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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (73 total).

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McCormick L, Lovell S, Neltner T. 2017. Grading the nation: State disclosure policies for lead pipes. New York, NY: Environmental Defense Fund, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an analysis of housing disclosure policies of all U.S. states and the District of Columbia according to their ability to help homebuyers make informed decisions about lead service lines before they sign a sales contract. Contents include information about lead in drinking water and why reducing exposure to lead is important, property disclosures, variation and limitations of state requirements, and conclusions. State disclosure requirements are included in the appendix.

Contact: Environmental Defense Fund, 257 Park Avenue, South, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (800) 684-3322 E-mail: https://www.edf.org/contact Web Site: https://www.edf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Decision making, Environmental health, Housing, Lead, Policy analysis, Public policy, Safety, State legislation, Water

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2016. Promoting health equity. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to promote health equity in the community. Topics include education programs and policies, culturally competent health care, and housing programs and policies. Presentation and promotional materials are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early childhood education, Low income groups, After school programs, Child development centers, Community based programs, Community development, Community health centers, Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Education, Educational attainment, Equal opportunities, Financial support, Health care delivery, Health education, Health promotion, Housing, Kindergarten, Patient education materials, Public policy, Recruitment, Research, Retention, School based clinics, Training, Translation, Work force

Rose K, Miller TK-N. 2016. Healthy communities of opportunity: An equity blueprint to address America's housing challenges. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between health and housing in urban policy; national housing trends and their implications for health; promising movements in the field to connect opportunity, health, and housing policy; and a policy framework to advance equity in health and housing.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cities, Costs, Equal opportunities, Hazards, Health status, Housing, Policy development, Reform, Regulations, Trends, Zoning

Bassuk EL, DeCandia CJ, Beach CA, Berman F. 2014. America's youngest outcasts. Waltham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 3 items.

Annotation: This report documents the number of homeless children in every state, their well-being, their risk for child homelessness, and state-level planning and policy efforts. The report also ranks the states in four domains, and presents a composite of these domains to rank the states from 1 (best) to 50 (worst). A page about the District of Columbia is also available.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Homeless persons, Housing, Socioeconomic conditions, State surveys, Statistical data

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

McDaniel M, Heller C, Adams G, Popkin SJ. 2014. Designing a home visiting framework for families in public and mixed-income communities. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 18 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes some of the key issues that program planners and early childhood leaders need to consider in designing appropriate and responsive home visiting programs for families in public and mixed-income housing. Topics include the unique needs of families in a public and mixed-income housing context and essential features of a home visiting framework such as program content, delivery, and infrastructure. Next steps for research and planning are also discussed.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Home visiting, Low income groups, Models, Program planning, Public housing, Socioeconomic factors, Young children

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2012. Fostering healthy families through stable housing: The role of the health care system. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 3 pp. (Fact sheet: Women, children and adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses where children experiencing housing instability and homelessness access health care and what health plans and health plan foundations can do to support healthy, affordable housing. It also examines what health plans and health plan foundations are already doing in this area. Additional contents include information about children in the foster care system and a list of resources. A webinar on this topic, held on July 26, 2012, is also available from the website.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Foster children, Foundations, Health care systems, Health plans, Homeless persons, Housing, Multimedia

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2011. Leading change: A plan for SAMHSA's roles and actions 2011-2014. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic initiatives that the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has identified to guide its work through 2014. For each initiative, background is presented, along with an issue statement and specific goals and objectives. The strategic initiatives discussed include: (1) prevention of substance abuse and mental illness; (2) trauma and justice; (3) military families; (4) health care reform implementation; (5) housing and homelessness; (6) heath information technology; (7) data, outcomes, and quality; and (8) public awareness and support.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge (hipping charges may apply); also available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health care reform, Homelessness, Housing, Information, Initiatives, Mental health, Military, Outcomes, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistical data, Strategic plans, Substance abuse, Trauma

Robin Morris, ed. and Autism Speaks, Family Services Team. 2011. Transition tool kit: A guide to assist families on the journey from adolescence to adulthood. [New York, NY]: Autism Speaks, ca. 115 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for parents of adolescents with autism provides options to help plan for the transition to adulthood. The kit is divided into the following sections: self-advocacy, why transition plans are needed, community living, employment and other options, post-secondary educational opportunities, housing, legal matters, health, internet and technology, and getting organized. At the end of most sections are resources specific to that section as well as forms to help keep track of the transition process. Timelines for each state, with state agency information, are also provided.

Contact: Autism Speaks, 1 East 33rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 252-8584 Fax: (212) 252-8676 E-mail: contactus@autismspeaks.org Web Site: http://www.autismspeaks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent with special health care needs, Advocacy, Autism, Consumer education materials, Education, Employment, Employment programs, Housing, Legal issues, State programs, Supported employment, Technology, Transition planning

Desiderio G, Max J, Scott ME, Ikramulah E, Barry M, Manlove J. [2010]. Bricks, mortar, and community: The foundations of supportive housing for pregnant and parenting teens. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Washington, DC: Child Trends, 2 v.

