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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

School Health Education Bibliography

School Health Education

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 37 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on educational materials and curricula for teachers of school health from the preschool through high school level.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 37 records.

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2015. School health profiles: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 191 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

Advocates for Youth, Answer, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2014. National teacher preparation standards for sexuality education. [no place]: Future of Sex Education, 7 pp.

Annotation: These standards provide guidance to programs within institutions of higher education in order to better prepare undergraduate pre-service students to deliver sexuality education to children and adolescents in middle and high schools, focusing on programs that train health and physical education teachers. Contents include seven standards, along with a rationale, set of indicators, and examples. Topics include professional disposition, diversity and equity, content knowledge, legal and professional ethics, planning, implementation, and assessment.

Contact: Future of Sex Education, Web Site: http://www.futureofsexed.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Preservice training, Professional education, Sexuality education, Standards, Teachers

American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2014. Bicycle safety curriculum. Reston, VA: American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 3 items.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to help elementary-, middle-, and high-school-educators and recreation professionals teach safe bicycling to children. The two-part curriculum is aligned with the National Standards for K-12 Physical Education and includes lessons and assessments for the skills and knowledge students need to enjoy safe bicycling. It also contains a guide for parents on ways they can support safe bicycling, including guidance on selecting an appropriate bicycle and helmet for their child.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bicycle helmets, Bicycle safety, Consumer education materials, Curricula, Injury prevention, Recreational safety, School age children, Schools, Transportation injuries

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Healthy Schools Campaign, Trust for America's Health. [2013]. Health in mind: Improving education through wellness. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 80 pp.

Annotation: This report presents recommendations for changes at the federal level to improve the health and academic performance of students in public elementary and secondary schools. The report begins with a discussion of health barriers to learning and educationally relevant health disparities including illness and injury, asthma, mental health issues, obesity, sexual health issues, vision and hearing impairment, and oral disease. Additional topics include preparing teachers and principals to promote student health and wellness, engaging parents to improve outcomes, incorporating health and wellness into school metrics and accountability, incorporating health and wellness into recognition programs, building capacity within the U.S. Department of Education to address student health and wellness, and placing a school nurse in every school.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Interagency cooperation, Learning, Policy development, Program coordination, School age children, School health, Schools, Service integration

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health and SHAPE America. 2013. National framework for physical activity and physical education. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a multi-component approach by which school districts and schools use all opportunities for students to be physically active; meet the nationally-recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day; and develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime. The document presents components of a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) to include quality physical education as the foundation; physical activity before, during, and after school; staff involvement; and family and community engagement Resources to support CSPAPs such as cross-cutting documents, data sources, assessment and policy tools, and topical resources are also included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Community participation, Comprehensive programs, Family centered services, Family school relations, Interdisciplinary approach, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School age children, School districts, School health programs, Schools

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health and Division of Population Health. 2013. National health education standards. Atlanta, GA: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: These standards present written expectations for what students should know and be able to do by grades 2, 5, 8, and 12 to promote personal, family, and community health. The standards provide a framework for curriculum development and selection, instruction, and student assessment in health education.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curriculum development, Oral health, School age children, School health education, Standards

National Education Association Health Information Network. 2013. Rx for understanding: Preventing prescription drug abuse–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 104 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 9-12. Contents include 10 lessons that lead students through an inquiry-based, technology inspired project enabling an opportunity to apply the key concepts learned about the misuse, abuse, and proper use of prescription drugs. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, a reproducible student journal, teaching resources, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Secondary schools, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

National Education Association Health Information Network. [2012]. Rx for understanding: Be smart about prescription drugs–Educator's resource guide. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 120 pp.

Annotation: This standards-based, cross-curricular teaching resource is geared for students in grades 5-8. Contents include five sequenced lessons for grades 5-6 and five sequenced lessons for grades 7-8. Each set of lessons acts as a mini-unit, focusing on the same five lesson themes: relating the issue of prescription drug safety to overall health, understanding proper use, understanding misuse, understanding abuse, and conducting an application-based culminating project. The guide includes background information, lesson plans, reproducible student activity sheets, parent information, and national academic standards alignment charts (including National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards).

