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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (268 total).

Singh,P. n.d.. An Investigation of the Influence of G-6-PD Deficiency on Certain Hemoglobinopathies in a Comprehensive Health Care Project for Children and Youth [Final report]. Nashville, TN: Meharry Medical College, 5 pp.

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Baby Blossoms [Collaborative]. n.d.. Nothin' but Baby!. [Omaha, NE]: Douglas County Health Department,

Annotation: This public awareness campaign provides information and resources for health professionals, families, and other caregivers on how to put infants to sleep safely to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected infant death (including deaths attributed to overlaying, accidental suffocation, wedging, and sudden infant death syndrome). Contents include a tip sheet, brochure, and poster in English and Spanish. Additional resources include a sample safe sleep policy for child care facilities; a safe sleep quiz for parents and other caregivers; a bookmark with tips on comforting a crying infant; and a flyer, poster, insert, and billboard about suffocation.

Contact: Baby Blossoms Collaborative, Douglas County Health Department, 1111 South 41st Street, Omaha, NE 68105, Telephone: (402) 444-7471 E-mail: http://babyblossomsomaha.org/about-bbc/contact-us Web Site: http://babyblossomsomaha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Campaigns, Crying, Infant death, Local initiatives, Primary prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Spanish language materials, Suffocation, Unintentional injuries

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Health Equity. 2022. Oral health equality project reports. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Health Equity, 1 web resource.

Annotation: This toolkit includes resources related to the project, including a community-engagement survey available in English and in Spanish, an oral health status and knowledge survey, a discussion guide for facilitators to use with communities to learn about children’s oral health needs in the Worcester and Holyoke communities, and oral health profiles for Worcester and Holyoke. A data sheet that provides information about efforts to improve access to oral health care for black and Hispanic children ages 10–14 in these Massachusetts communities is also available.

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Office of Health Equity, 250 Washington St., 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5590 Web Site: https://www.mass.gov/orgs/office-of-health-equity Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Community programs, Health equity, Hispanic Americans, Massachusetts, Oral health

Hernandez-Cancio S, Gray V. 2021. Racism hurts moms and babies. Washington, D.C.: National Partnership for Women and Families; National Birth Equaity Collaborative , 7 pp. (Moms and Babies )

Annotation: This publication explores the link between interpersonal and community-level racism and its impact on preterm birth, lower gestational age at birth, and infant low birth weight. Rather than focusing on individual behaviors that put pregnant people of color at higher risk of poor health outcomes, the authors describe how the toxic stress of racism affects physiological processes. One in a ten-part series of publications titled Saving the Lives of Mothers and Babies produced jointly by the National Partnership for Women and Families and the National Birth Equity Collaborative.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org

Keywords: Blacks, Infant health, Low birthweight, Maternal health, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Racial factors, Racism, Risk factors

Ellmann N. 2020. Community-based doulas and midwives . Washington , DC: Center for American Progress , 37 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key perspectives, lessons learned, and policy recommendations for state- and federal-level initiatives that center around the work of doulas and midwives in addressing the nation’s maternal health crisis.The report discusses racial disparities in maternal and infant morbidity and mortality and describes how birth workers can help reduce health risks, particularly among black and indigenous individuals giving birth. Information and perspectives shared by doulas and midwives interviewed for the report fall into three major categories: 1) the role and importance of community-based birth workers and the re-centering of the community in pregnancy-related care; 2) guidelines for health care system integration and the role of government; and 3) the creation of a progressive vision for pregnancy-related care in the United States.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org

Keywords: Alaska natives , American Indians, Barriers, Blacks, Childbirth, Community health services, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality, Midwives, Pregnancy, Prevention services, Racial factors, Racism, Risk factors, Social support

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Health and health care for all: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section. 2015. Infant mortality reduction plan for Minnesota, part one: A partnership between the Minnesota Department of Health and the residents of Minnesota. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section, 79 pp.

Annotation: This document for stakeholders in the private, public, academic, or non-profit sectors outlines a strategic plan to address the infant mortality problem in Minnesota, particularly persistent racial and ethnic disparities in poor birth outcomes. Contents include background and key findings on the sources of long-standing disparities in infant mortality, particularly among American Indians and African Americans, and perspectives on what changes could be made in systems, policies, and practices to improve birth outcomes. Additional contents include broad recommendations to further reduce infant mortality in the state; vision, goals, and objectives; and a call to action.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 Fax: (651) 201-3590 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/mch/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Barriers, Blacks, Community action, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Infant mortality, Minnesota, Racial discrimination, Statewide planning, Strategic plans

Tappin K. 2015. Inequities in maternal and child health: An analysis of policy, practice, and social determinants over the life-course. Greenbelt, MD: Mid Atlantic Health Policy Research Consortium, 43 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the social determinants experienced over the life course and their influence on adverse birth outcomes for black women in Maryland. Contents include background on Maryland and data on maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes in Baltimore City, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, and on the Eastern Shore; vital statistics data on the health of mothers and infants in Maryland; and a set of proposals to strengthen Maryland's policies and programs around MCH.

