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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Children with Special Health Care Needs: Child Care Bibliography

Children with Special Health Care Needs: Child Care

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 16 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on child care and special needs children including materials for parents and professionals.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 16 records.

American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2013–. Caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for early care and education programs (3rd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; Washington, DC: American Public Health Association; Denver, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, 579 pp.

Annotation: This set of national health and safety standards provides information about high-quality health and safety practices and policies for early care and education settings. Topics include staffing; program activities for healthy development; health promotion and protection; nutrition and food service; facilities, supplies, equipment, and environmental health; play areas, playgrounds, and transportation; infectious diseases; children with special health care needs and disabilities; policies; and licensing and community action. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org $55 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58110-438-7 (American Academy of Pediatrics).

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child care centers, Child development centers, Child health, Child safety, Children, Early childhood development, Health promotion, Infant health, Infants, Model programs, Standards, Young children

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care. 2013. Stepping stones to caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards–Guidelines for early care and education programs: Protecting children from harm (3rd ed.). Denver, CO: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This booklet contains 138 standards to advance the quality and safety of early care and education environments. It is a companion to Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards -- Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd edition (CFOC3). The booklet comprises a subset of the standards contained in CFO3, including new and updated standards on safe sleep, handling and feeding of human milk, introducing solid foods to infants, monitoring children's development, unimmunized children, preventing expulsions, and availability of drinking water. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children with special health care needs, Facilities, Health promotion, Learning activities, Management, Nutrition, Out of home care, Personnel, Safety, Spanish language materials, Standards

Child Care Aware. 2011. Choosing high-quality child care for a child with special needs. Arlington, VA: National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, Child Care Aware, 2 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet explains the importance of choosing high quality child care for children with special health needs and offers tips to help parents. It provides guidelines on locating and selecting quality programs; lists questions that parents should ask when interviewing directors and child care providers; and describes key indicators of high quality care that parents should look for when observing and listening. Also included is a tear-off checklist of things that parents should look for and ask about during the process of identifying a quality program for a child with special health needs.

Contact: National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, 1515 North Courthouse Road, 11th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (703) 341-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2246 Fax: (703) 341-4101 E-mail: info@naccrra.net Web Site: http://www.naccrra.net Single copies available from the website, $18.50 for pack of 50.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children with special health care needs, Guidelines, Parents, Program evaluation

National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center. 2011. Initiatives regarding inclusion of children with special needs in child care. Fairfax, VA: National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center,

Annotation: This web page provides information about the needs of children with special health care needs in child care and discusses efforts states have made to support inclusion and improve the quality of child care for this population. The page lists examples of federal agencies and federally funded projects and national organizations, state initiatives, and resources that support inclusion; a brief description of each is provided, along with a link and contact information. A table is also included that lists types of inclusive child care activities and indicates which states support each one.

Contact: National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center, 10530 Rosehaven Street, Suite 400, Fairfax, VA 22030, Telephone: (800) 616-2242 Fax: (800) 716-2242 E-mail: info@nccic.org Web Site: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care services, Children with special health care needs, Federal programs, Inclusive schools, Initiatives, State programs

Washington State Department of Health, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program. [2010]. My child's map. Tacoma, WA: PAVE, 10 pp.

Annotation: The tool serves as a quick reference guide for families just receiving a new diagnosis of autism for their child. It provides a template to help parents know who to contact and how to start getting help for their child. Topics include health insurance and medical care, early intervention, education, specialized services, child care, family support, parent education, therapies, and medications. Many national resources are included as well as resources for Washington state. The tool is available in Cambodian, English, Korean, and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: PAVE, 6316 South 12th Street, Tacoma, WA 98465, Telephone: (253) 565-2266 Secondary Telephone: ( 800) 572-7368 Fax: (253) 566-8052 E-mail: pave@wapave.org Web Site: http://www.washingtonpave.com Available from the website. Document Number: DOH Pub. no. 970-138.

Keywords: Asian English language materials, Autism, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Community coordination, Parenting, Spanish language materials, State programs, Washington

Boylan E, Goldman D. 2010. Including children with disabilities in state pre-K programs. Newark, NJ: Education Law Center, 21 pp. (Pre-K policy brief series)

Annotation: This policy brief provides an overview of the federal law that requires school districts to educate preschool children with disabilities alongside preschool children who do not have disabilities if they are enrolled in typical early childhood programs. It describes the provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and sets forth a list of policy recommendations designed to help ensure that children with disabilities receive an appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. It also provides state-specific information on programs and regulations and the numbers of preschool children served under IDEA. The brief is intended to serve as a resource for policy makers and advocates seeking to increase inclusion in state funded pre-k programs.

