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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Haworth SM, Griffen AK. 2016. Including people with disabilities: Public health workforce competencies. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health professionals outlines knowledge and practice skills for including people with disabilities in the core public health functions (assessment, policy development, and assurance). Contents include strategies to meet the competencies and examples of how people with disabilities can be successfully included in public health activities. Topics include disability models across the lifespan, methods used to assess health issues for people with disabilities, how public health programs impact health outcomes for people with disabilities, and implementing and evaluating strategies to include people with disabilities in public health programs. The appendices contain a glossary of terms, resources by topic, academic resources, resources for embedding the competencies into a public health curriculum or training, and information about alignment with other public health competencies and standards.

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Contact E-mail: disabilityinPH@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Competence, Disabilities, Inclusion, Learning, Policy development, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Work force

Wyatt R, Laderman M, Botwinick L, Mate K, Whittington J. 2016. Achieving health equity: A guide for health care organizations. Cambridge, MA: Institute for Healthcare Improvement , 45 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a framework for health care organizations to improve health equity in the communities they serve. Topics include making health equity a strategic priority, developing structure and processes to support health equity work, deploying specific strategies to address the multiple determinants of health on which health care organizations can have a direct impact, decreasing institutional racism within the organization, and developing partnerships with community organizations to improve health and equity. The paper also describes practical issues in measuring health equity, presents a case study of the Henry Ford Health System, and includes a self-assessment tool for health care organizations to assess their current state related to each component of the framework.

Contact: Institute for Healthcare Improvement , 20 University Road, Seventh Floor , Cambridge , MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 301-4800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0831 Fax: (617) 301-4830 E-mail: info@ihi.org Web Site: http://www.ihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Discrimination, Equal opportunities, Health care delivery, Health disparities, Health systems agencies, Inclusion, Measures, Organizational change, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Self evaluation, Social bias

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education. 2015. Policy statement on inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 43 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement sets a vision and provides recommendations to states, local educational agencies, schools, and public and private early childhood programs for increasing the inclusion of infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities in high-quality early childhood programs. Contents include information about the scientific base for the benefits of inclusion, the legal foundation for inclusion, challenges to inclusion in early childhood programs, partnering to build a nationwide culture of inclusion, and recommendations for state action.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Federal initiatives, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Infants, Learning, Legal responsibility, Policy development, Program development, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Schools, Young children

PolicyLink and University of Southern California, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity. 2014–. National equity atlas. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool provides data on demographic changes and racial and economic inclusion for the largest 150 regions, in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the United States as a whole. Contents include data summaries that provide a snapshot of how a community is doing on key indicators of demographic change and equity; charts, graphs, and maps; and stories about how local leaders are using equity data to catalyze conversations and implement equitable growth strategies and policies.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Community action, Cultural diversity, Data analysis, Economic factors, Equal opportunities, Geographic regions, Inclusion, Policy development, Racial factors, Social change, Statewide planning, Statistical data

Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Best practices: Creating an LGBT-inclusive school climate—A teaching tolerance guide for school leaders. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This guide for school leaders provides information about how to create a tolerant environment at school that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The guide discusses building an inclusive school climate and preventing and addressing problems (such as bullying and harassment).

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Bullying, Homosexuality, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Prevention, Schools, Sexual harassment, Sexuality, Tolerance

Joint Commission. 2011. Advancing effective communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community: A field guide. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Joint Commission, 92 pp.

Annotation: This field guide is intended to help hospitals and health care organizations improve quality of care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients and their families by enhancing efforts to provide care that is more welcoming, safe, and inclusive. The guide presents strategies for creating processes, policies, and programs that are sensitive to and inclusive of LGBT individuals and their families. Topics include leadership; provision of care, treatment, and services; work force; data collection and use; and patient, family, and community engagement. Each chapter contains recommended issues to address and practice examples.

Contact: Joint Commission, One Renaissance Boulevard, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181, Telephone: (630) 792-5800 Fax: (630) 792-5005 Web Site: http://www.jointcommission.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Families, Health care delivery, Homosexuality, Hospitals, Inclusion, Leadership, Policies, Programs, Sexual identity, Statistical data, Treatment

Cate D, Diefendorf M, McCullough K, Peters M, Whaley K. 2010. Quality indicators of inclusive childhood programs/practices: A compilation of selected resources. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, 32 pp.

