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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (121 total).

Milwaukee Healthy Women and Infants Project. n.d.. Equal opportunity: The effective management connection. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Healthy Women and Infants Project, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This manual is designed to help individuals further understand how equal employment laws, policies, and practices affect community outreach programs. There are six modules: 1) management policies and equal opportunity laws; 2) personnel selection; 3) equal opportunity and managing performance; 4) the workplace environment; 5) communicating across cultures; and 6) management perspectives. Each module presents key points and includes practice exercises. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Milwaukee Healthy Women and Infants Project, 40 West Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 350, Milwaukee, WI 53233, Telephone: (414) 345-4500 Fax: (414) 345-4505 E-mail: Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Communities, Employment, Equal opportunities, Manuals, Milwaukee Healthy Start, Outreach, Personnel, Training materials, Workplace

New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. n.d.. Making it work toolkit. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, multiple items.

Annotation: These toolkits for consumers and employers provide information to address the challenges of low income wage earners returning to work while continuing to breastfeed. Contents include five individual toolkits. A toolkit for mothers provides information on how to talk with supervisors, coworkers, and child care providers and how to store and handle breast milk, as well as checklists, tips, sample schedules, and food ideas. A toolkit for family members explains the role grandparents and partners play while dispelling myths that can be held by others, and how to give support and care for a breastfed infant. Additional toolkits are designed to help employers comply with state and federal laws; offer guidance for mothers and employers on interpreting the laws and resources; and provide sample letters and policies.

Contact: New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, Telephone: (866) 881-2809 E-mail: dohweb@health.state.ny.us Web Site: http://www.health.ny.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Employer initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, New York, State programs, Supported employment, Workplace health promotion

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. Pathways to family leadership within AMCHP. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document defines the term "family leader" and describes the roles for family leaders in the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs' activities. Topics include title, eligibility criteria, selection process, timeline, and duties.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Contact Phone: (202) 775-1472 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Contact E-mail: mjarvix@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Teaching, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Volunteers, Work force

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. 2016. Roles of family staff or consultants within Title V MCH and CYSHCN programs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses various roles, and activities within these roles, of families who are in paid positions as staff or consultants to state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs. Topics include roles for family engagement in the Title V Block Grant guidance; depth of engagement (family roles along a continuum); roles and activities by level of engagement (input, partnership, service provision, policy-level leadership); and family engagement in Title V needs assessment activities.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Needs assessment, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Training, Work force

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Healthy transitions: A pathway to employment for youth with chronic health conditions and other disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief presents research findings about the relationship between disability (including chronic conditions), health and wellness, and transition and employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. The brief also examines the role health care professionals play in establishing employment expectations. Contents include information about the study methods, transition planning, and recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Employment, Outcome and process assessment, Role, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Young adults

Hynes M. 2014. Don't call them dropouts: Understanding the experiences of young people who leave high school before graduation. Washington, DC: America's Promise Alliance, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from interviews and surveys of young people across the United States about what leads to leaving school before graduation. Contents include findings on the relationship between interrupted enrollment and family violence and abuse; school safety; violence in the neighborhood; personal and family health challenges; unsupportive or unresponsive school policies; family abandonment (death, incarceration, other events); family absence; instability of place (residential mobility, school mobility, homelessness); school salience; peer influence and support; and school and community support.

Contact: America's Promise Alliance, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0600 Fax: (202) 657-0601 E-mail: info@americaspromise.org Web Site: http://www.americaspromise.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, Adverse effects, Educational attainment, Graduation, Life course, National surveys, Resilience, Risk factors, School attendance, School dropouts, School failure, Social support, Supported employment

Kaye K, Gootman JA, Ng AS, Finley C. 2014. The benefits of birth control in America: Getting the facts straight. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the benefits to women, men, children, and society of pregnancy planning and the use of birth control in particular. Topics include reduced unplanned pregnancy and abortion, improved maternal and infant health, improved family well-being, advancement in women's education and employment, and benefits to society.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-082-6.