Contact: Education Law Center, 60 Park Place, Suite 300, Newark, NJ 07102, Telephone: (973) 624-1815 Secondary Telephone: (973) 624-4618 Fax: (973) 624-7339 E-mail: elc@edlawcenter.org Web Site: http://www.edlawcenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Early childhood education, Federal legislation, Inclusive schools, Public education, State programs, Young children

Cate D, Diefendorf M, McCullough K, Peters M, Whaley K. 2010. Quality indicators of inclusive childhood programs/practices: A compilation of selected resources. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, 32 pp.

Annotation: This paper is a compilation of select resources and indicators of high quality inclusive childhood programs and practices that serve the needs and priorities of infants and young children with disabilities and their families. There are five main sections within the compilation: (1) Quality Inclusion Practice Considerations, which provide general strategies to enhance the quality of inclusion experiences for children and families; (2) Classroom Observation Rating Tools, which allow the user to assess and rate quality practices within settings.; (3) Individual Child Focused Considerations, which provide an inventory of quality indicators; (4) Collaborative Inclusion Practices, which provide several examples of self assessment tools for the appraisal of collaboration within a community; and (5) Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), which provide information on systems that are designed to rate the quality of child care settings and includes standards related to the inclusion of children with special needs. The paper discusses what is meant by inclusion, and describes how to use the compilation.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Disabilities, Early childhood education, Families, Health care systems, Inclusion, Infants with special health care needs, Measures, Program improvement

Donoghue EA, Kraft CA, eds. 2010. Managing chronic health needs in child care and schools: A quick reference guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 214 pp.

Annotation: This book is designed to serve as a quick reference that addresses a variety of common chronic health problems that children face. The first half of the book provides background on the services and systems that support the care of children with chronic medical conditions and special health care needs, discusses the treatment team, reviews different types of care plans and methods for implementing a care plan, and addresses new conditions and signs of concern. The second half of the book consists of condition-specific quick-reference sheets.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $45.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-299-4.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special heath care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health care, Health care systems, Health services, Treatment

California Department of Education, Children's Development Division. 2009. Inclusion works!: Creating child care programs that promote belonging for children with special needs. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, 85 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this handbook is to help child care providers learn strategies that promote inclusion of and a sense of belonging for all children. Topics include (1) including children with disabilities or other special needs, (2) comparing inclusive child care and quality child care, (3) creating inclusive child care settings, (4) identifying and finding help, and (5) collaborating for inclusion.

Contact: California Department of Education, 1430 N Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (916) 319-0800 Secondary Telephone: (916) 445-4556 Web Site: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ 19.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8011-1689-6.

Keywords: Child care, Child care services, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Inclusion, Young children

Child Care Law Center. 2009. Questions and answers about the Americans with Disabilities Act: A quick reference for child care providers (Upd. ed.). San Francisco, CA: Child Care Law Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This quick reference describes the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- including those in the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 -- that are relevant to child care providers and programs. It defines what the ADA is and explains who is protected by it; whether or not specific child care programs are required to achieve compliance; and the types of child care policies, procedures, and accommodations the ADA requires. It is available in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

Contact: Child Care Law Center, 221 Pine Street, Third Floor, San Francisco, CA 94104, Telephone: (415) 394-7144 Fax: (415) 394-7140 E-mail: info@childcarelaw.org Web Site: http://www.childcarelaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Asian language materials, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Federal legislation, Inclusion, Spanish language materials

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2009. Healthy kids, healthy care: Parents as partners in promoting healthy and safe child care. Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education,

Annotation: This website for parents of children who attend child care programs contains current, expert information and resources about health and safety issues for young children. Content is presented within the following categories: caregiver; cleanliness; emotional health; healthy habits, illness, chronic conditions, and special needs; and safety. The web site is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child safety, Consumer education materials, Information sources, Parents, Spanish language materials, Web sites, Young children

Sweet M. 2008. A thinking guide to inclusive childcare for those who care about young children with and without disabilities. Madison, WI: Disability Rights Wisconsin, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers ideas and strategies to support staff in developing childcare practices that consider the needs of individual children and promote an inclusive experience for the families of children in childcare. Contents include inviting parents to talk, getting to know a child, understanding behavior, helping children learn, inclusion and finding many ways to participate, children with developmental disabilities, talking about children to their parents, and staff issues. The document provides additional information on Children and the Americans with Disabilities Act and conversation pages to use with parents and children

