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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (119 total).

Human Relations Media. n.d.. Teenage crises: The fateful choices. Pleasantville, NY: Human Relations Media, 1 videotape (28 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape addresses many of problems encountered by adolescents including addiction, violence, pregnancy, AIDS, depression, and suicide. It discusses the importance of finding positive role models, setting goals, and defining a sense of purpose. Stories from a former gang member, an adolescent mother, a former substance abuser turned Olympic champion, and a young convict reveal how their difficulties began and trace the events that enabled them to turn their lives around.

Contact: Human Relations Media, 41 Kensico Drive, Mount Kisco, NY 10549, Telephone: (914) 666-9151 Fax: (914) 666-9506 E-mail: Letters@hrmvideo.com Web Site: http://www.hrmvideo.com/home.cfm $189.00 plus 5 percent shipping and handling.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Depression, Substance abuse, Substance dependence, Suicide, Videotapes, Violence

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. 2015. Suicide Safe: The suicide prevention app for health care providers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, 1 v.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2014. Suicide prevention among LGBT youth: A workshop for professionals who serve youth. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, 4 files.

Annotation: This toolkit contains workshop materials to build the capacity of schools, youth-serving organizations, and suicide prevention programs, with the larger goal of reducing suicidal behavior among LGBT youth. The leader's guide contains information about the history of the workshop; goals and objectives; intended audience; co-leaders; an overview of the workshop kit; instructions on workshop preparation, implementation, and follow-up; and a sample agenda, attendance sheet, exercise, certificate of attendance, and leader feedback form. The toolkit also includes handouts and presenter slides and notes.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cultural competence, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Mental health services, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, Self injurious behavior, Suicide prevention, Training materials, Youth

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, American School Counselor Association, National Association of School Psychologists, The Trevor Project. 2014. Model school district policy on suicide prevention: Model language, commentary, and resources. West Hollywood, CA: Trevor Project, 3 items.

National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force. 2014. A prioritized research agenda for suicide prevention: An action plan to save lives. Washington, DC: National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, 172 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a prioritized approach for allocating funds and monitoring future suicide research to ensure that available resources target research with the greatest likelihood of reducing suicide morbidity and mortality. Contents include research objectives, key questions, and a description of the research agenda development process. The appendices contain logic models, examples of model interventions, and a quality assessment of literature reviews on suicide burden and prevention. An accompanying action plan is also available.

Contact: National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, 1025 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 572-3784 E-mail: info@ActionAllianceforSuicidePrevention.org Web Site: http://actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Research, Strategic plans, Suicide prevention

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2014. The relationship between bullying and suicide: What we know and what it means to schools. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information to improve schools' understanding of and ability to prevent and respond to bullying- and suicide-related behaviors. Contents include research on bullying and suicide, and what school personnel can do and where they can find more information.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Bullying, Child mental health, Data linkage, Prevention, Suicide, Youth

California Mental Health Services Authority and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. 2014. Social media guidelines for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. Reston, VA: Entertainment Industries Council, TEAM Up, 6 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides tips for organizations and individuals communicating about mental health and suicide on social media to reduce stigma, increase help-seeking behavior, and help prevent suicide. Topics include social media strategy, content considerations on mental health and suicide prevention, language and images, building online engagement, privacy and safety concerns, addressing suicide-related posts by others, and additional resources.

Contact: Entertainment Industries Council, 1856 Old Reston Ave, Suite 215, Reston, VA 20190, Telephone: (703) 481-1414 Secondary Telephone: 800-783-3421 Fax: (703) 481-1418 E-mail: eiconline@eiconline.org Web Site: http://www.eiconline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Electronic communications, Media, Mental health, Social interaction, Social responsibility, Suicide prevention

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Suicide risk in adolescents, adults, and older adults: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources summarize the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations on screening for suicide risk in adolescents, adults, and older adults in primary care. Contents include a recommendation statement, an evidence report, a clinical summary, a consumer fact sheet, and an evidence synthesis.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Guidelines, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Screening, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Suicide prevention: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. 2014. Action Alliance framework for successful messaging. Washington, DC: Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help people messaging about suicide to develop messages that are strategic, safe, positive, and make use of relevant guidelines and best practices. Topics include why and how the framework was developed including background research, why it is important, and how it is unique; principles of effective communications, key planning steps, and tips for messaging strategically; message "don'ts," tips for messaging safely, and how safety fits into the framework; ways to be positive, tips for conveying a positive narrative, and how positive narrative fits into the framework; and guidelines for specific types of messaging. Additional resources and examples that illustrate the framework are included.

