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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (101 total).

Rubinstein R. n.d.. The Pediatric Prevention of the New Morbidity [Final report]. , 58 pp.

Annotation: This project had two major goals. (1) The project was to consider the various models for identifying psychosocial and developmental problems and develop broad recommendations for future research directions. In addition to this critical review of the literature bearing on the new morbidity and its prevention, the project was charged with (2) considering some of the methodological issues that would need to be confronted in an evaluation of the Health Supervision Package designed by the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Committee on the Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196814.

Keywords: Infant health, Morbidity, Pediatricians, Prevention, Psychosocial disorders

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Brown M. n.d.. Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project: [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 12 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the project address the leading causes of childhood mortality in Oklahoma - motor vehicle crashes, submersions and burns. The overall methodology focused on utilization of intra- and interagency coalitions. Specific strategies included car seat loaners programs, drowning and burn prevention education activities, and smoke alarm programs. The project successfully carried out objectives related to prevention of motor vehicle injuries, drowning and burns. By empowering collaborating agencies and programs, the project has assured continuation of a focus on prevention of pediatric injuries in Oklahoma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-161569.

Keywords: Burns, Car Seats, Child, Community-Based Education Programs, Drowning, Injuries, Injury Prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle crashes, Parents, Poisons, Safety

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

Ronan L. n.d.. A Demonstration Model of Risk-Appropriate Prenatal Care System to Reduce the Incidence of Low Birthweight in Maine [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Medical Care Development, Inc. , 52 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce infant morbidity and mortality due to low birthweight, and to demonstrate a cost-effective prenatal care program which was integrated into the existing system and can be duplicated in other states. Project objectives included: reducing the incidence of low birthweight newborns in the project; reducing the incidence of women who engage in high-risk behaviors during their pregnancy; instituting a model prenatal education, counseling, referral, and followup program in physicians' offices and other sites; and enhancing the education and counseling skills of prenatal care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103258.

Keywords: Counseling, Education of Health Professionals, Education of Patients, High risk pregnancy, Infant Morbidity, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Referrals

Radley DC, McCarthy D, Hayes SL. 2017. Aiming higher: Results from the Commonwealth Fund scorecard on state health system performance–2017 edition. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, annual.

Annotation: This report ranks states on more than 40 indicators of health system performance in five broad areas: health care access, quality, avoidable hospital use and costs, health outcomes, and health care equity. It also compares and evaluates trends across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adults, Children, Dental care, Equal opportunities, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, Infants, Measures, Morbidity, Mortality, Obesity, Oral health, Preventive health services, Smoking, State initiatives, Statistics, Systems development, Trends

Isbell M, Simpson I. 2015. Saving lives, protecting futures: Progress report on the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. New York, NY: Every Woman Every Child, 109 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, an international initiative to promote partnership, coordinate, and coherence in efforts to prevent women's and children's deaths and improve lives, advances made over the past five years, and how they have been achieved. Topics include progress in reducing maternal and child mortality and morbidity, catalyzing innovation to improve women's and children's health, accountability for results for women and children, mobilizing essential resources for women's and children's health, lessons learned, and building on gains to date in the post-2015 era.

Contact: Every Woman Every Child, United Nations Foundation, 801 Second Avenue, Suite 900, New York, NY 10017, Web Site: http://www.everywomaneverychild.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, International health, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Prevention, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, Strategic plans

National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health. 2014. Women of color health data book (4th ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health, 98 pp.

Annotation: This document is intended for use by policy makers and advocates of women's health issues. It addresses issues of minority women's health, covering Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, with special attention to adolescent and elderly women. Information is presented about life expectancy, major causes of death, behavior and lifestyles, risk factors, prenatal health care services, access to health insurance and services, and morbidity and mortality. The document includes numerous graphs, and a list of references. It concludes with recommendations to improve the health of women of color.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-4000 Secondary Telephone: (301) 402-9612 Fax: (301) 496-0017 E-mail: NIHInfo@OD.NIH.GOV Web Site: http://www.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH 98-4247.

Keywords: Adolescent health, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Morbidity, Older adults, Risk factors, Statistics, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2014. The health consequences of smoking: 50 years of progress–A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 943 pp., exec. summ. (22 pp.).

Annotation: This report chronicles the consequences of 50 years of tobacco use in the United States. Topics include the relationship between smoking and health outcomes; smoking-attributable morbidity, mortality, and economic costs; patterns of tobacco use among children, adolescents, and adults; status of and future directions in tobacco control; and a vision for ending tobacco-caused death and disease.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Cause of death, Children, Costs, Disease prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Progress reports, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2014. Let's make the next generation tobacco-free: Your guide to the 50th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 20 pp.

Annotation: This consumer guide details the effects of smoking including nicotine addiction and serious disease. It also contains facts on the benefits of quitting smoking and free resources that are available to smokers who want to quit. The guide is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Cause of death, Children, Consumer education materials, Costs, Disease prevention, Morbidity, Mortality, Progress reports, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. 2014. The PMNCH 2014 accountability report: Tracking financial commitments to the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, 56 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.).