Annotation: This paper is a compilation of select resources and indicators of high quality inclusive childhood programs and practices that serve the needs and priorities of infants and young children with disabilities and their families. There are five main sections within the compilation: (1) Quality Inclusion Practice Considerations, which provide general strategies to enhance the quality of inclusion experiences for children and families; (2) Classroom Observation Rating Tools, which allow the user to assess and rate quality practices within settings.; (3) Individual Child Focused Considerations, which provide an inventory of quality indicators; (4) Collaborative Inclusion Practices, which provide several examples of self assessment tools for the appraisal of collaboration within a community; and (5) Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS), which provide information on systems that are designed to rate the quality of child care settings and includes standards related to the inclusion of children with special needs. The paper discusses what is meant by inclusion, and describes how to use the compilation.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Disabilities, Early childhood education, Families, Health care systems, Inclusion, Infants with special health care needs, Measures, Program improvement

National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System. 2010. Expanding opportunities: An interagency inclusion initiative. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the activities of the Expanding Opportunities Initiative -- a partnership established by four federal agencies to promote collaborative efforts in states that would result in high-quality, inclusive opportunities for children with disabilities and their families. The fact sheet provides background information on the initiative; lists participating states; and describes the activities and responsibilities of the states as well as the federal partners. It describes how technical assistance (TA) projects can offer expertise and share responsibilities for Expanding Opportunities activities and includes examples of changes that states have made in their efforts to increase the numbers of children served in high quality, inclusive settings.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health promotion, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Disabilities, Federal initiatives, Inclusion, State agencies, Young children

California Department of Education, Children's Development Division. 2009. Inclusion works!: Creating child care programs that promote belonging for children with special needs. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, 85 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this handbook is to help child care providers learn strategies that promote inclusion of and a sense of belonging for all children. Topics include (1) including children with disabilities or other special needs, (2) comparing inclusive child care and quality child care, (3) creating inclusive child care settings, (4) identifying and finding help, and (5) collaborating for inclusion.

Contact: California Department of Education, 1430 N Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (916) 319-0800 Secondary Telephone: (916) 445-4556 Web Site: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ 19.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8011-1689-6.

Keywords: Child care, Child care services, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Inclusion, Young children

Child Care Law Center. 2009. Questions and answers about the Americans with Disabilities Act: A quick reference for child care providers (Upd. ed.). San Francisco, CA: Child Care Law Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This quick reference describes the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- including those in the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 -- that are relevant to child care providers and programs. It defines what the ADA is and explains who is protected by it; whether or not specific child care programs are required to achieve compliance; and the types of child care policies, procedures, and accommodations the ADA requires. It is available in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

Contact: Child Care Law Center, 221 Pine Street, Third Floor, San Francisco, CA 94104, Telephone: (415) 394-7144 Fax: (415) 394-7140 E-mail: info@childcarelaw.org Web Site: http://www.childcarelaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Asian language materials, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Federal legislation, Inclusion, Spanish language materials

Sweet M. 2008. A thinking guide to inclusive childcare for those who care about young children with and without disabilities. Madison, WI: Disability Rights Wisconsin, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers ideas and strategies to support staff in developing childcare practices that consider the needs of individual children and promote an inclusive experience for the families of children in childcare. Contents include inviting parents to talk, getting to know a child, understanding behavior, helping children learn, inclusion and finding many ways to participate, children with developmental disabilities, talking about children to their parents, and staff issues. The document provides additional information on Children and the Americans with Disabilities Act and conversation pages to use with parents and children

Contact: Disability Rights Wisconsin, 131 West Wilson Street, Suite 700, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (800) 928-8778 Secondary Telephone: (888) 758-6049 Fax: (608) 267-0368 Web Site: http://www.disabilityrightswi.org $7.00; also available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child care, Developmental disabilities, Child behavior, Child care services, Inclusion, Children with special health care needs

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2005. Transforming mental health care in America: The federal action agenda—First steps. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Annotation: This report articulates objectives for the initiation of a long-term strategy designed to move the nation's public and private mental health service delivery toward the day when all adults with serious mental illnesses and all children with serious emotional disturbances will live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities. The report, which includes an executive summary, provides background on the New Freedom Initiative (which is designed to promote full access to community life for people with disabilities) and discusses the need for a transformed mental health system, focusing on recovery, the process of transformation, transforming the system, and highlights of the action agenda. The report includes two appendices: (1) an executive order and (2) an acronyms list.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Disabilities, Emotional instability, Federal initiatives, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Inclusion, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services

President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. 2003. Achieving the promise: Transforming mental health care in America—Final report. Washington, DC: President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 105 pp., exec. summ. (36 pp.).

Annotation: This report makes recommendations that would enable adults with serious mental illnesses and children with serious emotional disturbance to live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities. The reports lists six goals and provides information for understanding each goal and recommendations for achieving the goals. The goals cover these topics: (1) that mental health is essential to overall health; (2) that mental health care is consumer and family driven; (3) that disparities in mental health services should be eliminated; (4) that early mental health screening, assessment, and referral to services should be common practice; (5) that excellent mental health care should be delivered and research accelerated; and (6) that technology is used to access mental health care and information. The report describes several model programs.

Contact: SAMHSA's National Mental Health Information Center, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, P.O. Box 42557, Washington, DC 20015, Telephone: (800) 789-2647 Secondary Telephone: (866) 889-2647 Fax: (240) 221-4295 E-mail: info@mentalhealth.org Web Site: http://store.samhsa.gov/home Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS SMA-03-3832 (full report), SMA-03-3831 (summary).

Keywords: Adults, Children, Inclusion, Mental disorders, Mental health services, Model programs

Domestic Policy Council. 2001-2007. President's New Freedom Initiative. Washington, DC: Domestic Policy Council, multiple items.