Contact: National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, 1025 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 572-3784 E-mail: info@ActionAllianceforSuicidePrevention.org Web Site: http://actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Mass media, Planning, Public health education, Research, Safety, Strategic plans, Suicide

Abram KM, Choe JY, Washburn JJ, Teplin LA, King DC, Dulcan MK, Bassett ED. 2014. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors among detained youth. U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 11 pp. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin )

Annotation: This bulletin examines suicidal thoughts and behaviors among 1,829 children and adolescents (ages 10 to 18) in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal study of children and adolescents detained at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago, IL. Contents include a description of the study literature review and methods, and a discussion of the findings. Topics include hopelessness, thoughts about death and dying, thoughts about suicide, suicide plan, telling someone about suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorders that may increase the odds of suicide attempts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attempted suicide, Children, Juvenile justice, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychiatric disorders, Risk factors, Self destructive behavior, Statistical analysis

Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Injury Research Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Mental Health America of Wisconsin. 2014. Burden of suicide in Wisconsin 2007-2011. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the burden of suicide in Wisconsin. Topics include the extent and costs of suicidal behavior, the incidence and geographical distribution of suicide, and the implications of the data and their application to strategies for suicide prevention. Additional contents include a glossary, technical notes, and tables that provide supplemental information to the tables, figures, and data presented in the body of the report. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, One West Wilson Street, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (608) 266-1865 Secondary Telephone: (888) 701-1251 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Attempted suicide, Costs, Incidence, Population surveillance, Risk factors, Risk taking, Statistical data, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Wisconsin

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2014. Suicide screening and assessment. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, 5 pp.

Annotation: This publication introduces two approaches to evaluating suicide risk and provides links to resources that offer additional guidance on choosing and implementing suicide screening and assessment programs. Topics include the difference between suicide screening and suicide assessment, when people are screened or assessed for suicide risk, the effectiveness of suicide screening and assessment, what experts recommend about suicide screening and assessment, and how to choose a suicide screening and assessment instrument or program. An annotated list of resources is included.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Mental health programs, Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Risk assessment, Screening, Suicide

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term influence of moderate-to-severe depressive or suicidal symptoms in adolescence on the transition to adulthood. The brief describes an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to assess the likelihood that participants were positioned to make a healthy transition to adulthood by their mid/late twenties and early thirties. Topics include factors predicting moderate or multiple problems and higher-risk transitions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Depression, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychosocial predictors, Risk factors, Substance use, Suicide, Transitions, Young adults

Hertz MF, ed. 2013. The relationship between youth involvement in bullying and suicide. Journal of Adolescent Health 53(Suppl. 1):S1-S54,

Annotation: This journal supplement explores bullying and suicide among adolescents. Contents include eight articles that convey the complexity of the relationship between bullying (as perpetrators and/or victims) and suicide-related behaviors. Topics include suicidal thinking and behavior among adolescents involved in verbal and social bullying; psychological, physical, and academic correlates of cyberbullying and traditional bullying; inclusive anti-bullying policies and reduced risk of suicide attempts in lesbian and gay adolescents; suicidal ideation and school bullying experiences; potential suicide ideation and its association with observing bullying in school; suicidal adolescents' experiences with bullying perpetration and victimization during high school as risk factors for later depression and suicidal thinking or behavior; acutely suicidal adolescents who engage in bullying behavior; and precipitating circumstances of suicide among adolescents (ages 10-17) by sex.

Contact: Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, 111 Deer Lake Road, Suite 100, Deerfield, IL 60015, Telephone: (847) 753-5226 Fax: (847) 480-9282 E-mail: sam@adolescenthealth.org Web Site: http://www.adolescenthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Mental health, Policy analysis, Risk factors, School health, Suicide

Suicide Prevention Resource Center, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. A strategic approach to suicide prevention in high schools. Waltham, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center; [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, (Research to practice)

Annotation: This web site provides materials for an overview of research on school-based suicide prevention programs and identifies resources that can be helpful in developing and implementing a program. It offers examples of how two states developed programs to prevent suicide in a variety of school systems, including those serving ethnically diverse students. The web site contains a webinar, briefs, toolkits, an additional video, and presentations.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Prevention programs, School age children, School health programs, Suicide, Suicide prevention

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2013. Roles in suicide prevention. Waltham, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 11 files.

Annotation: These sheets provide information for people in positions that bring them in contact with individuals who may be at risk for suicide. Each sheet is customized to a specific role and setting, and includes: co-workers, corrections professionals, faith community leaders, emergency medical services providers, law enforcement officers, managers, school mental health providers, and teachers. Additional resource sheets are available for parents/guardians/families, survivors of suicide loss, and adolescents.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Attempted suicide, Resources for professionals, Suicide prevention

Acosta JD, Ramchand R, Becker A, Felton A, Kofner A. 2013. RAND suicide prevention program evaluation toolkit. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation, 177 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides guidance on evaluating suicide prevention programs (SPPs), focusing on programs sponsored by the Department of Defense. Topics include identifying core program components and building a logic model, designing a program evaluation and selecting measures, and analyzing and using data to improve SPPs. A user's guide and a summary of program evaluation studies by type are included.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Mental health, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Suicide prevention

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. 2012. Preventing suicide: A toolkit for high schools. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 229 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to help high schools, school districts, and their partners design and implement strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health among students. Topics include getting started, helping at-risk students, after a suicide, staff education and training, parent and guardian education and outreach, student programs, and screening. Tools are included for each topic. Additional resources and handouts are also presented.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4669.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Education, High school students, Outreach, Programs, Resource materials, School health, Screening, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Training

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.