Contact: Health Policy Research Consortium, CTIS, 6401 Golden Triangle Drive, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770, Telephone: (301) 375-2021 Fax: (240) 582-7846 E-mail: info@hprc.info Web Site: http://hprc.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Blacks, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Infants, Life course, MCH programs, MCH research, MCH services, Maryland, Mothers, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Pregnant women, Program development, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Statistical data, Women

National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health. 2014. Women of color health data book (4th ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health, 98 pp.

Annotation: This document is intended for use by policy makers and advocates of women's health issues. It addresses issues of minority women's health, covering Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, with special attention to adolescent and elderly women. Information is presented about life expectancy, major causes of death, behavior and lifestyles, risk factors, prenatal health care services, access to health insurance and services, and morbidity and mortality. The document includes numerous graphs, and a list of references. It concludes with recommendations to improve the health of women of color.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-4000 Secondary Telephone: (301) 402-9612 Fax: (301) 496-0017 E-mail: NIHInfo@OD.NIH.GOV Web Site: http://www.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH 98-4247.

Keywords: Adolescent health, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Morbidity, Older adults, Risk factors, Statistics, Women', s health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Strategies for behavioral health organizations to promote new health opportunities in African American communities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp.

McDaniel M, Popkin SJ, Berman J, Barahona P, Saxena P, Quint D, Teach SJ. 2014. Making sense of childhood asthma: Lessons for building a better system of care. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key findings from a qualitative exploratory study about asthma care for African American and Latino children ages 4-14 from families with low incomes in Washington, DC. Topics include poor housing, the lack of health professionals in low-income neighborhoods, the gap between acute and chronic care, barriers to asthma management, and lessons for improving asthma care and children's asthma outcomes. The appendices contain information about the study sample, recruitment, lessons learned, and focus group and one-on-one interview discussion guides.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Blacks, Children, Chronic diseases and disabilities, Critical care, Disease management, Hispanic Americans, Local initiatives, Low income groups, Pediatric care, Program improvement, Research

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2014. Overweight and obesity among African American youths. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 4 pp.

Toldson IA, Manekin SD. 2014. Building bridges: Connecting out-of-school time to classroom success among school-age Black males in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation, 74 pp.

Ohio Department of Health. (2013). Preventing infant mortality. [Columbus, OH]: Ohio Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on efforts to prevent infant mortality in Ohio. It provides information about the Ohio Department of Health's (ODH's) safe sleep campaign, its progesterone prematurity project, its prenatal smoking-cessation initiative, and its decision to add severe combined immune deficiency and critical congenital heart disease to its list of newborn screening items. ODH's project to reduce elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation, its institute for equity in birth outcomes, and its support for select communities to participate in an initiative to improve black infant mortality and prematurity rates are also discussed.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Infant death, Infant mortality, Neonatal screening, Ohio, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention services, Public awareness campaigns, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2013. It's only natural: Mother's love, mother's milk. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health,

Annotation: This website offers information to help African-American new mothers and their families understand the benefits of breastfeeding, make breastfeeding work, and get the support they need to breastfeed their infants.Topics include planning ahead, breastfeeding myths, overcoming challenges, finding support, and fitting breastfeeding into women's lives. One woman's breastfeeding story is also presented, and links to related information are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Consumer education materials, Families, Infant health, Mothers, Parent support services, Public awareness campaigns, Women', s health

CityMatCH, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Healthy Start Association, EveryWoman Southeast. 2013. Addressing racism's impact on infant mortality: Lessons learned from the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (60 min., 24 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar explores the persistent gap in infant mortality between white and black infants and how to address challenges and opportunities. The experiences of 11 community and state teams and partners in addressing racism's impact on infant mortality are shared and lessons learned are described with actionable steps for programs to take. Examples are provided from California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Ohio, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Case studies, Community programs, Infant death, Infant mortality, Multimedia, Racial factors, Racism, State initiatives

CityMatCH, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Healthy Start Association, EveryWoman Southeast. 2013. Putting the life course concept into practice: Lessons from the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (60 min., 29 sec.). (A lifecourse theory to practice webinar)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast June 6, 2013, discusses the life course theory and the capacity of the approach to address health inequalities for African American women as experienced by the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition, The Magnolia Project. It also discusses strategies for integrating the life course approach into a community-based program, and describes challenges and opportunities to integrating this approach into daily practice.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Blacks, Case studies, Florida, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Healthy Start, Life cycle, Women', s health

Kenney GM, Coyer C, Anderson N. 2013. Racial and ethnic differences in access to care and service use for children with coverage through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 28 pp. (Low-income working families, paper 23)

Annotation: This paper discusses evidence that black and Hispanic children with Medicaid/CHIP coverage may have more problems accessing care, relative to their white counterparts, in two areas: specialty and mental health care. It also discusses the need for further study to explore both the causes and the potential implications of these patterns.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Children, Children', Health care financing, Hispanic Americans, Medicaid, Mental health services, Special health care services, s Health Insurance Program

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.