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Middle schools, Prescription drugs, Safety, School health education, Substance abuse prevention, Teaching

Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™. 2012–. Dental professionals. New York, NY: Colgate-Palmolive Company, multiple items. (Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™ series)

Annotation: These resources for oral health professionals focus on promoting good oral health habits among young children and their families. Contents include a video, posters, an activity sheet, materials for parents, a coloring sheet, and a report card. Topics include toothbrushing, flossing, and mouth rinsing.

Contact: Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™, 300 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: (800) 468-6502 Secondary Telephone: (212) 310-2000 Web Site: http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/HomePage.cvsp Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Resources for professionals, Young children

Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™. 2012–. For teachers. New York, NY: Colgate-Palmolive Company, multiple items. (Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™ series)

Annotation: These resources for educators focus on oral health in pregnant women, infants, and young children. Contents include activity guides for Early Head Start, Head Start, and other early childhood programs that were developed in accordance with the skill areas and child outcomes contained within the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework. Guides for kindergarten through third grade, mobile applications, songs, posters, storybooks (in English and Spanish), a flip chart, a video, and educational games are also available.

Contact: Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™, 300 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: (800) 468-6502 Secondary Telephone: (212) 310-2000 Web Site: http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/HomePage.cvsp Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood education, Educational materials, Head Start, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Oral health, Pregnant women, School age children, School health education, Spanish language materials, Young children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2012. Health education curriculum analysis tool (HECAT). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This resource provides guidance and appraisal tools for assessing a health education curriculum. Contents include an overview of school health education, curriculum, and curriculum selection and development; step-by-step guidance for organizing a health education curriculum review and conducting an analysis; tools for scoring the accuracy and acceptability of curriculum content, feasibility of implementation, and affordability of the curriculum materials; tools for scoring fundamental characteristics of a health education curriculum; and tools for scoring concepts and skills relevant to topics such as alcohol and other drugs, healthy eating, mental and emotional health, physical activity, safety, tobacco, and violence. Forms for summarizing appraisal scores for a single curriculum or comparing scores across curricula are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curricula, Early childhood education, Educational objectives, Health education, Schools, Teaching

Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™. 2012. Bright Smiles, Bright Futures: Brushy Brushalotamus in Your Classroom—Teacher's guide for pre-K programs. New York, NY: Colgate-Palmolive Company, 12 pp. (Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™ series)

Annotation: This guide for early childhood educators focuses on oral health in young children. The activities in the guide were developed in accordance with the skill areas and child outcomes contained within the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework. Contents include five lesson plans, a coloring page, a maze, and a family pledge and certificate. Topics include toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste, eating healthy snacks, and visiting the dentist regularly. Additional resources are available.

Contact: Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™, 300 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: (800) 468-6502 Secondary Telephone: (212) 310-2000 Web Site: http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/HomePage.cvsp Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood education, Educational materials, Head Start, Kindergarten, Oral health, Preschool education, School health education, Young children

Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™. 2012. Dr. Rabbit and the Tooth Defenders: An oral health activity for grades K–1. New York, NY: Colgate-Palmolive Company, 20 pp. (Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™ series)

Annotation: This health education program guide is designed to help teachers integrate oral health into an existing curriculum for students in kindergarten and grade 1. The program uses a standards-based approach to cover core learning objectives that can be adapted to classroom needs. The guide contains developmentally appropriate lesson plans designed to challenge children to take responsibility for their own oral health. Ideas for getting parents and other family members involved with the topic of oral health are included throughout the guide. Additional program components include a video featuring two cartoon dentists who have mentored a group of children to become Tooth Defender "superheroes;" a storybook; a poster; and a parent packet.

Contact: Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™, 300 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: (800) 468-6502 Secondary Telephone: (212) 310-2000 Web Site: http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/HomePage.cvsp Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Educational materials, Elementary schools, Kindergarten, Oral health, School health education, School health programs

Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™. 2012. Dr. Rabbit and the Tooth Defenders: An oral health education program for grades 2–3. New York, NY: Colgate-Palmolive Company, 24 pp. (Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™ series)

Annotation: This health education program guide is designed to help teachers integrate oral health into an existing curriculum for students in grades 2–3. The program uses a standards-based approach to cover core learning objectives that can be adapted to classroom needs. The guide contains developmentally appropriate lesson plans designed to challenge children to take responsibility for their own oral health. Ideas for getting parents and other family members involved with the topic of oral health are included throughout the guide. Additional program components include a video featuring two cartoon dentists who have mentored a group of children to become Tooth Defender "superheroes;" a storybook; a poster; and a parent take-home.

