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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (95 total).

Harris JL, Fleming-Milici F, Frazier W, Haraghey K, Kalnova S, Romo-Palafox M, Seymour N, Rodriguez-Arauz, Schwartz MB. 2017. Nutrition and marketing of baby and toddler food and drinks. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 112 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the nutritional quality and other characteristics of food and drink products marketed to parents for their infants and toddlers (up to age 3). It also examines the messages used to promote these products, and evaluates how well they correspond to expert advice about feeding young children.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Consumer education, Evaluation, Feeding, Feeding, Food, Infants, Marketing, Toddlers

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

First Things First. 2016–. Arizona parent kit. Phoenix, AZ: First Things First, multiple items.

Annotation: This kit is designed to help parents meet the challenges of parenting and support the healthy development of their infant or young child. Contents include resources about child development, health and safety, quality child care, and school readiness. Information about the importance of oral health in young children, preventing and treating tooth decay, oral hygiene during pregnancy and infancy, and finding a dentist is included.

Contact: First Things First, 4000 North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, AZ 85012, Telephone: (602) 771-5100 Secondary Telephone: (877) 803-7234 E-mail: community@firstthingsfirst.org Web Site: http://www.firstthingsfirst.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Child care, Child development, Child health, Child safety, Childbirth, Consumer education materials, Dental care, Dental caries, Health care utilization, Infant health, Infants, Oral hygiene, Parenting, Pregnancy, Preventive health services, State initiatives, Toddlers, Young children

Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Program. 2016. Oregon oral health surveillance system 2002–2015. Portland, OR: Oregon Health Authority, Center for Prevention and Health Promotion, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document provides data on key indicators of oral health in Oregon for the period 2002 through 2015. Contents include a description of each indicator and the source and frequency of data available by year. Topics include preventive oral health services for pregnant women, toddlers, children, adolescents, and adults. Data on work force, Medicaid, cancer, cleft lip/palate, and water fluoridation are included.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, Oral Health Program, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 850, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-0348 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-0240 E-mail: oral.health@state.or.us Web Site: https://public.health.oregon.gov/PreventionWellness/oralhealth/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Data sources, Dental care, Medicaid, Oral health, Oregon, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Special health care needs, State surveys, Statistical data, Toddlers, Work force

Schmit S, Walker C. 2016. Disparate access: Head Start and CCDBG data by race and ethnicity. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights state-level data by race and ethnicity about differential access to Head Start preschool, Early Head Start, and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG)-funded child care. Contents include background on eligibility and funding of Head Start and CCDBG, racial and ethnic diversity of young children, and young children in poverty; data on the percentage of eligible children served by program, race/ethnicity, and state; and potential policy implications and data gaps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child care, Child development, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Ethnic groups, Federal programs, Head Start, Infants, Low income groups, Service delivery, Statistics, Toddlers, Young children

Zero To Three, Military Families Projects. 2015-. Babies on the homefront. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides military and veteran parents ideas for enhancing everyday moments with their infant or toddler. Contents include behavior tips, ideas for creating activities, and information and ideas on self-care. Parents can personalize the app with their infant’s picture and create a photo gallery of their child’s moods. Parents can sort the information by their young child’s age and specify their situation as At Home, Leaving Soon, Deployed, Home Again, a Veteran, or visiting a hospital. The app also allows access to a series of videos on parenting for military and veteran families. The resource is available in English and Spanish. A handout to share with parents and professionals is also available.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Military, Mobile applications, Parents, Spanish language materials, Toddlers

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

Advocacy and Communication Solutions with ZERO TO THREE. 2015. Infant and toddler messaging guide. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for educators, advocates, and policymakers examines national trends in messaging about infants and toddlers from birth to age 3 and offers guidance on how to develop effective messages. Contents include examples of outcome-based and program or service messages used by early childhood organizations and agencies across the country to describe a range of infant and toddler issues, as well as suggestions for how to improve those messages. Basic rules for creating messages that resonate with a broad audience, resources to help frame messages, a message creation checklist, and answers to common messaging questions are also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Communication, Infants, Policy development, Toddlers

Monahan S, Thomas J, Paulsell D, Murphy L . 2015. Learning about infant and toddler early education services (LITES): A systematic review of the evidence. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 48 pp. plus appendices

