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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (42 total).

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child, Adult, and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: Information for school personnel (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is meant to serve as a resource for school nurses and other school personnel to alert them to the signs and symptoms of complications of the sickle cell diseases and to educate them about what to do if they encounter a child with such signs and symptoms. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) what is sickle cell disease?, (3) warning signs, (4) what is sickle cell trait? (5) complications related to sickle cell disease, (6) medical management, (7) psychosocial issues, (8) the teacher, and (9) the social workers. The guide also includes the following appendices: (1) glossary, (2) bibliography, (3) New Jersey sickle cell/hemoglobinopathies treatment centers, and (4) New Jersey genetic centers for testing and family counseling.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic services, New Jersey, Patient care management, Psychosocial factors, School health services, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait, Social workers, Teachers

National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness. [2018]. Applying consultation skills to oral health promotion. Itasca, IL: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness,

Annotation: This video provides information about how successful consultation strategies can help child care health consultants address children’s oral health in Head Start and other early childhood education and care programs. The video discusses why good oral health in early childhood is important and describes a scenario in which a child care health consultant advises teachers in a Head Start program on how to identify whether a child with behavior issues may have an underlying health problem—specifically, an oral health problem—and how they can address the child's oral health.

Contact: National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (888) 227-5125 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/ncechw Available from the website.

Keywords: Consultation, Head Start, Oral healthy, Preschool children, Preschool education, Teachers, Young children

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

Whitebook M, McLearn C, Austin LJE. 2016. Early Childhood Workforce Index. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, biennial.

Annotation: This report describes a national initiative to spotlight the nation's early childhood education (ECE) work force and provides an appraisal of work force conditions and policies across states. Topics include earnings and economic security, early childhood work force policies, and family and income support supplies across occupations. Contents include a cross-state comparison of policy indicators representing opportunities for states to enhance the lives of children and adults affected by ECE employment conditions. Tables containing state-by-state data for each indicator and information about research or promising developments that advance new policies or improved conditions are also provided.

Contact: University of California, Berkeley, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, Berkeley, CA Web Site: http://cscce.berkeley.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood education, Measures, Policy development, State initiatives, Statistical data, Teachers, Work force

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement in schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

Salud America!. 2015. Health navigators in elementary schools increase Latinos' access to health services. [San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research], 8 pp. (Health equity success story)

Annotation: This document describes a partnership model between a local health department and a school district to eliminate barriers to health care among Latinos by embedding bilingual, bicultural health navigators in elementary schools. Topics include efforts to build awareness, frame the issue, educate and mobilize partners, debate and frame policy, make change happen, and implement an equitable and sustainable program. A video is also available.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Hispanic Americans, Access to health care, Coordination, Culturally competent services, Elementary schools, Financing, Medicaid, Model programs, Parents, Program descriptions, School districts, School health services, State programs, Students, Teachers

Allen L, Kelly BB, ed; Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success. 2015. Transforming the workforce for children birth to age 8: A unifying foundation. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; National Research Council, 706 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. It also examines the current capacities and practices of the work force, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government agencies and other funders who support and oversee these systems. Contents include recommendations to improve the quality of professional practice and the practice environment for care and education professionals. These detailed recommendations create a blueprint for action that builds on a unifying foundation of child development and early learning, shared knowledge and competencies for care and education professionals, and principles for effective professional learning.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-32485-4 .

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child development, Competence, Competency based education, Early childhood education, Financing, Infants, Learning, Paraprofessional personnel, Program development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research, Teachers, Toddlers, Training, Work force, Young children

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015. Health education curriculum analysis tool: A guide for health education teacher preparation program in institutions of higher education. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 114 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides a series of six lessons for use by instructors in institutions of higher education who are responsible for professional teacher preparation programs in health education, and in preservice courses that focus on improving health education curriculum selection and instruction. An introduction provides instructors with a synopsis of the guide, the intended outcomes of the lessons, a description of the lesson format, and essential actions to take in preparing to implement the lessons. Lessons 1–5 introduce students to the knowledge and skills prerequisite for analyzing a written single or multiple grade-level health education curricula, and then using those skills to analyze a curriculum. In lesson 6, students apply the elements of the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to develop their own health education unit plans for use in the classroom.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Curriculum development, Outcome and process assessment, Preservice training, Program improvement, Program planning, School health education, School health programs, Teachers

Huntley B, Hagen J. 2014–2016. Cavity Free Kids: Head Start and child care curriculum. Seattle, WA: Washington Dental Service Foundation, multiple items.