Contact: Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures™, 300 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: (800) 468-6502 Secondary Telephone: (212) 310-2000 Web Site: http://www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/HomePage.cvsp Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Educational materials, Elementary schools, Oral health, School health education, School health programs

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, Best Practices Committee. 2011–. Best practice approaches: Proven and promising best practices for state and community oral health programs. [Reno, NV]: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, multiple items.

Annotation: This report focuses on best practices for the use of fluoride in schools. It discusses fluoride as a measure to prevent tooth decay in children, different types of programs that provide fluoride to children, and different forms of fluoride. Evidence for the efficacy of fluoride in preventing tooth decay and best practice criteria are provided. The report also includes state practice examples.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Model programs, Oral health, Public health services, State programs

Center for Mississippi Health Policy. 2011. Year two report: Assessing the impact of the Mississippi Healthy Students Act. Jackson, MS: Center for Mississippi Health Policy, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of implementing regulations aimed at preventing childhood obesity in Mississippi by improving nutrition, physical activity, and health education in public schools. The report focuses on findings from research examining the relationship between students' fitness and academic performance, onsite reviews of the nutrition environment in schools, surveys of parents and school officials, and interviews with key legislators. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Mississippi Health Policy, Plaza Building , 120 North Congress Street, Suite 700, Jackson, MS 39201, Telephone: (601) 709-2133 Fax: (601) 709-2134 E-mail: info@mshealthpolicy.com Web Site: http://mshealthpolicy.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Mississippi, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Policy development, Prevention programs, School age children, School health education, School health programs, State regulations

Adelman HS, Taylor L. 2010. Mental health in schools: Engaging learners, preventing problems, and improving schools. [Thousand Oaks, CA]: Corwin , 310 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a new approach to school-based mental health with the goal of better serving students, maximizing resources, and promoting academic performance. The book discusses how educators can effectively coordinate internal and external resources to support a healthy school environment and to help students who are at risk overcome barriers to learning. Topics include an overview of the history and current state of school mental health programs, strategies for effective school-based initiatives, and a call to action for high-quality mental health programming in public schools.

Contact: Corwin Press, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, Telephone: (805) 499-9734 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-9936 Fax: (805) 499-5323 Web Site: http://www.corwinpress.com/ $35.75, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Financing, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Initiatives, Mental health, Programs, School health, School health programs, School health services, Schools, Students

Basch CE. 2010. Healthier students are better learners: A missing link in school reforms to close the achievement gap. New York, NY: Campaign for Educational Equity, 107 pp. (Equity matters: Research review no. 6)

Annotation: This research review focuses on educationally relevant health disparities that can impede motivation and the ability to learn among urban minority youth. It explores the evidence linking health and academic achievement and discusses strategies to help schools implement health programs that would reduce health disparities. It also discusses the importance of emphasizing health as a fundamental part of elementary and secondary education and examines national, state, and local responsibilities in supporting school health. The review focuses on the following seven health factors that disproportionately affect the educational opportunities and outcomes of urban minority youth: vision, asthma, breakfast, physical activity, teen pregnancy, aggression and violence, and inattention and hyperactivity. Proven and promising practices are discussed.

Contact: Campaign for Educational Equity, Columbia University Teachers College, Box 219, 525 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 678-3291 E-mail: equity@tc.edu Web Site: http://www.tc.edu/equitycampaign Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Health education, Health status, Learning, Minority health, Motivation, School age children, Schools health, Urban health

National Association for Sport and Physical Education and American Heart Association. 2010. 2010 shape of the nation report: Status of physical education in the USA. Reston, VA: National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on the status of physical education in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. It emphasizes the importance of quality, daily physical education programs for all school-age children and provides information that can be used as a basis for expanding and improving physical education programs in those states that need assistance. Areas covered include standards, curriculum and instruction; exemptions/waivers and substitutions; student assessment and program accountability; physical education teacher certification/licensure; National Board Certification in physical education; state physical education coordinator requirements; grade level mandates and time requirements; and body mass index (BMI) collection.

