Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

Michigan State Board of Education. 2016. State Board of Education statement and guidance on safe and supportive learning environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Education, 9 pp.

Annotation: These voluntary guidelines are intended to support schools in creating an inclusive environment for all students in Michigan. Contents include best practice strategies for school districts to create a supportive learning environment with specific guidance on supporting transgender and gender nonconforming students. Definitions are included.

Contact: Michigan State Board of Education, 608 W. Allegan Street, Lansing, MI 48909, Telephone: (517) 373-3324 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-5373---,00.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child health, Child safety, Civil rights, Health promotion, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Learning, Michigan, Nonconformity, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, School districts, Schools, Sex characteristics, Sex role, Sexual harassment, Students, Violence prevention, Work force

Richards J. 2015. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2014. Suicide prevention among LGBT youth: A workshop for professionals who serve youth. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, 4 files.

Annotation: This toolkit contains workshop materials to build the capacity of schools, youth-serving organizations, and suicide prevention programs, with the larger goal of reducing suicidal behavior among LGBT youth. The leader's guide contains information about the history of the workshop; goals and objectives; intended audience; co-leaders; an overview of the workshop kit; instructions on workshop preparation, implementation, and follow-up; and a sample agenda, attendance sheet, exercise, certificate of attendance, and leader feedback form. The toolkit also includes handouts and presenter slides and notes.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cultural competence, Homosexuality, Injury prevention, Mental health services, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health services, Self injurious behavior, Suicide prevention, Training materials, Youth

Ryan C. 2014. A practitioner's resource guide: Helping families to support their LGBT children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 15 pp.

Poirier JM, Fisher SK, Hunt RA, Bearse M. 2014. A guide for understanding, supporting, and affirming LGBTQI2-S children, youth, and families. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This resource provides general information for service providers, educators, allies, and community members who seek to support the health and well-being of children and youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and/or two-spirit (LGBTQI2-S) and their families.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Children, Cultural competence, Educational materials, Families, Homosexuality, Sexuality, Social support, Systems of care, Youth

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2014. LGBTQ youth and sexual abuse: Information for mental health professionals. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 7 pp.

Greenesmith H, Cray A, Baker K. 2013. The Affordable Care Act and LGBT families: Everything you need to know. Washington, DC: Center for American Progress, Family Equality Council, 7 pp.

Annotation: This guide helps couples and parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, understand how the Affordable Care Act benefits LGBT people and their families. The guide provides a basic overview of the Affordable Care Act, reviews provision and explains how to access services.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Families, Health care reform, Health insurance, Homosexuality

Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Best practices: Creating an LGBT-inclusive school climate—A teaching tolerance guide for school leaders. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This guide for school leaders provides information about how to create a tolerant environment at school that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The guide discusses building an inclusive school climate and preventing and addressing problems (such as bullying and harassment).

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Bullying, Homosexuality, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Prevention, Schools, Sexual harassment, Sexuality, Tolerance

Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Bullied: A student, a school and a case that made history. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This website describes a documentary film geared toward middle school and high school students, administrators, teachers, and counselors that chronicles one student's ordeal at the hands of anti-gay bullies and offers a message of hope for those fighting harassment. The film is intended to help create a safer school environment for all students, help students understand the toll bullying takes on victims, and encourage students to stand up for classmates who are being harassed. The film, which is 40 minutes in length, includes closed captioning and Spanish subtitles. Also included is a viewer's guide with lesson plans and activities that can be used in staff development. Additional related resources are available on the website.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Consumer education materials, High schools, Homosexuality, Middle schools, Safety, Sexual harassment, Spanish language materials, Staff development, Tolerance

Masiello MG, Schroeder D. 2013. A public health approach to bullying prevention. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 355 pp.

Annotation: This book presents a public health approach to bullying prevention for parents and professionals looking for advice on specific facets of school-based bullying. The book focuses on public health strategies to provide a scientific approach to community planning, the use of evidence-based programs, coalition development, and the ability to change the culture in a school and community to one that is positive and strong. Topics include social and mental health consequences of bullying; practical implications for school administrators; health consequences; creating healthy school climates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students; best practices; foundations of coalition building; community engagement; a call to action for schools and legislators; and program sustainability.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $50 (non-members), plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-87553-203-5.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Homosexuality, Mental health, Public health, School linked programs, School safety, Schools, Social factors, Students, Violence prevention

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Pearsall CC. 2013. Equity for all: Entry points to elevate LGBT health. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This report focuses on ways that health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people can be improved. The report introduces the issue and discusses how the Affordable Care Act may help improve access to health care for LGBT people, supporting cultural competence initiatives and policy, and reducing tobacco use (which is more common among LGBT people than among non-LGBT people).

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cigarette smoking, Cultural competence, Health care reform, Homosexuality, Initiatives, Legislation, Sexuality, Smoking cessation programs, Tobacco use

American Institutes for Research. 2013. Improving emotional and behavioral outcomes for LGBT children/youth: A strategic planning tool (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 8 pp.

