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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (54 total).

Dahl T. n.d.. The systems development project accounting system: A framework for cost-effectiveness analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 19 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-6 (17))

Annotation: This paper describes the output-oriented accounting system of the Systems Development Project used to perform economic analysis of the Children and Youth Program projects. This is part of a series to document and assess the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Accounting, Administration, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Economics, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Larsen B. n.d.. A generalization of the volume effect and its application in cost-effectiveness analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 36 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-6 (18))

Annotation: This paper discusses the problems of the Children and Youth Program projects in obtaining cost reporting data to provide comparable data for inter-project comparisons and for comparisons of a specific project to an image of itself of theoretical perfection. This is part of a series to document and asses the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Administration, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Cost effectiveness, Economics, Program evaluation

Utah Children. 2016. Measures of child well-being in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Children, annual.

Annotation: This annual statistical summary provides information on the health, education, safety, and economic security of children in Utah. The introduction includes general demographic information about the state and presents a long-range view of what factors contribute to a family's well-being. Analytical essays are included for each category of data reviewed and the statistics are presented in tables by county with state totals. This publication continues "Key Facts," which was published between 1990 and 1994.

Contact: Voices for Utah Children, 747 East South Temple, Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, Telephone: (801) 364-1182 Secondary Telephone: (877) 445-2447 Fax: (801) 364-1186 E-mail: karen@utahchildren.org Web Site: http://www.utahchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child safety, Children, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Health status, Socioeconomic factors, Utah

Steuerle E, Jackson LM, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Use of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. 2016. Advancing the power of economic evidence to inform investments in children, youth, and families. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 218 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study on how to improve the use of economic evidence to inform investments in children, youth, and families. Topics include methods for economic evaluation and how current practices in the production of economic evidence could be improved. Contents include a roadmap outlining a multipronged strategy for fostering multistakeholder partnerships to address issues and for improving incentives for the use of economic evidence for various stakeholders, ranging from publishers of economic research results to program evaluators.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-44059-2.

Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Economics, Evaluation, Families, Methods, Models, Research, Youth

Woolf SH, Aron L, Chapman DA, Dubay L, Zimerman E, Snellings LC, Hall L, Haley AD, Holla N, Ayers K, Lowenstein C, Waidmann TA. 2016. The health of the states: How U.S. states compare in health status and the factors that shape health–Summary report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying supplemental reports, present findings on the status of Americans' health at the state level, along with the diverse factors associated with health. The report examines how state-level variations in health outcomes correlate with variations in factors thought to shape or influence health (health determinants) from five domains including health behaviors, health systems, economic and social factors, physical and social environmental factors, and public policies and social spending. Contents include research and policy priorities emerging from the analysis. Maps and charts are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Decision making, Economics, Geographic factors, Health behaviors, Health status, Health systems, Life course, Protective factors, Public policy, Risk factors, Social factors

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

Iowa Department of Public Health. 2014–. Parentivity. Des Moines, Iowa Department of Health,

Annotation: This web-based community for parents provides personalized content to reduce family risks and optimize parenting resourcefulness, family resilience, child growth, and school readiness. The website is designed to recognize early warning signs of risk in areas of health, prenatal care, parenting skills, family functioning, and child development and will alert parents and recommend supportive resources and strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Child health, Community development, Domestic violence, Family economics, Family support programs, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Parenting, Program coordination, Public private partnerships, School readinesss

Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, The Children's Dental Policy. 2014. Expanding the dental team: Studies of two private practices. Washington, DC; Pew Charitable Trusts, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents two case studies of private dental practices that employ dental therapists (Minnesota, United States and Saskatchewan, Canada). Each case study describes the rules governing dental therapists; the dental practice and the role of the dental therapist in the practice; supervision; and the impact of the dental therapist on productivity (quantity of services performed), access to care for underserved populations, time spent by the dentist on complex vs. routine procedures, and practice profits.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Case studies, Dentistry, Economics, Oral health, Underserved communities, Work force

Laudenbach JM, Frediani R. 2014. Human papillomavirus vaccination for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States: A cost-benefit analysis. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the potential relationship between the benefits of human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization and the costs of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Contents include information about oral HPV infection and HPV vaccination; an economic cost-benefit analysis; and conclusions.

Contact: Center for Oral Health, 309 East Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766-1854, Telephone: (909) 469-8300 Fax: (510) 380-6637 E-mail: info@tc4oh.org Web Site: http://www.centerfororalhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Economics, Human papillomavirus, Immunization, Oral health, Policy development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Vaccination effects, Vaccines

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2013. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 1 v.

Annotation: This database is designed for use by researchers, the media, public health professionals, and the public in learning about the public health and economic burden associated with unintentional and violence-related injury in the United States. Contents include fatal and nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost of injury data from a variety of sources. Users can search, sort, and view the data and create reports, charts, and maps based on the intent of injury; mechanism (cause) of injury; body region; nature (type) of injury; geographic location where the injury occurred; and the sex, race and ethnicity, and age of the injured person. Mobile applications (for iPhone and iPad) are also available.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Databases, Economics, Injuries, Integrated information systems, Mobile applications, Public health

Levi J, Segal LM, Miller AF, Lang A. 2013. A healthier America 2013: Strategies to move from sick care to health care in the next four years. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 98 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the status of a range of public health policy areas and identifies priority steps that should be taken to put prevention first in the health system. The report features a series of case studies from across the country that illustrate strategies in action. The examples demonstrate how implementing the prevention initiatives and programs laid out in the report can provide a significant return on investment in terms of improved health and cost containment. In addition, the report highlights a series of 10 ongoing public health priority initiatives focused on the obesity epidemic; preventing tobacco use and exposure; health and aging; racial, ethnic, and economic disparities; maternal and infant health; health and the environment; injury prevention; infectious disease prevention; public health emergency preparedness; and food safety.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Economics, Health care reform, Health status, Prevention, Public policy, Service delivery systems

Whitsel LP, Biagioli BD, Fisher DM, Humphreys BR, Lieberman SM, Ruseski JE. 2013. The economics of physical activity promotion in the United States. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes a forum held in 2012 in Washington, DC, and outlines how researchers and advocates can frame policy work around physical activity promotion to make the case that transforming surrounding environments to promote active living is a worthy investment.

