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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (41 total).

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2019. Implicit bias resource guide: A resource to increase health equity and address implicit bias. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 15 pp.

Annotation: This resource lists seven steps to minimize implicit bias, answers questions about recognizing and addressing implicit bias, and gives stories shared with NICHQ about the ways bias has affected individuals.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Beliefs, Health care, Minority groups

Golden J. 2018. Babies made us modern: How infants brought America into the twentieth century. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press,

Annotation: This book examines how babies shaped American society and culture and led their families into the modern world to become more accepting of scientific medicine, active consumers, open to new theories of human psychological development, and welcoming of government advice and programs. The book also examines the influence of cultural traditions and religious practices upon the diversity of infant lives, exploring the ways class, race, region, gender, and community shaped life in the nursery and household.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/

Keywords: Community role, Cultural beliefs, Infants, Regional factors, Religion, Social change, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

Harris JL, Haraghey KS, Choi Y-Y, Fleming-Milici F. 2017. Parents' attitudes about food marketing to children: 2012 to 2015–Opportunities and challenges to creating demand for a healthier food environment. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of a survey of parents with children and adolescents ages 2 to 17 to measure parents' attitudes about food marketing and other influences on children's eating habits and their support for policies to promote healthy eating for their children. Topics include parents' opinions about food industry self-regulation, including the ages of children who should be protected from unhealthy food marketing and whether they believe that individual food companies have delivered on their pledges to limit food advertising to children. The report also examines parents' willingness to participate in a variety of actions to encourage companies to reduce unhealthy food marketing to their children. A series of infographics is also available.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Beliefs, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Consumer surveys, Food consumption, Marketing, Nutrition, Parent participation, Parenting attitudes, Policy development

Office of the U.S. Surgeon General, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health. 2017. Know the Risks: E-cigarettes & young people. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about the risks electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use poses to youth and young adults, as well as resources for expanding and sharing knowledge about e-cigarettes and their impact on young people. Contents include the Surgeon General's report on the use of e-cigarettes by youth and young adults and information about the role of parents, health care professionals, and others in preventing harm and reducing young people's exposure to e-cigarettes. Resources include a fact sheet focusing on trends and heath risks, a quiz, a parent tip sheet, a health care provider conversation card, and responses to frequently asked questions. The fact sheet, tip sheet, and conversation card are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adverse effects, Beliefs, Communication, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Federal initiatives, Marketing, Public awareness campaign materials, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco, Trends, Young adults

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

National Children's Oral Health Foundation. 2016. #MySmileMatters national youth engagement plan. Charlotte, NC: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model for helping adolescents and adults integrate oral health advocacy, learning, and teaching opportunities into their schools and communities. Contents include activities to increase oral health literacy by changing beliefs, activities to change oral health habits by changing behavior, and activities to affect whole populations by changing the environment. The plan also outlines steps for adolescents and youth groups to become members of the #MySmileMatters Youth Movement, a national initiative to engage adolescents in oral health and wellness.

Contact: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 4108 Park Road, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28209, Telephone: (704) 350-1600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 559-9838 Fax: (704) 350-1333 E-mail: info@ncohf.org Web Site: http://www.ncohf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Behavior change, Beliefs, Community action, Community participation, Health behavior, Learning, Models, National initiatives, Oral health, Policy development, Schools, Strategic plans, Teaching, Youth

Lindland E, Fond M, Haydon A, Volmert A, Kendall-Taylor N. 2016. Just do it: Communicating implementation science and practice. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report provides strategic communications recommendations designed to help people understand that supporting successful implementation is critical to improving outcomes for children, families, and communities. Topics include the central features of implementation science and practice that experts want to be able to communicate; how individuals who work in various fields related to evidence, implementation, and social programs and policy think about implementation science; how the general public thinks about issues related to implementation; why communicating about implementation is difficult; and what implementation science can do to address gaps in understanding and encourage more effective communication, uptake, and application of knowledge and perspective on implementation.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Beliefs, Communication, Diffusion of innovation, Planning, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research, Service delivery, Thinking