Annotation: This two-volume report identifies a set of core components for supportive housing programs serving pregnant and parenting adolescents and identifies case studies of programs that meet these standards. The first volume, Core Components of Supportive Housing, lists and discusses five core components. Examples of supporting housing programs that integrate the core components are also presented. The second volume, Findings from the Field, provides findings related to program demographics for programs serving pregnant and parenting adolescents as well as findings related to program services. Both volumes discuss strategic approaches for identifying the core components, provide background on pregnant and parenting adolescents, and define key terms used.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Case studies, Housing, Housing programs, Pregnant adolescents, Programs

Macomber J, Isaacs J, Vericker T, Kent A. 2010. Public investment in children's early and elementary years (birth to age 11). Washington, DC: Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overarching view of investments in children and illuminates critical decision points and questions for policymakers. The brief looks at public investments from birth through the elementary years. Topics include how much is invested in children at different ages; how federal spending compares with state and local spending; how the federal government invests in each age group in the areas of health, nutrition, education and social services, income support, and housing; the portion of federal resources targeted toward children from families with lower incomes; and whether funding is being directed to the most critical areas. Analysis methods are discussed, as well.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Children, Education, Family support services, Federal programs, Financing, Health, Housing, Local programs, Low income groups, Nutrition, Public policy, Social services, State programs

March E, Cook JT, Ettinger de Cuba S, Gayman A, Frank DA. 2010. Healthy families in hard times: Solutions for multiple family hardships. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on low-income families facing multiple hardships during difficult economic times. The report discusses measuring and understanding the impact of hardship, the effect on multiple hardships on children, integrated solutions to multiple hardships, whether multiple benefits can offset the impact of multiple hardships, and recommendations.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Housing programs, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Outreach, Poverty, Program coordination, Social services

Sell K, Zlotnik S, Noonan K, Rubin D. 2010. The effect of recession on child well-being: A synthesis of the evidence by PolicyLab, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Washington, DC: First Focus, 41 pp.

Annotation: This research paper synthesizes evidence of the effects of recession on child well-being. It examines four domains – health, food security, housing stability, and maltreatment – and reviews the relationship of each to the well-being of children during periods of economic downturn. Included are key findings indicating that it can takes years for families to bounce back to their previous income levels after a recession but that public programs play a role in blunting the negative impacts.. The paper presents trend data over time and provides lessons learned from prior recessions in efforts to foster more informed policy making related to child well being.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Data, Economic factors, Family economics, High risk children, Housing, Nutrition, Policy development, Research, Trends

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined and assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 18 in relation to the preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies, by building upon the evaluations of other entities and reviewing their findings, conclusions, and recommendations. The report includes findings, conclusions, and recommendations on the following topics: physical health, mental health, and trauma; child care; child welfare; elementary and secondary education; sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; transportation; juvenile justice; evacuation; and relevant activities in emergency management.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no. 10-M037; ISBN 978-1-58763-401-7.

Keywords: Adolescent heath, Adolescents, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Costs, Disaster planning, Education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Infants, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Transportation, Trauma

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Washington, DC: National Commission on Children and Disasters, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study that assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents in relation to preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies. The report includes specific findings, conclusions, and recommendations relating to (1) child health, mental health, and trauma; (2) child care in all settings; (3) child welfare; (4) elementary and secondary education; (5) sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; (6) transportation; (7) juvenile justice; (8) evacuation; and (9) relevant activities in emergency management. The report also provides specific recommendations on the need for planning and establishing a national resource center on children and disasters and discusses the coordination of resources and services, administrative actions, policies, regulations, and legislative changes.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child care, Child health, Costs, Disaster planning, Disasters, Elementary education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Juvenile justice, Legislation, Mental health, Public policy, Research, Secondary education, Service coordination, Transportation, Trauma

[2009]. Helping pregnant and parenting teens find adequate housing. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document provides an overview of housing-related legal and policy issues with which advocates for young families should be familiar. it lists programs that assist with finding and paying for housing (Section 8, Family Unification Program, Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program) and programs that provide housing (maternity group homes, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, transitional housing, extended support for foster youth. It discusses whether minors can enter into valid leases for housing, what emancipation is and how youth can become emancipated, and what individuals can do to help pregnant and parenting teens find housing. Numerous legislation is cited.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Family support services, Housing, Pregnant adolescents

Healthy Teen Network. 2009. A policy platform to promote health and success among young families. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report constitutes a set of federal policy recommendations aimed at establishing or reforming programs and systems that influence whether young families may achieve health and success after a birth to adolescent parents. The report discusses young families' needs and gaps in resources and services according to the following seven life domains: (1) health and human services, (2) housing, (3) education, (4) work force and life skills development, (5) child welfare and development, (6) income security, and (7) knowledge development and transfer.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent development, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child development, Child health, Education, Families, Family income, Health services delivery, Housing, Programs, Public policy, Services, Work force

Aratani Y. 2009. Homeless children and youth: Causes and consequences. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses the causes and consequences of homelessness in children and adolescents. Topics include who homeless children and adolescents are, contributing factors, the impact of homelessness in children and adolescents, current policies and practices, and key recommendations.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child welfare, Children, Economic factors, Education, Families, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Housing programs, Legislation, Mental health, Public policy, Violence

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.