Annotation: This curriculum includes lessons, play-based activities, and complementary parent resources that Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, and preschool programs can use to teach children and their families about what causes tooth decay and how to prevent it. Topics include the importance of primary teeth; water and tooth-healthy foods; toothbrushing, flossing, and swishing; and visiting the dentist. Contents include circle time lessons, learning center activities, parent handouts, and family-engagement tools. A list of supplies, instructions, and Head Start learning domains and elements is included.

Contact: Washington Dental Service Foundation, P.O. Box 75983, Seattle, WA 98175-0983, Telephone: (206) 528-2373 Contact Phone: (206) 528-7339 Fax: E-mail: foundation@deltadentalwa.com Contact E-mail: kamundson@deltadentalwa.com Web Site: http://www.kidsoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Head Start, Health education, Oral health, Teachers, Training materials, Young children

Advocates for Youth, Answer, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2014. National teacher preparation standards for sexuality education. [no place]: Future of Sex Education, 7 pp.

Annotation: These standards provide guidance to programs within institutions of higher education in order to better prepare undergraduate pre-service students to deliver sexuality education to children and adolescents in middle and high schools, focusing on programs that train health and physical education teachers. Contents include seven standards, along with a rationale, set of indicators, and examples. Topics include professional disposition, diversity and equity, content knowledge, legal and professional ethics, planning, implementation, and assessment.

Contact: Future of Sex Education, Web Site: http://www.futureofsexed.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Preservice training, Professional education, Sexuality education, Standards, Teachers

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. Physical education profiles, 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 147 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes physical activity and physical education policies and practices of secondary schools (middle schools, high schools) across 26 jurisdictions (18 states, 6 large urban school districts, 1 territory, and 1 tribe). Topics include requirements, curricula and standards, instruction, student assessment, school-based intramural sports programs or physical activity clubs, teacher qualifications, and professional development.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curricula, High schools, Inservice training, Middle schools, Physical activity, Physical education, School age children, Sports, Standards, Students, Teachers

Nemours Center for Children's Health Media. 2011. Kids Health in the Classroom. [Jacksonville, FL]: Nemours Foundation,

Annotation: This web site offers teachers, school nurses, coaches, and guidance counselors free health curriculum materials for all grades and subject areas. Each teacher's guide includes discussion questions, activities, and reproducible handouts and quizzes -- all aligned to national health education standards. The web site also offers tips from teachers, information about common childhood health problems, health-related news, and resources to improve the health of students and schools. A companion web site for families is also available. Information is provided in English and Spanish.

Contact: KidsHealth, Nemours, 10140 Centurion Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Fax: (904) 697-4220 E-mail: comments@KidsHealth.org Web Site: http://kidshealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Health education, Materials for children, Spanish language materials, Teachers, Teaching

U.S. Office of Justice Programs and International Association of Chiefs of Police. 2009. Guide for preventing and responding to school violence (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Justice Programs; Alexandria, VA: International Association of Chiefs of Police, 41 pp.

Annotation: This document presents strategies and approaches for members of school communities to consider when creating safer learning environments. The document discusses the roles of administrators, teachers, staff, students, parents, the community, and law enforcement in preventing school violence, what to do during a crisis, and what to do after a crisis; threat assessment; crisis planning and preparation; legal considerations, and working with the media.

Contact: U.S. Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (800) 458-0786 Secondary Telephone: (202) 616-3867 Web Site: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Communities, Legal issues, Mass media, Parents, School age children, School role, School violence, Students, Teachers, Violence prevention

Home Safety Council. 2009. Start safe: A fire and burn safety program for preschoolers and their families. Washington, DC: Home Safety Council,

Annotation: This Web site provides information about Start Safe, a fire- and burn-safety program for preschool-age children and their families. The site provides an overview of the program and offers tools for educators to use in the classroom and community and for parents to use at home. (Registration is required to access the tools.) Relevant programs, resources, and partners are highlighted on the site, as well.

Contact: Home Safety Council, 1250 Eye Street, NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 330-4900 Fax: (202) 330-4901 E-mail: info@homesafetycouncil.org Web Site: http://www.homesafetycouncil.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Burn prevention, Consumer education materials, Families, Fire prevention, Programs, Safety, Teachers, Young children

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2006, 2000, 1994. School health policies and programs study: Questionnaires. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health,

Annotation: These questionnaires are designed to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. Components include health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services and foods and beverages available at school, healthy and safe school environment, physical school environments, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement in schools.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Food service, Health education, Health policy, Health services, Local government, Physical education, Policies, Programs, Questionnaires, Schools, State government, Survey tools, Teachers

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. 2005-. Milk matters [calcium education campaign]. Rockville, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 12 items.