MacKay JM, Steel A, Dykstra H, Wheeler T, Samuel E, Green A. 2016. Keeping kids safe in and around water: Exploring misconceptions that lead to drowning . Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report examines current patterns, circumstances, beliefs, and behaviors leading to childhood drowning. Topics include drownings in and around the home, pool drownings, and natural water drownings; preventing drowning in childhood through supervision, swim lessons and water survival skills, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation; pool safety tips for parents; and water recreation public policy. A fact sheet about children and the danger of drowning with information about the problem, parents' misconceptions, water survival skills, and water safety tips is included. Detailed profiles for drownings in and around the home, in pools, and in natural water are availale in the accompanying report, Dangerous Waters: Profiles of Fatal Childhood Drownings in the U.S. 2005–2014.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Child safety, Children, Competence, Drowning, Injury prevention, Life skills, Parenting, Policy development, Public policy, Risk taking, Statistical data, Water safety

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2015, 2013. Tips to help faith leaders and their communities address teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 20 pp.

Annotation: This publication is designed to help religious and secular leaders engage adolescents in conversations about sex and adolescent pregnancy within the context of their religious beliefs. Contents include nine tips to help faith leaders and their communities address adolescent pregnancy. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Prevention, Religious beliefs, Sexual behavior, Spanish language materials, Spirituality

Bedard Holland S. 2013. Motivational interviewing. Glen Allen, VA: Virginia Oral Health Coalition, 1 v.

Annotation: This presentation describes techniques to communicate the importance of prevention and good oral health. Contents include a description of motivational interviewing including what it is, when it can be used, and reasons to use it. Topics include stages of change and why they are important, developing a relationship and understanding client frame of reference, presenting new information and positive action steps. Other topics include presenting a menu of options, determining action steps and making a plan, discussing potential challenges and solutions, and providing ongoing support. Cultural competence, beliefs that may impact oral health, and strategies for overcoming resistance are also addressed

Contact: Virginia Health Catalyst, 4200 Innslake Drive, Suite 103, Glen Allen, VA 23060, Telephone: (804) 269-8720 E-mail: info@vahealthcatalyst.org Web Site: https://vahealthcatalyst.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Beliefs, Communication skills, Cultural competence, Disease prevention, Health behavior, Interviews, Methods, Motivation, Oral health

Delta Dental of Colorado. 2013. Oral health myths and realities. Denver, CO: Delta Dental of Colorado, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents facts about oral health within the context of commonly held beliefs. Topics include the relationship between oral health and raw foods, carbonated soft drinks, tobacco use, genetics, dental visits, and pregnancy.

Contact: Delta Dental of Colorado, 4582 South Ulster Street, Suite 800, Denver, CO 80237, Telephone: (800) 233-0860 E-mail: customer_service@ddpco.com Web Site: http://www.deltadentalco.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Consumer education materials, Misinformation, Oral health

National Library of Medicine. 2012. Native voices: Native people's concepts of health and illness. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, 1 v.

Annotation: This mobile application captures the contents of a National of Library Medicine exhibition. The app lets users explore video interviews with tribal elders, healers, and others who practice traditional medicine, Western medicine, or a combination of both. The content relates to five major themes: individual, community, tradition, healing, and nature. Interviews can be searched by keyword, interviewee name, or topic. Other videos provide an exhibition overview and highlights of the 4,400-mile journey of a totem pole specially crafted for the exhibition, from Washington state to Maryland.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Hawaiians, Health education, Minority health, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Public health, Traditional medicine

Urban Indian Health Institute, Native Generations. 2012. A Native way that's ours. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, Native Generations, 1 video (11 min., 17 sec.).

Annotation: This video discusses the many risks faced by Native Americans in obtaining health care and other culturally specific services for those located in urban areas away from tribal connections. Topics include health, learning about Native culture and history for the next generation, and pregnancy support and advice for mothers and fathers,

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Cultural beliefs, Cultural sensitivity, Family support services, Multimedia

Kouame G. 2011. The coming of the blessing: Prenatal education, training and resources. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes,

Annotation: This web site hosts an initiative for American Indian and Alaska Native families providing prenatal education, training and resources to encourage women to include traditional beliefs, lessons from their ancestors, and their partners in their circle of support during pregnancy. Site navigation points include awards and recognition, storytelling, publications, resources, a prematurity prevention resource center, and information on CenteringPregnancy contacts from tribal partners.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Consumer education materials, Cultural beliefs, Family support services, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Social support

Early Head Start National Resource Center. [2010]. Revisiting and updating the multicultural principles for Head Start programs serving children ages birth to five: Addressing culture and home language in Head Start programs and services. [Washington, DC]: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 80 pp.