Keywords: Advocacy, Health promotion, Physical education, Program evaluation, Reports, School age children, State programs

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2010. School health programs: Stories from the field. [Atlanta, GA]: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights successful school health programs supported with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the states of Wisconsin, North Carolina, and California. The programs include (1) Wisconsin's Coordinated School Health Program, which has developed and supported initiatives to reduce tobacco use and increase physical activity and healthy eating among students, their families, and school staff; (2) the North Carolina Healthy Schools Initiative which supported development and implementation of school policies to advance the state's youth antismoking campaign; and (3) the California Department of Education's School Health Connections Program (in collaboration with the state Department of Health Services) to conduct state- and local-level leadership institutes designed to help build, promote, and sustain school health programs.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Model programs, North Carolina, School health, State initiatives, Wisconsin

Tucci J. 2010. Connecting youth to quality health information: A lesson plan for high school health and fitness education. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Center for Public Health Nutrition, 8 pp.

Annotation: This high school health and fitness education lesson plan is designed to increase student's capacity to access and evaluate quality health information. Contents include a guide to evaluating online health information, a MedlinePlus tutorial, and a case study role play. An online health information scorecard, in-class case study activity, and homework assignments are provided for handouts.

Contact: University of Washington, Center for Public Health Nutrition, 306 Raitt Hall, Box 353410, Seattle, WA 98195, Fax: (206) 685-1696 E-mail: uwcphn@u.washington.edu Web Site: http://www.cphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evaluation methods, Health literacy, High schools, Information sources, School health education

[Newhart V]. 2009. Oral health education. [Helena, MT]: Montana Department of Health and Human Services, Family and Community Health Bureau, Mutliple items.

Annotation: These learning modules are intended for students in 1st through 5th grades in Montana. Each module focuses on one grade level and provides a summary of objectives, along with optional activities. Learning objectives and a list of materials are provided for each activity. Additional resources such as links to organizational websites and handouts are also included. Topics are addressed as age-appropriate and include tooth development and structure, tooth decay, oral disease, and injury prevention. All modules address oral hygiene and nutrition.

Contact: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Oral Health Program, 111 North Sanders Street, Helena, MT 59620, Telephone: (406) 444-5622 Web Site: http://dphhs.mt.gov/publichealth/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Elementary schools, Health education, Montana, Oral health, School age children

Virginia Department of Health, Division of Dental Health. 2008. Curriculum resources for schools. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Division of Dental Health, (Saving Smiles series)

Annotation: This resource is designed to help school personnel meet Virginia Health Education Standards of Learning by integrating oral health into the public school health-education curriculum. The resources include curricula for educating students in kindergarten through 5th grade (Healthy Mouth, Healthy Body), and those in 6th through 10th grades (Give Teens Something to Smile About), about the impact of health behaviors on oral health and overall health. Supplemental resources such as presentations for students in 6th through 10th grades and activity sheets for the classroom are included.

Keywords: Curricula, Elementary schools, Kindergarten, Middle schools, Oral health, School age children, School health education, State programs, Virginia

Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 2007. The comprehensive school health manual [rev. ed.]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This manual addresses policy and practice of school health in Massachusetts. Topics include dimensions of school health, developing an effective school health program, comprehensive school health education, a safe and healthful environment, health assessment, nursing practice in the school setting, students requiring specialized health services, infectious disease control, nutrition, physical fitness and sports, mental health, sexuality and reproductive health, injury and violence prevention, substance abuse and addiction, oral health, and refugee and immigrant health care.

Contact: Massachusetts Health Promotion Clearinghouse, Medical Foundation, 95 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (800) 952-6637 Secondary Telephone: (617) 536-5872 Fax: (617) 536-8012 Web Site: http://www.maclearinghouse.com Available from the website. Document Number: SH3001.