Contact: Disability Rights Wisconsin, 131 West Wilson Street, Suite 700, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (800) 928-8778 Secondary Telephone: (888) 758-6049 Fax: (608) 267-0368 Web Site: http://www.disabilityrightswi.org $7.00; also available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child care, Developmental disabilities, Child behavior, Child care services, Inclusion, Children with special health care needs

Wisconsin Child Care Information Center. [2007]. Think big, start small: Together - children grow—Quality child care for children with special needs. [Madison, WI]: Wisconsin Child Care Information Center, 28 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers information about providing high-quality child care for children with special health care needs. Information is included about parents' and providers' concerns, what parents and providers need to know to get started, suggestions for talking to parents and providers, how to get child care off to a good start, strategies for success, resources, and what to do when a child care provider refuses to care for a child with a disability. Questions and answers about topics including the American with Disabilities Act are presented.

Contact: Wisconsin Child Care Information Center, Department of Public Instruction, PO Box 7841, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 224-5388 Secondary Telephone: (800) 362-7353 E-mail: ccic@dpi.state.wi.us Web Site: http://ccic.dcf.wi.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Disabilities, Legislation, Parents

Schulman K, Blank H. 2007. Close to home: State strategies to strengthen and support family, friend, and neighbor care. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses some policy decisions that states make or could make to support family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care of children whose parents are working. Such policy decisions include (1) determining which providers are exempt from state licensing or regulation, (2) setting standards for FFN providers receiving public funds, (3) establishing policies for child care assistance programs that help parents pay for FFN care, including provider reimbursement rates and parent co-payments; (4) supporting initiatives to improve the quality of child care, including FFN care, (5) allowing FFN providers to participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program, (6) facilitating coordination of state prekindergarten initiatives with FFN care, (7) assisting FFN providers caring for children with disabilities and other special needs, (8) making home visiting and family support programs available to FFN providers, and (9) permitting unionization of FFN providers. The report discusses the policy options states have in each of the areas, how these policies can affect families using FFN care as well as FFN providers, and examples of promising approaches states have taken.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children with special health care needs, Families, Family support programs, Financing, Home visiting, Licensing, Low income groups, Public policy, State programs, Working parents

Lombardi J, Bogle MM, eds. 2005. Beacon of hope: The promise of Early Head Start for America's youngest children. Washington, DC: Zero to Three Press, 224 pp.

Annotation: This book describes the Early Head Start Program -- how it came into being and what it offers young children and families. The book provides an overview of the program and discusses (1) how to improve the odds for infants and toddlers from families with low incomes, (2) the program's role in promoting good-quality child care for low-income families, (3) services for pregnant women, (4) nurturing early learning, (5) fathers, (6) adolescent parents, (7) infant mental health, (8) infants and toddlers with disabilities, and (9) Early Head Start and state partnerships. Each chapter includes references. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. The book includes one appendix: members of the advisory committee on services for families with infants and toddlers.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0943657652.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Infants, Infants with special health care needs, Low income groups, Mental health, Pregnant women, Young children

Krajicek MJ, Hertzberg DL, Sandall SR, Anastasiow N, eds. 2004. First Start program: Handbook for the care of infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities and chronic conditions. (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed, 491 pp.

Annotation: This handbook assists parents, families, and early childhood personnel working with children with disabilities and chronic health conditions to recognize the child first before the disability or condition. The goals of the handbook are to (1) care for young children with disabilities and chronic conditions and meet their special needs in child care and other out-of-home settings; (2) share information with health and education professionals and build partnerships in meeting the needs of children with disabilities and chronic conditions and their families; and (3) promote quality care in inclusive child care and preschool settings for young children with disabilities and chronic conditions. Section topics include early learning, social, emotional, speech, and language development; an outline of common chronic and disabling conditions; care needs including assistive devices, behavior support, infection control, oral health, and other needs; and communication and community support. The book also contains a supplemental section on invasive procedures and care, and a glossary. Extensive figures and tables provide statistical and other information throughout the book.

Contact: Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, TX 78757-6897, Telephone: (512) 451-3246 Secondary Telephone: (800) 897-3202 Fax: 512-451-8542 E-mail: q@proedinc.com Web Site: http://www.proedinc.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89079-922-9.

Keywords: Child care, Child care workers, Children, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disabilities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, Infants, Preschool children, Toddlers, Young children

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.