Thomas T. 2013. Maternal health from 1985-2013: Hopeful progress and enduring challenges. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation, 17 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a brief history of the maternal health field, including estimates of the number of women who die in developing countries from complications of pregnancy, abortion attempts, and childbirth; global policies and initiatives; and the manifesto for maternal health post-2015. It also discusses trends in funding for international maternal health and the future of the maternal health field.

Contact: MacArthur Foundation, 140 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60603, Web Site: http://www.macfound.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, History, International health, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality

Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative. 2012. Exploring health conditions in the 2009/10 NS-CSHCN (Rev. ed.). [Portland, OR]: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from the 2009/2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) and the specific health conditions that these children experience. The report provides statistics on the percentage of CSHCN who experience one or more of 20 different health conditions ranging from intellectual disability to chronic physical problems to mental health issues (depression or behavioral problems, for example). The report discusses the prevalence of multiple health conditions among CSHCN and describes how these conditions can impact families. The report also provides statistics on the percentage of children who meet the core outcomes on systems of care for CSHCN established by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: https://childhealthdata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child morbidity, Children with special health care needs, National surveys, Outcome and process assessment, Statistics

University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program. [2011]. Model health and safety policies: Safe sleep policy for infants in child care programs. San Francisco, CA: University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, 1 p.

Annotation: This document provides safe sleep guidelines for infants in child care programs. The document lists steps that programs can take to reduce the risk for sudden infant death syndrome, sudden unexpected infant death, and the spreading of contagious disease. Steps cover sleep environment, pacifier use, smoking, breastfeeding, and tummy time.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-4695 Web Site: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Child care centers, Guidelines, Infant death, Infant health, Infant morbidity, SIDS, Prevention, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. CDC health disparities and inequalities report -- United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60(Suppl.):1-113,

Annotation: This report consolidates national data on disparities in mortality, morbidity, behavioral risk factors, health care access, preventive health services, and social determinants of critical health problems in the United States. The focus is on disparities in selected health determinants and outcomes by sex, race and ethnicity, education, income, disability status, and geography. Topics include education and income, housing, air quality, health insurance, influenza vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, infant deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths, suicides, drug-induced deaths, coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, homicides, obesity, preterm births, hospitalizations, asthma, HIV infection, diabetes, hypertension, binge drinking, adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and cigarette smoking. The rationale for regular reporting on health disparities and inequalities and recommendations for universally applied and targeted interventions are included.

Contact: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Health behavior, Health statistics, Health status disparities, Intervention, Morbidity, Mortality, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Social indicators

Main E, Oshiro B, Chagolla B, Bingham D, Dang-Kilduff L, Kowalewski L. 2011. Elimination of non-medically indicated (elective) deliveries before 39 weeks gestational age: A California toolkit to transform maternity care [rev. ed]. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, 130 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which incorporates policies and tools used at U.S. hospitals, outlines best practices and provides support materials and guidance for implementing a quality-improvement project focused on reducing elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation. The toolkit also provides methods to identify improvement opportunities and outlines techniques for measuring process and outcome improvements. Topics include the importance of eliminating deliveries before 39 weeks, implementation, data collection and quality improvement, and clinician and patient education.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Child morbidity, Childbirth, Education, Guidelines, Infant morbidity, Maternal morbidity, Outcome evaluation, Perinatal morbidity, Prevention, Process evaluation, Programs, Resource materials, Trends

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. Ten great public health achievements--United States, 2001-2010. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60(19):619-623,

Annotation: This report summarizes 10 noteworthy achievements in public health during 2001-2010. They include vaccines for vaccine-preventable diseases; prevention and control of infectious diseases; tobacco control; reduction in the number of infants born with neural tube defects and an increase in screening for metabolic and other heritable disorders; motor vehicle safety; cardiovascular prevention; occupational safety; cancer prevention; childhood lead poisoning prevention; and public health preparedness and response.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health policy, Morbidity, Mortality, Public health

Children's Defense Fund. 2010. Protect children, not guns. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the incidence of fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries to children and adolescents. Text provides general information, and several tables provide statistical information about firearm deaths to children and adolescents.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, Child morbidity, Child mortality, Firearm injuries, Firearms, Safety

Amnesty International Secretariat. 2010. Deadly delivery: The maternal health care crisis in the USA. London, UK: Amnesty International Secretariat, 138 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses maternal mortality and morbidity and the provision of health care within the context of human rights and offers recommendations to improve maternal health care in the United States. The report is based on research carried out during 2008 and 2009 by Amnesty International USA. In particular, the report focuses on maternal deaths and complications from pregnancy-related causes. The report provides recommendations and discusses maternal health and human rights, discrimination and maternal health, barriers to maternal health care services, systemic failures, and accountability.

Contact: Amnesty International Secretariat, Peter Benenson House, 1 Easton Street, London, UK WC1X ODW, Telephone: 44(0)20-7413-5500 Fax: 44(0)20-7956-1157 Web Site: http://www.amnesty.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-86210-458-0.

Keywords: Childbirth, Costs, Ethnic factors, Health care systems, Human rights, Income factors, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality, Pregnancy, Racial factors, Reproductive health, Women's health

Every Woman Every Child. 2010. Global strategy for women's and children's health. New York, NY: United Nations Foundation, 19 pp.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.