Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

9.1 The percent of adolescent health vendors receiving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) cultural competency training. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percentage of adolescent health vendors receiving training to improve rates of intervention when bullying/harassment is witnessed and increase the number of supportive staff available to LGBTQ youth.

Numerator: Number of adolescent health vendors receiving LGBTQ cultural competency training.

Denominator: Number of adolescent health vendors.

Significance: According to the Bullying in US Schools 2014 Status Report using data from the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire, 17 precent of all students were involved in bullying by either being bullied, bullying others or both being bullied and bullying others. Bullying affects youth negatively in many ways. Youth who are bullied are more likely to experience depression and anxiety, changes in sleep and eating patterns and decreased academic achievement and school participation. Academic success has a direct impact on their employment prospects and future earnings potential, which impact health and access to health care in adulthood. LGBTQ youth and those perceived as LGBTQ are at an increased risk of being bullied. Bullied LGBTQ youth, or youth perceived as LGBTQ are more likely to skip school, smoke, use alcohol and drugs, or engage in other risky behaviors. Lesbian, gay or bisexual youth are more than twice as likely as their peers to be depressed and think about or attempt suicide. Bias based on gender; social/socio-economic class and privilege; gender orientation, sexual preference, and gender identity; mental, physical and emotional ability/disability; physical appearance (most notably obesity); and religion are frequently at the center of bullying and discrimination in schools. Improving knowledge and competency in these areas can help programs more effectively prevent bullying and more appropriately react to bullying when it happens.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data collection and analysis will be performed by the adolescent health vendors. It will be a grant deliverable as required by the work statement and reported to DOH via quarterly reports.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

9.2 The number of students who participate in an evidence-based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills (Florida)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of students who participate in an evidence based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills.

Numerator: The number of students completing Positive Youth Development programs and the number of students participating in the Green Dot high School strategy overview and bystander training..

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Positive Youth Development is an evidence-based strategy that focuses on asset-building and goal-setting as a means of risk reduction. PYD programs have been proven to positively impact teen birth, healthy relationships, college and career preparation, and overall self-esteem. The PYD approach supports the physical, emotional, social and mental health of adolescents. Research shows risk factors such as poor social competence, low academic achievement, impulsiveness, truancy, and poverty increase an individual’s risk of violence. Developing youth life skills, improving their participation and performance in school, and increasing their prospects for employment can help protect them from violence, both in childhood and later in life. Developing life skills for intervention and self-empowerment can help young people avoid violence, by improving their social and emotional competencies and teaching them how to deal effectively and non-violently with conflict.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Programmatic sign in sheets/class rosters and the Florida Department of Health Sexual Violence Data Registry

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50,000

9.5 Finalize bullying prevention curriculum with OSSE (District of Columbia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To decrease incidents of bullying and other forms of interpersonal violence in the District of Columbia by creating a series of lessons to help middle school students learn how to use technology and social media in a healthy and supportive way.

Numerator: N/A

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Bullying and other forms of interpersonal violence are a significant problem in the District. According to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), over 12 percent of high school students (about 10,000 students) and just under 31 percent of middle school students (about 8,700 students) reported being bullied at school in the previous school year. To note, DC's rate of physical fighting in middle school students is higher than any other city, territory, or state that participated in the 2015 YRBS. Additionally, a recent national survey of 12 to 17-year-old youth found that 34 percent of students had experienced cyber-bullying – of which two thirds (64 percent) indicated that the cyber-bullying affected their abilities to learn at school. Importantly, the clear majority of youth (83 percent) who reported being cyber-bullied on this survey also reported being bullied in person. In order to effectively address the issue of bullying and other forms of interpersonal violence, prevention efforts must be implemented in the District.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Office of Human Rights

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

9.7 Number of LGBTQ youth receiving evidence-informed suicide prevention programming. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To annually increase the number of LGBTQ youth who have access to suicide prevention services.

Numerator: Number of LGBTQ youth who have access to suicide prevention services.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: LGBTQ youth face a variety of challenges, both environmental and individual, that shape how they view themselves as well as their perception of how they view others. LGBTQ youth and those perceived as LGBTQ are at an increased risk of being bullied. Bullied LGBTQ youth, or youth perceived as LGBTQ are more likely to skip school, smoke, use alcohol and drugs, or engage in other risky behaviors. Lesbian, gay or bisexual youth are more than twice as likely as their peers to be depressed and think about or attempt suicide. LGBTQ youth suffer alarmingly high rates of bullying and violence in schools, alcohol and drug use, sexually transmitted infections (including HIV/AIDS), suicide and homelessness. Some statistics include: o 84.6 percent of LGBTQ students reported being verbally harassed, 40.1 percent reported being physically harassed and 18.8 percent reported being physically assaulted at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation. o Nearly two-thirds (61.1 percent) of students reported that they felt unsafe in school because of their sexual orientation. o 38.4 percent of LGBTQ youth drank alcohol before age 13, compared with 21.3 percent of heterosexual youth. o LGBTQ youth report rates of suicide attempts from 20 to 40 percent and lifetime prevalence suicide attempt rates ranging from 7 to 20 percent as adults. To help LGBTQ youth better manage their life experiences, support from adults is essential and, in some cases, life changing. Parents and caregivers play an important role in the self-esteem of any child; receiving support from their parents and/or caregivers is integral to the positive physical, mental and emotional health of LGBTQ youth. While some LGBTQ youth may not receive support and positive reinforcement from parents and/or caregivers, the support they receive from one staff person at a local agency (possibly a manager, facilitator or program director) can positively affect their outcomes.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data collection and analysis will be performed by the Grantee. It will be a grant deliverable as required by the work statement and reported to DOH via quarterly reports. This ESM is not directly linked to NPM 9, but is linked to the following priority: Protective factors are established for adolescents and young adults prior to and during critical life stages.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.