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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (1,282 total).

Larsen B. n.d.. Activity Analysis II: Solution of the linear programming problem. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, Systems Development Project , 34 pp. (Comment series no: 0-1 (27))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to present a solution algorithm for the general linear programming problem of providing decision-makers in human organizations a with tools that will enable him to make decisions in an orderly fashion and with as much precision as possible. Particular emphasis is placed on basic concepts and fundamental principles, i.e., motivation and simplicity of explanation rather than on rigorous proofs and technical details. The aim of the paper is to make more effective communication and cooperation between the non-managerial mathematician and the non-mathematical manager. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Administration, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Decision making, Management information systems, Program evaluation

Hallstrom BJ. n.d.. Utilization of nursing personnel: A task specific approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 14 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (30))

Annotation: This paper seeks to establish a theoretical rationale for task delegation of nursing personnel based on the concept of independent and delegated functioning. Preliminary findings from a study of how a sample of projects are utilizing nursing and other personnel in performance of selected tasks is also presented, along with their view as to ideal utilization of personnel for performing these tasks, and the consensus of their judgment as to the type, whether independent or delegated, each task is deemed to be. Such task analysis is discussed as the first step in developing the criteria for interchangeability of personnel and delegation of tasks, and for optimal utilization of personnel within comprehensive health care programs. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Nurses, Personnel management, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Tunick FL, Butterweck JE, Landman PD. n.d.. Parental evaluation of health care delivery in a children and youth project. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 9 pp. (Comment series no: 0-7 (31))

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to describe a method used to assess community acceptance of a program to deliver comprehensive health care to children of low income families in New York City and to report the results. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs, Low income groups, New York, Program evaluation, Program evaluation, Questionnaires

Haugen IH. n.d.. A comparison between the social work profession and the nursing profession: Philosophy, theory and practice. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 25 pp. (Comment series no: 0-10 (34))

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Larsen B. n.d.. The role of theoretical research and model building in the health care sciences. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 18 pp. (Comment series no: 3-6 (46))

Weckwerth V. n.d.. One valuation: A tool or a tyranny—II. [Minneapolis, MN]: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 16 pp. (Comment series no: 9-11 (22))

De Geyndt W. n.d.. Evaluation of health programs: An annotated bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 107 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (9))

Annotation: This bibliography is a revision and updating of comment series no. 7-9 (4) with the addition new sources and annotations for all sources. This publication supersedes the previous non-annotated bibliography, "Bibliography on Evaluation of Health Programs." This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Bibliographies, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Health services, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Weckwerth VE. n.d.. The comprehensive hardware store: An analogy prepared in response to a request for the difference between comprehensive health care and other care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (10))

Dahl T. n.d.. The systems development project accounting system: A framework for cost-effectiveness analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 19 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-6 (17))

Annotation: This paper describes the output-oriented accounting system of the Systems Development Project used to perform economic analysis of the Children and Youth Program projects. This is part of a series to document and assess the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Accounting, Administration, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Economics, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Larsen B. n.d.. A generalization of the volume effect and its application in cost-effectiveness analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 36 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-6 (18))

Annotation: This paper discusses the problems of the Children and Youth Program projects in obtaining cost reporting data to provide comparable data for inter-project comparisons and for comparisons of a specific project to an image of itself of theoretical perfection. This is part of a series to document and asses the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Administration, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Cost effectiveness, Economics, Program evaluation

[University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project. n.d.. Performance profile. [Minneapolis, MN]: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, [26 v.?]

Annotation: These quarterly reports for the Children and Youth Program consist of selected performance variables preceded by a chart which displays the range and median for each variable together with the number of projects with usable data, project attributes, an analysis of the variables by two selected attributes–operating unit and region, and values for performance index for each project for the reported quarters. This is part of a series to document and asses the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Assessment, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Program evaluation, Reports, Title V programs

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Project performance: An analysis by ranks. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 29 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-10 (9))

Annotation: This paper presents a method of comparative composite scoring of project performance for use in the Children and Youth Program. Seven proxy indicators measuring project performance in health care delivery for comprehensive health care projects are used. By means of a transformation procedure, individual performance measures are converted into a single score measuring composite project performance. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Statistical analysis

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Ranking of reporting performance among Children and Youth Projects. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 21 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (10))

Annotation: This paper is an analysis focusing on the completeness, consistency, and timeliness of reports submitted for Children and Youth Program grant continuation. This is intended as an administrative tool for identification of areas where action can be most effectively applied toward replanning, reorganizing, reallocation of resources, redirection, and modified supervision of ongoing services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Reports, Statistical analysis

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. A rank order method for assessing the Children and Youth Program. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 15 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (12))

Larsen B. n.d.. Activity analysis V: Equilibrium conditions in the general linear programming model. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 10 pp. (Quantods series no.: 3-5 (13))

Larsen B. n.d.. Quantitative methods of evaluation: Verification and accuracy analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 13 pp. (Quantods series no.: 3-7 (14))

Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management. n.d.. Child Health and Illness Profile: Adolescent Edition—[Program description packet]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Department of Health Policy and Management, 44 pp.

Annotation: This information packet describes an integrated framework for a comprehensive self-report measure of adolescent health appropriate for 11 to 17 year olds who can read English on at least a fifth grade level. The six domains of health, and subdomains that make up each, are briefly described. The other enclosure provides sample questions from each of the 20 subdomains and from the demographics section. Copies of four articles about this program are also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, 624 North Broadway, Suite 493, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 955-3625 Contact Phone: (410) 955-9725 Fax: (410) 614-9152 Contact E-mail: ariley@jhsph.edu Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/HPM Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Measures, Questionnaires, Self evaluation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.