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a systematic review to identify effective and replicable program models to support infant and toddler early learning in out-of-home early care and education (ECE) settings. Contenst include the purpose and scope of the review, methods, review results, and suggestions for future research. Appendices include direct multicomponent program model summaries, direct and indirect enhancement model summaries, screening disposition tables, citation of studies, and a glossary.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Early childhood education, Infants, Learning, Model programs, Research, Screening, Toddlers

Allen L, Kelly BB, ed; Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success. 2015. Transforming the workforce for children birth to age 8: A unifying foundation. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; National Research Council, 706 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. It also examines the current capacities and practices of the work force, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government agencies and other funders who support and oversee these systems. Contents include recommendations to improve the quality of professional practice and the practice environment for care and education professionals. These detailed recommendations create a blueprint for action that builds on a unifying foundation of child development and early learning, shared knowledge and competencies for care and education professionals, and principles for effective professional learning.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-32485-4 .

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Child development, Competence, Competency based education, Early childhood education, Financing, Infants, Learning, Paraprofessional personnel, Program development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research, Teachers, Toddlers, Training, Work force, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2014. Caring for infants and toddlers in early care and education. Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, 131 pp., checklist (12 pp.).

Annotation: This document comprises 232 nationally recognized health and safety standards applicable to the infant and toddler population in early care and education settings. The materials and appendices are a subset of materials in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards–Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs (3rd ed.). Topics include enrollment and admission; staffing, consultants, and supervision; environment and equipment; program activities for healthy development; healthy weight promotion; and safe and healthy practices and procedures. A compliance and comparison checklist is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood education, Infant health, Safety, Standards, Toddlers

Korfmacher J. 2014. Infant, toddler, and early childhood mental health competencies: A comparison of systems. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a review of early childhood mental health competency systems. The report reviews what is meant by infant, toddler, and early childhood mental health competencies and issues of nomenclature; provides an overview of six competency systems (California, Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Ohio, and Vermont); presents results of a comparative analysis, summarizing areas of agreement and disagreement; and discusses the relevance of the competency systems to the early childhood mental health movement.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Collaboration, Competence, Competency based education, Infants, Interdisciplinary approach, Mental health services, Policy development, Systems development, Toddlers, Young children

James Madison University Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services. 2013. Health Bites. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help families learn about good nutrition, physical activity, and other lifestyle choices. Topics include breastfeeding; weaning; oral health care for infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children; feeding younger infants, older infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children; junk food, snacks, and eating out; and picky eaters. Additional topics include oral health and nutrition during pregnancy, portion sizes, cooking, shopping, gardening, family mealtime, healthy weight, and weight loss. Contents include videos and games, as well as information on nutrition education credit for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants.

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, P.O. Box 2448, Richmond, VA 23218, Telephone: (804) 864-7000 E-mail: questions@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.state.va.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Consumer education materials, Continuing education, Dental care, Dental hygiene, Feeding, Health behavior, Infants, Nutrition, Oral health, Physical activity, Pregnant women, Toddlers

Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Dental Prevention and Clinical Support Center. 2013. Early childhood caries (ECC) educational materials. Phoenix, AZ: Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, 4 items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help health professionals raise awareness among American Indian parents about ways they can prevent oral disease and promote oral health in infants and toddlers from birth to ages 16 months. Contents include a flyer, a brochure, and two posters. Topics include tooth decay, oral hygiene, nutrition, and the first dental visit.

Contact: Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, 2214 North Central Avenue, Suite 100, Phoenix, AZ 85004, Telephone: (602) 258-4822 Fax: (602) 258-4825 E-mail: info@itcaonline.com Web Site: http://itcaonline.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Arizona, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Infants, Local initiatives, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Toddlers

Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, Maryland Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics. 2013. Bringing the early signs of autism spectrum disorders into focus. Baltimore, MD: Kennedy Krieger Institute, 1 video (9 min., 3 sec.).