Annotation: This document provides multicultural principles for Head Start programs and reviews research on multicultural principles. Contents are presented as 10 principles: individuals and culture, culturally relevant Head Start programming, learning about cultures of different groups and discarding stereotypes, cultural relevance and curriculum choices/adaptation, identity and functioning in society, English- and non-English-language learning, staff who reflect and are responsive to communities and families served, multicultural programming for children that respects differences, examining and challenging institutional and personal biases, and incorporating cultural and diverse programs in all systems and services.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural beliefs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Head Start, Oral health, Program development

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2010. Communicating effectively about vaccines: New communication resources for health officials. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 28 pp.

Annotation: This document presents results of a study to identify better ways to communicate with parents, policy makers, media, and the public about the benefits and safety of vaccines. The study was aimed at vaccine-hesitant parents and core influencers of these parents. The document discusses how to understand the target audiences, key messages, and creative advertising concepts. The messages were developed using surveys and focus groups with the target audiences.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Communication, Immunization, National surveys, Parenting attitudes, Public opinion, Trust

Marquardt E, Glenn ND, Clark K. 2010. My daddy's name is donor: A new study of young adults conceived through sperm donation. New York, NY: Institute for American Values, 135 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the results of a survey of adults between the ages of 18 and 45 whose mother used a sperm donor to conceive them. It examines young adult attitudes, well-being, and concerns about themselves, their families, their unknown fathers, and reproductive technologies in general. The report also discusses the current status of assisted reproductive technology, the problem of secrets, the child's right to know, religion and race, and ethical issues and makes recommendations.

Contact: Institute for American Values, 1841 Broadway, Suite 211, New York, NY 10023, Telephone: (212) 246-3942 E-mail: info@americanvalues.org Web Site: http://www.americanvalues.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Beliefs, Mental health, Reproductive technologies, Surveys, Young adults

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2010. Communicating effectively about vaccines: Summary of a survey of U.S. parents and guardians. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document for state and territorial health officials summarizes results from a survey of U.S. parents and guardians to gather information about reasons for delaying or refusing vaccines. Contents include demographic, geographic and attitudinal profiles of respondents; reasons for opposing or supporting vaccinations; ratings of messages about vaccinations; sources of influence; and discussion and conclusion.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Communication, Immunization, National surveys, Parenting attitudes, Public opinion, Trust

Card JJ, Benner T. 2008. Model programs for adolescent sexual health: Evidence-based HIV, STI, and pregnancy prevention interventions. New York, NY: Springer, 394 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a directory of effective sexual education programs in the United States, all of which are aimed at a variety of age groups, and ethnic, cultural, and sexual orientations. Each program description contains the following: an abstract, program rationale and history, schedule, materials, a description of implementation steps, and an evaluation section. Sites of the programs include schools, community settings, and medical clinics.

Contact: Springer Publishing Company, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036, Telephone: (877) 687-7476 E-mail: contactus@springerpub.com Web Site: http://www.springerpub.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-082613824-8.

Keywords: Sexuality education, Adolescents, Cultural beliefs, Ethnic groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases

Management Sciences for Health, U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care. 2008. The provider's guide to quality and culture. [Medford, MA]: Management Sciences for Health, 1 v.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help health care organizations throughout the United States provide high-quality, culturally competent services to multi-ethnic populations. Resources include a quiz to help individuals learn how culture influences health care, materials that provide background information and a framework for thinking about cultural competence, and short audio clips of health professionals describing their experience working with culturally diverse populations. Additional information and resources about client-provider interaction, health disparities, cultural groups, and culturally competent organizations are available on the website.

Contact: The Manager's Electronic Resource Center, Management Sciences for Health, E-mail: erc@mch.org Web Site: http://erc.msh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Organizations, Physician patient relations, Self assessment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.