Contact: National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity, 805 15th Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 449-8372 Fax: (202) 466-9666 Web Site: http://www.ncppa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Economics, Environment, Health promotion, Physical activity, Policy development, Research

Conti G, Heckman JJ. 2012. The economics of child well-being. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 57 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18466)

Annotation: This paper presents an integrated economic approach that interprets and organizes evidence indicating how the capabilities shaped during child development impact health and well being across the life course. The paper discusses the indicators used for measuring child well being in international studies; reviews earlier work on the economic approach to child well being; discusses the recent developmental approach; summarizes empirical findings; and presents evidence from interventions that promote child well being. The paper concludes with some open questions and suggestions for future research.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Data, Economics, Factor analysis, Life course, Measures, Protective factors, Research, Risk factors

LaVeist TA, Gaskin DJ, Richard P. 2011. The economic burden of health inequalities in the United States. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents findings from a study to estimate the economic burden of health disparities in the United States using the following three measures: direct medical costs of health inequalities, indirect costs of health inequities, and costs of premature death. Topics include the potential cost savings of eliminating health disparities and productivity loss associated with health inequalities for racial and ethnic minorities.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Access to health care, Asian Americans, Blacks, Economics, Equal opportunities, Ethnic factors, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Racial factors, Research

Sell K, Zlotnik S, Noonan K, Rubin D. 2010. The effect of recession on child well-being: A synthesis of the evidence by PolicyLab, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Washington, DC: First Focus, 41 pp.

Annotation: This research paper synthesizes evidence of the effects of recession on child well-being. It examines four domains – health, food security, housing stability, and maltreatment – and reviews the relationship of each to the well-being of children during periods of economic downturn. Included are key findings indicating that it can takes years for families to bounce back to their previous income levels after a recession but that public programs play a role in blunting the negative impacts.. The paper presents trend data over time and provides lessons learned from prior recessions in efforts to foster more informed policy making related to child well being.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Data, Economic factors, Family economics, High risk children, Housing, Nutrition, Policy development, Research, Trends

Kleiner MM, Park KW. 2010. Battles among licensed occupations: Analyzing government regulations on labor market outcomes for dentists and hygienists. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 42 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16560)

Annotation: This paper focuses on the labor market implications of government requirements related to tasks that dental hygienists are allowed to perform and to dentists’ supervision of dental hygienists’ work. Topics include the evolution of licensing for dentists and hygienists, the legal conditions governing permissible tasks for hygienists that impact both occupations, and the conflict that has arisen over the allocation of work and supervision of tasks.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: Dental hygienists, Dentists, Economics, Licensing, Market research, Oral health, Regulations, Work force

Pew Children's Dental Campaign. 2010. It takes a team: How new dental providers can benefit patients and practices. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 4 items.

Annotation: This report examines the potential effects of dental therapists and hygienist-therapists on the productivity and profits of private dental practices. Contents include scenarios of how types of health professionals could change client capacity and revenues of private practices. Contents include scenarios of how types of health professionals could change client capacity and revenues of private practices. Implications for policy are also discussed. The economic tool – the Productivity and Profit Calculator – used to create the scenarios is provided separately to help advocates, dentists, and policymakers assess the unique variables from their states or communities to better understand the potential effects of adding allied health professionals to the oral health team.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Allied health personnel, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Economics, Independent practice associates, Oral health, Organizational change, Productivity, Work force

Bernard D, Banthin J. 2009. Family-level expenditures on health care and insurance premiums among the U.S. nonelderly population, 2006. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 24 pp. (MEPS research findings no. 29)

Annotation: This report uses estimates from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to examine family level expenditures on health care services and health insurance premiums in the U.S. across different health insurance plans and sizes of non-elderly families. The report includes extensive data tables.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Family economics, Health care costs, Health insurance, National surveys

Every Mother and Rich Winter Design and Multimedia. 2008. Business case for breastfeeding: Steps for creating a breastfeeding friendly worksite. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 resource kit (5 items)

Annotation: This 5-piece resource kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging businesses and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation support programs for their employees. The five components include 1) a business case for breastfeeding; 2) easy steps to supporting breastfeeding employees; 3) a toolkit with resources for building a lactation support program; 4) an employees guide to breastfeeding and working; and 5) an outreach marketing guide. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Costs, Economics, Family support programs, Infant health, Policy development, Women's health, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Kilburn MR, Karoly LA. 2008. The economics of early childhood policy: What the dismal sicence has to say about investing in children. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 34 pp. (Occasional paper)

Annotation: This paper reviews a body of literature that discusses early childhood related policy implications of the economic and business theories of human capital and monetary payoffs from early childhood investments. These theories focus more on investment and prevention than on treatment. In evaluating and summarizing the literature, the paper extracts recommendations for policy-makers, service providers, and the public concerning the orientation of early childhood care investments and how these investments correlate to taxpayer savings, health outcomes, and quality of life.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Cost effectiveness, Economics, Prevention services, Programs, Public policy, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.