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Missouri, Model programs, Sleep position, State programs

Building U.S. Capacity to Review and Prevent Maternal Deaths. 2018. Report from nine maternal mortality review committees. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, 74 pp.

Annotation: This report provides data from maternal mortality review committees in nine states on pregnancy-related maternal deaths and reports recommendations from the committees on actions that might have changed the course of events leading to the deaths. It also discusses these emerging issues: maternal mental health conditions, severe maternal morbidity, and incorporating equity.

Contact: Building U.S. Capacity to Review and Prevent Maternal Deaths, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Maternal mortality, Pregnancy, State surveys

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.