Keywords: Adolescent health promotion, Child health promotion, Health policy, Manuals, Massachusetts, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, State initiatives

Action for Healthy Kids. 2006. A mission becomes a mandate: Campaign for school wellness. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the achievements of the Healthy Schools Summit 2005, during which 500 leaders from the education, physical activity, physical education, and nutrition fields convened in Washington, DC, to explore approaches for creating healthier school environments and to share ideas about what is working in schools, districts, and states across the nation. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) school wellness, (2) raising the bar for the future, (3) what Action for Healthy Kids is doing about school wellness, (4) embracing all the players -- industry, government, education, health, and philanthropy, (5) the road ahead, and (6) charting the course -- opportunities and challenges ahead.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Education, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, School health, Schools

Cama S, Parker L, Levin M, FitzSimmons C. 2006. School wellness policy and practice: Meeting the needs of low-income students. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 68 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help stakeholders in schools that serve large numbers of low-income students become active participants in the process of developing a school wellness policy. The guide begins by giving suggestions on how to engage different members of the school community in the wellness policy process and then moves on to address some of the required components of the policy and possible challenges along the way, such as increasing access to nutritious food for all students, changing the nutrition environment of the school, addressing financial concerns, and developing goals for nutrition education and physical activity. Other topics covered include establishing nutritional guidelines for all foods available at school, incorporating nutrition education into the school day, increasing physical activity at school, and after-school and summer programs. The guide includes two appendices: (1) Federal wellness policy legislation -- Section 204 of Public Law 108-265 and (2) a copy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Healthier US Schools Challenge Criteria for Elementary Schools. The guide also includes an executive summary.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Child health, Financing, Low income groups, Nutrition, Physical activity, School age children, School food services, School health, School health programs

Action for Healthy Kids. [2005]. Parents' views on school wellness practices. Skokie, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a survey conducted to learn about parents' views on school wellness programs (mandated for all schools participating in the School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs by 2006-2007) designed to help schools play a leadership role in children's nutrition and physical activity. The survey also assesses the changes that parents believe are most needed in schools. The report provides background, discusses the survey methodology, presents findings, and provides a discussion and recommendations. References are included.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Nutrition, Parents, Physical activity, School health, School health programs, School role, Surveys

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity. 2005. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: Focus on schools—Brief summary: Institute of Medicine Regional Symposium. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief summary highlights the recurring themes for accelerating change and moving forward with obesity prevention efforts that emerged from a symposium held in Wichita, Kansas, on June 27-28, 2005. The symposium focused on recommendations for schools and stakeholders in the school setting to explore how to create a healthy school environment, as outlined in the Institute of Medicine Report, Preventing Childhood Obesity, Health in the Balance. The themes include (1) forging strategic partnerships, (2) empowering local schools and communities, (3) educating stakeholders, (4) evaluating obesity prevention efforts, (5) documenting the benefits of obesity prevention, (6) innovating to address barriers, (7) using a systems approach, and (8) developing a long-term strategic plan. A symposium agenda is included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website, after registration. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-65445-9.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Obesity, Prevention, School health, Schools, Strategic plans

National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity. 2005. Model local school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, 26 pp.

Annotation: These model school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition, which are intended for use by school districts, are based on nutrition science, public health research, and existing practices from exemplary states and local school districts around the country. The policies include a background section, a discussion of how to use the policies, a list of organizations that assisted with or supported the development of the policies, and the policies themselves. Policy goals are presented, as well as steps that school districts can take to achieve the goals. The section on achieving policy goals is divided into the following subsections: (1) school health councils, (2) nutritional quality of foods and beverages sold and served on campus, (3) nutrition and physical activity promotion and food marketing, (4) physical activity opportunities and physical education, (5) monitoring and policy review, and (6) resources for local school wellness policies on nutrition and physical activity.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Health promotion, Marketing, Models, Monitoring, Physical activity, Physical education, Public policy, Resource materials, School districts, School health, Schools

Razor SD. 2005. Healthy learners: Promising practices in coordinated school health programs. Washington, DC: Council of State Governments, 4 pp. (Healthy states brief: v. 1, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief discusses Coordinated School Health Programs (CSHPs), which help students, their families, and staff by coordinating the typical programs and services provided by schools to promote health and safety. The brief explains how CSHPs act as an organizational framework to help parents, students, school personnel, and community leaders address students' health needs; identifies eight componenents of CSHPs; and discusses state action and funding. Examples of legislation from eight states are included. A list of resources is included.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Program coordination, Safety, School health, Service coordination, State programs