Annotation: This information package contains materials from a nationwide public-health-education campaign to promote calcium consumption among adolescents, especially those ages 11–15. The package includes materials designed for parents, children, adolescents, health professionals, and teachers. Materials include booklets, logo stickers, a coloring book, a poster, lessons, fact sheets, take-home assignments, classroom discussion ideas, and a public-service announcement. A form for ordering campaign materials is included. Some items are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov

Keywords: Adolescents, Calcium, Children, Curriculum development, Materials for children, Nutrition education, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Spanish language materials, Teachers

No Name-calling Week Coalition. 2004. Organizing a No Name-calling Week in your school. New York, NY: No Name-calling Week Coalition,

Annotation: This site provides tips for involving schools and communities in planning a fun and effective No Name Calling Week. The No Name Calling Week project seeks to focus attention on the problem of name calling in schools and to provide students and educators with the tools and inspiration to launch an ongoing dialogue about ways to eliminate name calling in their communities. The fact sheet discusses how to get administrative support and how to get everyone involved. It also describes the roles of guidance staff, support staff, library staff, physical education staff, and families, and it explains how to prepare for the event. Materials to support the campaign, including a video, lesson plans, resource lists, posters, stickers, and other items, are available.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Campaigns, Children, Communities, Families, School role, Teachers

Pyramid Communications. 2003. Healthy schools for healthy kids. [Princeton, NJ]: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 46 pp.

Annotation: This report describes an investigation of programs and policies relevant to increasing children's physical activity and healthy eating in schools nationwide. The report discusses a national opinion poll of public school teachers and parents; reviews federal-, state-, district-, and school-level policy; discusses environmental policy change; and identifies and reviews in-school and after-school programs. The report includes an executive summary as well as the following sections: (1) findings, (2) recommendations, (3) promising approaches, and (4) programs reviewed.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Children, Environment, Federal policy, Nutrition, Parents, Physical activity, Public opinion, Public schools, State policy, Teachers

Lazarus W, Lipper L, Roberts K, Fireman R, Rose M. 2003. The search for high-quality online content for low-income and underserved communities: Evaluating and producing what's needed—An issue brief and action plan with research appendices. Santa Monica, CA: Children's Partnership, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document looks at questions about how to provide accessible, high-quality online information for individuals with low incomes, limited literacy or English skills, or one or more disabilities. The document examines a wide range of efforts to identify, sort, and/or create online information for different audiences--from health care consumers to teachers to non-English speakers. The document offers a set of starter guidelines for finding and creating high-quality, low-barrier content, as well as a set of specific recommendations for narrowing the content gap over the next few years. The document, which includes an executive summary, also contains the following main sections: (1) the Children's Partnership's research on content evaluation, (2) guidelines for content creation and evaluation, and (3) a blueprint for action: recommendations for key players. The document also includes five research appendices that contain supplemental information.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 1351 Third Street Promenade, Suite 206, Santa Monica, CA 90401-1321, Telephone: (310) 260-1220 Fax: (310) 260-1921 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Consumers, Disabilities, Guidelines, Internet, Limited English speakers, Low income groups, Low literacy, Teachers

Rue LA. 2003. Sexuality education policy 1990-2000: The influence of HIV and AIDS, an unintended consequence. Longmont, CO: Friends First, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report demonstrates the way HIV policy in the aftermath of the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s spawned a new paradigm of sexuality education, and it proposes a new model of prevention efforts for communities to consider. The report includes the following chapters: (1) the historical context, (2) the legal-social context, (3) the inverted triangle of secondary prevention and public schools, (4) federal level, (5) analysis of the narrative--special interest groups, (6) state level, (7) role of teacher expectations, (8) problems associated at every level, (9) implications for schools, and (10) references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Friends First, P.O. Box 270302, Littleton, CO 80127, Telephone: (800) 909-WAIT Secondary Telephone: (720) 981-9193 Fax: 720-981-9104 E-mail: info@friendsfirst.org Web Site: http://www.friendsfirst.org

Keywords: AIDS, Communities, Federal programs, HIV, Legislation, Prevention, Public schools, Schools, Sexuality education, State programs, Teachers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.