Annotation: This nine-minute tutorial consists of six video clips comparing toddlers who show no signs of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to toddlers who show early signs of ASD. Each video is presented with a voice-over explaining how the specific behaviors exhibited by the child, as they occur on screen, are either suggestive of ASD or typical child development. Although developed as a resource for Maryland’s pediatricians, the tutorial is also available to parents and other professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Kennedy Krieger Institute, 707 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (443) 923-9200 Secondary Telephone: (443) 923-2645 Fax: (410) 550-9344 E-mail: webmaster@kennedykrieger.org Web Site: http://www.kennedykrieger.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Parent education, Resources for professionals, Toddlers, Videorecordings, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2012. Preventing childhood obesity in early care and education programs: Selected standards from Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd edition (2nd ed.). Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, 77 pp.

Annotation: This set of national standards describe evidence-based best practices in nutrition, physical activity, and screen time for early care and education programs. Contents include intervention strategies to prevent excessive weight gain in young children. The standards detail opportunities for facilities to work with families. Topics include nutrition requirements for infants, toddlers and preschoolers, and school-age children; meal service and supervision; food brought from home; nutrition education; food and nutrition service policies and plans; infant feeding policy; active opportunities for physical activity; playing outdoors; protection from air pollution while children are outside; caregivers/teachers' encouragement of physical activity; policies and practices that promote physical activity; and limiting media and computer time. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org $30 plus shipping and handling; available from the website at no charge. Document Number: ISBN 978-58110-714-2.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood education, Infants, National initiatives, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy development, Preschool children, Primary prevention, Program development, School-age children, Standards, Toddlers

Zero To Three. 2012. What's in the budget for babies?: Analysis of the President's 2013 budget proposal. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This analysis examines the federal 2013 budget from the perspective of support for the healthy development of infants and toddlers. It discusses programs that support children's health and nutrition, programs that focus on strong family support, and positive early learning experiences. A comparison of federal program funding describes dollar-for-dollar differences in current and projected funding for nutrition, child welfare, education, justice programs, health and mental health programs, and family support programs.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Budgets, Child development, Child health programs, Cost effectiveness, Federal programs, Funding, Infants, Toddlers, Young children

Zero to Three. 2012. National baby facts: Infants, toddlers, and their families in the United States. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents and parenting professionals provides facts and information on children and families in the United States. It describes many of the issues that babies around the country are facing and illustrates what it takes to raise a healthy child in a safe and nurturing environment. Included are facts and statistics on support and services related to health care, food and nutrition, housing security, and early learning opportunities. Statistics on infants, toddlers, and children by family income, race and ethnicity are included. The web site also provides state-by-state data.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Families, Infant health, Statistics, Toddlers

National Infant and Toddler Child Care Initiative, Early Head Start National Resource Center at Zero to Three. [2011]. Developing a statewide network of infant and toddler specialists: Technical assistance manual for states and territories. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 36 pp.

Annotation: This manual focuses on developing statewide networks of infant/toddler specialists (ITSNs) who can work directly with the childcare workforce to increase their skills and knowledge. The manual explores the issues that have contributed to the interest in statewide infant/toddler specialist networks; provides a framework for a step-by-step approach to create a network; emphasizes the importance of linking the network to other programs, quality initiatives, and consultant networks; and provides examples and resources for states that are developing, implementing, and evaluating an ITSN. The appendices include examples from state programs in Ohio, North Carolina, and New Jersey, along with a sample ITSN action plan.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Infants, Manuals, Program development, Provider networks, State programs, Technical assistance, Toddlers

Danaher J, Goode S, Lazara A. 2011. Part C updates. (12th ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, annual.

Annotation: This publication provides a compilation of resources on the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Section I contains information on Part C program administration, funding appropriations, and trend data related to the numbers of children served, the settings in which children receive services and the status of children exiting Part C. Section II contains information on Part C program implementation, including: states' Part C rules, regulations and policies; OSEP policy letters related to Part C; state requirements for Part C providers; state practices related to early identification of very young children with autism; promising practices for promoting the social-emotional well-being of infants and toddlers receiving early intervention services; and state efforts to meet the early childhood transition requirements of IDEA. Section III includes federal and state level Part C program contact information. Previous Editions of the Part C Updates are available from the website.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Contact E-mail: nectasta.nectas@mhs.unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C, Infants with special health care needs, Program evaluation, Program management, State programs, Toddlers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.