Keywords: Abortion, Contraception, Costs, Educational attainment, Employment, Family health, Family planning, Infant health, Maternal health, Unplanned pregnancy

National Network for Oral Health Access. 2014. An analysis of 2013 health center oral health provider recruitment, retention, and job satisfaction survey results. Denver, CO: National Network for Oral Health Access, 45 pp. (Published September 2014. (JMB))

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of executive directors, dentists, and dental hygienists working in health centers throughout the United States to assess salaries, job satisfaction, and recruitment and retention strategies. Contents include information about survey distribution and survey response, an analysis, and survey results. The narrative also provides selected tables and figures; additional analyses and the survey instruments are included in the appendices.

Contact: National Network for Oral Health Access, 181 East 56th Avenue, Suite 501, Denver, CO 80216, Telephone: (866) 316-4995 Fax: (866) 316-4995 E-mail: info@nnoha.org Web Site: http://www.nnoha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health centers, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Employment, Job satisfaction, National surveys, Oral health, Recruitment, Retention, Salaries

Hickson M, Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Donofrio G, Cook J. 2013. Feeding our human capital: Food insecurity and tomorrow's workforce—Part II of II. Boston, MA: Boston Medical Center, Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is the second in a two-part series, provides information about food insecurity among children and the work force of the future. The brief defines food insecurity and human capital and discusses problems associated with childhood food insecurity, how food insecurity is related to a child's chances of graduating from high school, the effects of failing to graduate from high school, how childhood food insecurity affects health in adulthood, costs of food insecurity to society, and how early childhood development programs and nutritional interventions can serve as an investment in human capital that strengthens the work force of the future.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adult health, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Educational attainment, Employment, Graduation, Hunger, Intervention, Low income groups, Nutrition, Prevention, Programs, School readiness, Work force, Young children

Sandstrom H, Huerta S. 2013. The negative effects of instability on child development: A research synthesis. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 57 pp. (Low-income working families, discussion paper 3)

Annotation: This paper, which is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers and practitioners concerned with programs and services for children and families, explores the literature on the effects of instability on children's developmental outcomes and academic achievement. The authors review and synthesize research evidence on five identified domains of instability: family income, parental employment, family structure, housing, and school and child care. Also discussed are key pathways through which instability may affect development, including the role of parenting, parental mental health, and the home environment.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child care, Child development, Children, Employment, Families, Income factors, Life course, Mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Programs, Public policy, Research, Schools, Services

National Collaboration for Youth. 2012. Building a brighter future: An essential agenda for America's young people. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Collaboration for Youth, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report presents federal public policy recommendations that are intended to improve children's health, safety, and well-being, and improve the education system with the goals of saving money, strengthening families, producing a more educated work force, and laying a base for America that will thrive into the next century. Topics covered include early childhood, education, after-school and summer programs, child welfare, healthy children and adolescents, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, runaway and homeless adolescents, adolescent services, and adolescent employment.

Contact: National Human Services Assembly, 1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 347-2080 Fax: (202) 393-4517 E-mail: wowens@nassembly.org Web Site: http://www.nassembly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, After school programs, Child health, Early childhood education, Education, Employment, Homelessness, Juvenile delinquents, Poverty, Prevention, Public policy, Runaways, Safety

Chrisler A, Moore KA. 2012. What works for disadvantaged and adolescent parent programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social programs and interventions for children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about programs that work and do not work to improve outcomes for adolescent parents with low incomes and their children. The fact sheet reviews 20 parenting programs that are geared toward enhancing parents' development, educating them about effective parenting methods, or both. The fact sheet introduces the issue and reports findings for programs in six outcome areas: child outcomes: health; child outcomes: behaviors and development; parent outcomes: reproductive health; parent outcomes: mental health and behaviors; parent outcomes: education, employment, and income; and parenting outcomes. Promising approaches and future research needs are also discussed.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behaviors, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child development Parent support programs, Child health, Education, Employment, Family income, High risk groups, Low income groups, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Reproductive health, Research

Lippman L, Guzman L, Moore KA. 2012. Measuring flourishing among youth: Findings from the Flourishing Children Positive Indicators Project. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from a webinar presented by Child Trends on July 19, 2012, that discussed the Flourishing Children Positive Indicators Project, which developed constructs to measure positive indicators in adolescents. Topics include project purpose, measurement issues, project steps, cognitive interview findings, and constructs (relationship skills, flourishing in relationships, flourishing in school and work, helping others to flourish, environmental stewardship, and personal flourishing).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent employment, Adolescent health, Educational attainment, Relationships, Research, Self esteem