Annotation: This archived website provides documents related to President George W. Bush's New Freedom Initiative, an Administration blueprint for eliminating barriers to the full integration of people with disabilities in the United States. It includes news, progress reports, and related documents.

Contact: Domestic Policy Council, The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20500, Telephone: (202) 456-1414 Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/dpc/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communities, Developmental disabilities, Disabilities, Educational opportunities, Inclusion, Programs, Special education, Technology

Cross TL, Earle K, Solie HE, Manness K. 2000. Cultural strengths and challenges in implementing a system of care model in American Indian communities. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 94 pp. (Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 2000 series; v. 1)

Annotation: This volume is first in the 2000 series of monographs of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program, a federal grant program that assists communities in building fully inclusive organized systems of care for children who are experiencing a serious emotional disturbance and their families. The monograph examines promising practices of five American Indian children's mental health projects that integrate traditional American Indian helping and healing methods with the systems of care model.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (888) 457-1551 Fax: E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://cecp.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Child mental health, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Health care systems, Inclusion, Mental disorders, Service integration

San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health. 1994. Starting point—Children are children first: Mainstreaming children in a child care setting. [San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health?], 1 videotape (30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape educates child care providers about requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the needs of children with special health needs, the benefits of inclusion for both children with special needs and the typically developing, and how to build a successful inclusion program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-4695 Web Site: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Audiovisual materials, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Inclusion, Videotapes

Kretzmann JP, McKnight JL. 1993. Building communities from the inside out: A path toward finding and mobilizing a community's assets. Chicago, IL: ACTA Publications, 376 pp.

Annotation: This book shows how community groups, organizations, and local governmental agencies can work together to identify the strengths of the community and to use them to solve local problems; it relies on the idea of asset-based community development. The idea focuses on assessing the social needs of the individual families and the community as a whole and their strengths and using those assets to solve local problems. The introduction provides an overview of the concepts; subsequent chapters focus on involving individuals (including youths, seniors, persons with special health needs, and individuals with low incomes), local associations, organizations, and institutions; rebuilding the community's economy; summarizing the asset-based community development process; and outlining ways to build support for the process. A videotape training program which introduces the idea of asset-based community development is also available.

Contact: ACTA Publications, 5559 W. Howard Street, Shokie, IL 60077, Telephone: (800) 397-2282 Fax: (800) 397-0079 E-mail: acta@actapublications.com Web Site: http://www.actapublications.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87946-108-x.

Keywords: Agencies, Communities, Community organizations, Community participation, Development, Inclusion, Low income groups, Outreach, Planning, Problem solving, Senior citizens, Services, Social problems, Special health care needs, Youth

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Development Services, President's Committee on Mental Retardation. 1989?. Report to the President on a presidential forum: Citizens with mental retardation and community integration. Washington, DC: President's Committee on Mental Retardation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This booklet summarizes the results of a Presidential Forum on Citizens with Mental Retardation and Community Integration held in Washington, DC in February, 1988. It summarizes the discussions and makes twelve recommendations to improve services provided to people with mental retardation.

Contact: President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W, Washington, DC 20201-20447, Telephone: (202) 619-0634 Fax: (202) 205-9519 Web Site: http://www.acl.gov/Programs/AIDD/Programs/PCPID/index.aspx Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adults, Community based services, Inclusion, Mental retardation, Special health care needs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Development Services, President's Committee on Mental Retardation. 1989. A presidential forum: Citizens with mental retardation and community integration. Washington, DC: President's Committee on Mental Retardation, 289 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings present papers from a forum held in Washington, DC in February, 1988 to examine the national effort to develop community-based programs for citizens with mental retardation. Plenary sessions discussed the role of the President's Committee on Mental Retardation, drug abuse, public awareness and acceptance, the family role, zoning, real estate and related issues, financing, promotion of integration, and transition into the community. Panels addressed living arrangements, employment, transportation, education, recreation/leisure/socialization, family supports/respite care, life services planning, quality assurance, health care, and citizen advocacy.

Contact: President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W, Washington, DC 20201-20447, Telephone: (202) 619-0634 Fax: (202) 205-9519 Web Site: http://www.acl.gov/Programs/AIDD/Programs/PCPID/index.aspx Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adults, Community based programs, Conference proceedings, Inclusion, Mental retardation, Special health care needs

Kolucki B. 1989. Developing strategies for communications about disability: Experiences in the U.S., Hong Kong, India and Pakistan. New York, NY: World Rehabilitation Fund, 67 pp. (Monograph no. 47)

Annotation: This book describes the author's experience in working with the children's television program Sesame Street in including children with physical and mental disabilities on that program, and her experiences providing consultation services in Hong Kong, India, and Pakistan on improving the portrayal of children with disabilities in the media.

Contact: World Rehabilitation Fund, 16 E. 40th St. Suite # 704 , New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 532-6000 E-mail: wrfnewyork@msn.com Web Site: http://www.worldrehabfund.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Inclusion, International programs, Mass media, Media campaigns

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.