Annotation: This strategic-planning tool is intended to help support efforts of those working in organizations and communities to identify action to improve services and supports for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children and adolescents and their families. The tool includes a table organized around 10 standards of care that provide a framework for improving outcomes and well-being of LGBT children and adolescents. The standards include (1) assessment and continuous quality improvement, (2) nondscrimination policies, (3) staff knowledge and development, (4) documentation, data collection, and information sharing, (5) safe, supportive environments, (6) practices that affirm identity, (7) healthy and supportive peer connections, (8) family connections, (9) access to affirming services and supports, and (10) community outreach and engagement.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (877) 334-3499 Fax: (202) 403-5454 E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://www.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Adolescents, Communities, Data, Families, Family support services, Homosexuality, Outreach, Peer support programs, Public policy, Quality assurance, Social support, social services

Healthy Teen Network. [2012]. The unique sexual and reproductive health needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 2 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides data on American adolescents (ages 13 to 18) from 1990 to 2002 who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ). It includes statistics on the percentage of adolescents who identify as LGBTQ; describes the sexual and risk-taking behavior of this population; discusses the increased risk of sexuality transmitted infection (STIs), HIV, and pregnancy; points to the absence of sex education courses and materials that address sexual orientation; describes the difficulties that LGBTQ adolescents face in obtaining information, services, and support; and provides tips to help individuals, educators, and organizations successfully include LGBTQ youth. A resource list provides links to related websites.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Homosexuality, Psychosocial development, Sexuality education, Statistics, Youth

Camacho A. 2012. Top health issues for LGBT populations: Information and resource kit. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 58 pp.

Annotation: This resource kit presents an overview of current health issues among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. It describes the top physical, behavioral, and sexual health issues and examines the prevalence of substance abuse within each of these populations. Included are helpful terms for prevention specialists and healthcare providers, a discussion about gender identity, selected web-based resources, and powerpoint slides that focus on the top health issues for the LGBT populations. The tools in the kit may be used separately or together and are intended to help raise awareness of the physical and behavioral health status and needs of the LGBT populations.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health promotion, Homosexuality, Psychosocial development, Public awareness materials, Sexuality, Social discrimination

Goode T, Fisher SK. 2012. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural and linguistic competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to LGBTQ youth and their families. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist is designed to help personnel provide services and support to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth and their families that are culturally and linguistically competent. The checklist covers the physical environment, materials and resources, communication practices, values, and attitudes. It provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster cultural diversity and cultural competence.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Assessment, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Homosexuality, Youth

Human Rights Campaign. 2012. Growing up LGBT in America: At home, at school, in the community. Washington, DC: Human Rights Campaign, 24 pp. (HRC youth survey report)

Annotation: This report, which provides information from a survey that measured key factors impacting the daily lives of over 10,000 lesbian, gay, bixexual, or transgender adolescents (ages 13-17) from every region of the United States, presents a picture of the difficulties that this population faces. The report includes a summary of the findings and presents information in the following categories: personal well-being, community, home and family, school and peers, and culture.

Contact: Human Rights Campaign, 1640 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W, Washington, DC 20036-4160, Telephone: (800) 777-4723 Secondary Telephone: (202) 216-1572 Fax: (202) 347-5323 Web Site: http://www.hrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Communities, Discrimination, Families, Homosexuality, Schools, Sexual identity, Surveys

Winter C. 2012. Responding to LGBT health disparities. St. Louis, MO: Missouri Foundation for Health, 39 pp. (Health equity series)

Annotation: This paper explores experiences among individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender that may impact their ability to lead healthy lives. The paper concludes with a review of current policies in Missouri, and offers recommendations for achieving greater health equity and improved health outcomes for all Missourians.

Contact: Missouri Foundation for Health, 415 S. 18th Street, Suite 400, St. Louis, MO 63103-2269, Telephone: (314) 345-5500 Secondary Telephone: (800) 655-5560 Fax: (314) 345-5599 Web Site: http://www.mffh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Equal opportunities, Homosexuality, Missouri, Public policy, Sex role, State initiatives

Network for LGBT Health Equity. 2012. Mpowered: Best and promising practices for LGBT tobacco prevention and control. Boston, MA: Network for LGBT Health Equity, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines best and promising practices for tobacco use prevention and control for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community using the World Health Organization’s best practices model, MPOWER (Monitor, Protect, Offer, Warn, Enforce, and Raise), which outlines the key steps for effective tobacco control programs and additional letters -- E for Evaluate (and disseminate) and D for Diversify -- to address all of the key challenges that LGBT and overlapping disparity populations face. The target audience for the report includes policy makers, grant makers, grant applicants, and tobacco control program administrations.

Contact: Network for LGBT Health Equity, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA Telephone: (617) 927-6451 E-mail: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com/contact/ Web Site: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, High risk groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention, Program improvement, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2012. Healthy People 2020 webinar on transgender health. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion,

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the new objective in Healthy People 2020's lesbian, gay, bisexual,and transgender topic area; transgender health; the development of gender identify; and health issues specific to transgender individuals. The webinar also discusses how the Affordable Care Act of 2010 affects individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) and how the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion is working to including LGBT issues in its health research. Efforts to increase access to care and improve the health of individuals with HIV/AIDS are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Access to health care, Discrimination, Gender discrimination, HIV infected patients, Health insurance, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, High risk groups, Homosexuality, Legislation, Prevention, Research, Sexual identity

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.