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

Grantmakers in Health. 2011. Supporting children's healthy development: Place DOES matter. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief examines how communities where children live contribute to their healthy development. It describes how community-level factors such as education, employment, housing, neighborhood conditions,and access to quality care care -- the social determinants of health -- have a powerful influence on child health outcomes. The brief describes how success can be achieved using place-based approaches to child health outcomes and how investing in intensive place-based strategies is a promising way to tackle the factors that influence individual and community health outcomes. Examples of efforts taking place at the local level are included.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community programs, Education, Employment, Factor analysis, Life course, Local initiatives, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Research, Socioeconomic factors

Chatterji P, Makowitz S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2011. Early maternal employment and family wellbeing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 48 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17212)

Annotation: This study examines the effects of maternal employment on family well-being, measured by maternal mental and overall health, parenting stress, and parenting quality. Using longitudinal data from the Study on Early Child Care (SECC) conducted by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the authors first estimate the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes when children are 6 months old and then use dynamic panel data models to examine the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes during the first 4.5 years of children’s lives. Detailed findings are presented in table format.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Child health, Employment, Family health, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Parenting, Research, Working mothers, Young children

Robin Morris, ed. and Autism Speaks, Family Services Team. 2011. Transition tool kit: A guide to assist families on the journey from adolescence to adulthood. [New York, NY]: Autism Speaks, ca. 115 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for parents of adolescents with autism provides options to help plan for the transition to adulthood. The kit is divided into the following sections: self-advocacy, why transition plans are needed, community living, employment and other options, post-secondary educational opportunities, housing, legal matters, health, internet and technology, and getting organized. At the end of most sections are resources specific to that section as well as forms to help keep track of the transition process. Timelines for each state, with state agency information, are also provided.

Contact: Autism Speaks, 1 East 33rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 252-8584 Fax: (212) 252-8676 E-mail: contactus@autismspeaks.org Web Site: http://www.autismspeaks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent with special health care needs, Advocacy, Autism, Consumer education materials, Education, Employment, Employment programs, Housing, Legal issues, State programs, Supported employment, Technology, Transition planning

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Work and family. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 2, Fall 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines a variety of work-family conflicts and assess their effects both on the well-being of American employees and their families and on the productivity of American employers. The authors also suggest approaches to help working parents meet the challenges of work-family conflict. The issue includes articles on the following topics: work and families; changing families, changing workplaces; policies to assist parents with young children; families with school-age children; children with health problems; families and elder care in the twenty-first century; workplace flexibility; the government's role in work-family conflict; and international perspectives on work-family policies.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-7-3.

Keywords: Children with special heath care needs, Employment, Families, Government role, Older adults, Public policy, School age children, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Aud S, KewalRamani A, Frohlich L. 2011. America's youth: Transitions to adulthood. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, 171 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the lives of adolescents and young adults ages 14-24 in the United States over the last several decades. The report features status and trend data on the following topics: demographics, school-related characteristics, employment-related characteristics, activities outside of school and work, health and wellness, and future goals.

Contact: National Center for Education Statistics, 1990 K Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 502-7300 Secondary Telephone: (202) 502-7442 Fax: (202) 219-1736 Web Site: http://www.nces.ed.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NCES 2012-026.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescents, Educational attainment, Employment, Goals, Health, Statistical data, Trends, Young adults

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2010. State profiles in comprehensive family participation. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides examples of initiatives and strategies implemented by state Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) and Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs to ensure strong family participation (FP) within their programs. The brief summarizes how Colorado, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Oregon, and Washington approach FP, including insights, successes, and challenges. Topics include the history of FP, partnerships, strategies to involve and compensate families, training and technical assistance, the value of the CYSHCN performance measure, FP in MCH, pressures on Title V MCH programs, barriers to FP, lessons learned, and future plans. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Community participation, Employment, Families, Measurement, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Work force

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.