Napp D. 2004. Preventing HIV, STD, and teen pregnancy in schools: Connecting strategies—Evaluation of a national collaboration. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings from an evaluation of efforts to strengthen collaboration between state health agencies and state education agencies to support the improvement of HIV, STD, and adolescent pregnancy prevention in schools. The efforts were spearheaded by the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors; the National Coalition of STD Directors; and the Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, which collaborated to offer two regional stakeholder meetings and to provide follow-up technical assistance. The report includes a description of participants' satisfaction with the meetings and technical assistance, additional technical assistance needs, the extent of actions taken by states to improve collaboration, the results of these efforts, and factors that facilitated and hindered state collaboration. The report includes two appendices that contain survey questions and a telephone interview guide.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Collaboration, Education, Evaluation, HIV, Prevention programs, School health education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State health agencies, State programs, Technical assistance

Taras H, Duncan P, Luckenbill D, Robinson J, Wheeler L, Wooley S, eds. 2004. Health, mental health, and safety guidelines for schools. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics; [Castle Rock, CO]: National Association of School Nurses,

Annotation: This website presents a compendium of guidelines to help school administrators and others determine the breadth of school health, mental health, and safety issues and set priorities for action. It draws from published guidelines on specific components of school health and safety programs, as well as on overall coordination of these programs. Topics include health and safety infrastructure, programs and personnel, family and community involvement, health and safety education, physical education and activities, health and mental health services, nutrition and food services, physical environment and transportation, social environment, and staff health and safety.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coordination, Environmental influences, Guidelines, Health education, Health services, Participation, Physical activity, School health programs, School personnel, Transportation

Action for Healthy Kids. 2003. Taking action for healthy kids: A report on the Healthy Schools Summit and the Action for Healthy Kids Initiative. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights ideas and solutions shared at the Healthy Schools Summit convened in October 2002 in Washington, DC. The report sets forth the Action for Healthy Kids vision for creating health-promoting schools that support sound nutrition and physical activity. The report includes the following sections: (1) letters from Dr. David Satcher and Mrs. Laura Bush, (2) the shape of our nation's children: an epidemic of overweight and obesity, (3) charting a healthier course for students, (4) commitment to change, (5) building the link between health and achievement, (6) schools: the ideal setting for change, (7) nutrition: letting students practice what they're learning, (8) physical activity and physical education: learning in action, (9) state teams: mobilizing to take Action for Healthy Kids, (10) Healthy School Heroes: leading the way, and (11) Healthy Schools Summit Agenda. The report also includes references and a list of steering committee members.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Conferences, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, School health education, School lunch programs, Schools, Students

Marx E. 2003. Stories from the field: Lessons learned about building coordinated school health programs. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 168 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the challenge of making systemic changes in schools and school districts and examines how schools have incorporated strategies to promote student health and education outcomes. The book is divided into four parts. Part 1 describes what coordinated school health programs are and why they are needed. Part 2 discusses practical considerations for implementing such programs, highlights key questions addressed in the stories included in part 3 of the book, and summarizes lessons learned. Part 3 presents nine stores of coordinated school health programs serving a range of socioeconomic and ethnic populations in rural, suburban, and urban settings throughout the United States. Part 4 concludes with a list of print and online resources and national organizations that can provide additional information.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Education, Rural populations, School districts, School health programs, School health services, Schools, Urban populations

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, School of Medicine. 2001. Teacher Enrichment Initiatives: Curriculum–Watch your mouth. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, School of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help teachers address oral health within a multidisciplinary health science curriculum for students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Contents include descriptions of activities and related materials. Topics include anatomy, nutrition, oral hygiene, mineralization, pathology, and tooth loss and replacement. Materials include handouts, slides with scripts, and worksheets with answer keys.

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 567-7000 Web Site: http://www.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Curricula, Materials for children, Oral health, School age children, School health education, Schools

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.