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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 7 (7 total).

ESM 9.1 The number of students who participate in an evidence-based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills (Florida)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy 9.2 "Strengths-Based Classroom Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/9-2.php). Find other NPM 9 classroom-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of students who participate in an evidence based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills.

Numerator: The number of students completing Positive Youth Development programs and the number of students participating in the Green Dot high School strategy overview and bystander training..

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Positive Youth Development is an evidence-based strategy that focuses on asset-building and goal-setting as a means of risk reduction. PYD programs have been proven to positively impact teen birth, healthy relationships, college and career preparation, and overall self-esteem. The PYD approach supports the physical, emotional, social and mental health of adolescents. Research shows risk factors such as poor social competence, low academic achievement, impulsiveness, truancy, and poverty increase an individual’s risk of violence. Developing youth life skills, improving their participation and performance in school, and increasing their prospects for employment can help protect them from violence, both in childhood and later in life. Developing life skills for intervention and self-empowerment can help young people avoid violence, by improving their social and emotional competencies and teaching them how to deal effectively and non-violently with conflict.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Programmatic sign in sheets/class rosters and the Florida Department of Health Sexual Violence Data Registry

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 50,000

ESM 9.1 Reduce the percentage of high school students who are electronically bullied (Simple Counting being bullied through texting, Instagram, Facebook, or other social media). (New Jersey)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Suicide Prevention In-class Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/9-5.php). Find other NPM 9 adolescent-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Reduce the percentage of high school students who are electronically bullied

Numerator: Students reporting electronic bullying (Simple Counting being bullied through texting, Instagram, Facebook, or other social media).

Denominator: Students completing the survey.

Significance: Cyber-bullying can lead to the same psychological effects as bullying on school grounds. Low self-esteem, loneliness, poor academic performance, and increased potential to engage in risky behaviors such as drug use, alcohol use and early/unprotected sex can impact both the bullied and the bully. Although most school policies include cyber-bullying policies, it is significantly harder to track and can have a more exponential impact due to the nature of social media. Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) combined with social media awareness can dramatically reduce bullying because it teaches the skills, attitudes and behaviors that teens who bully are typically deficient in and can lead them to bully in the first place. SEL creates an anti-bullying environment that can be extended to online activities by teaching adolescents how to better manage their emotions both on and offline while promoting a safe and caring learning environment where all adolescents are supported and respected.

Data Sources and Data Issues: CDC High School YRBS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.1 Percent of 8th grade Youth Health Promoters (YHP) who report not being bullied in Puerto Rico by September 2021-2025 (Puerto Rico)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy 9.1 "Peer-Led Counseling, Mentoring, and Support" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/9-1.php). Find other NPM 9 youth-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percentage of YHP who report not being bullied after finalizing three years of Youth Health Promoters Project (YHPP).

Numerator: YHP that report not being bullied on the 3rd year post survey

Denominator: YHP that completed the 3rd year post survey

Significance: Bullying experiences are associated with a number of behavioral, emotional, and physical adjustment problems. Victims of bullying tend to report feelings of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and isolation; poor school performance; suicidal ideation; and suicide attempts. Around 22% of students from 9th to 12th grade in Puerto Rico reported being bullied (2017 PR-YRBSS). Every year, the YHPP recruits 6th grade students in order to provide a series of educational interventions during a period of three years. Recognizing bullying as priority, effective communication, interpersonal relationships, communication and no discrimination, are among the topics that are discussed with the YHP during the three years cycle. Furthermore, the YHP create activities each year to promote health and wellbeing with their peers and raise awareness in various topics, including bullying. The YHP complete a pre (6th grade) and post (8th grade) surveys focused on their attitudes and behaviors before and after receiving the three years of the project. It is expected that 8th grade promoters report less frequently any events related to bullying after the YHPP intervention.

Data Sources and Data Issues: YHPP 3rd post survey.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.1 Kids' Link Referral Network (Rhode Island)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of adolescents screened for suicide ideation to KIDSLINK for appropriate referrals and supports

Numerator: Students at-risk of non-suicidal self-harm, suicidal ideation, or having risk factors that may influence suicidal ideation or non-suicidal self-harm referred to Kids' Link

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Many school districts transported all children who expressed suicide ideation to the nearest ED, regardless of the severity crisis. The Suicide Prevention Initiative (SPI) is a collaboration of RIDOH and Rhode Island Student Assistance Services, and Bradley Hospital's Kids Link RI hotline. SPI protocol provides guidelines for determining if a student is in immediate danger of killing her/himself and needs to be transported to a local hospital, or if the child's mental health/behavioral needs can be met outside of an emergency department.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Kids' Link RI; incomplete referrals may vary (reporting schools only needed clinical consultation, parents couldn't be reached, parents declined services)

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.2 Reduce the percentage of high school students who are bullied on school property. (New Jersey)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Suicide Prevention In-class Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/9-5.php). Find other NPM 9 adolescent-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Reduce the percentage of high school students bullied on school property.

Numerator: Students reporting being bullied on school property.

Denominator: Students completing the survey.

Significance: Bullying can lead to significant psychological effects as low self-esteem, loneliness, poor academic performance, and increased potential to engage in risky behaviors such as drug use, alcohol use and early/unprotected sex. These issues may persist into adulthood. It should be recognized that these mental impacts do not stop at the bullied, they also extended to the bullies. Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) can dramatically reduce bullying because it teaches the skills, attitudes and behaviors that teens who bully are typically deficient in and can lead them to bully in the first place. People are not born with the ability to manage their emotions and get along with others, these skills must be cultivated in caring and nurturing environments. SEL creates an anti-bullying environment by teaching adolescents how to better manage their emotions while promoting a safe and caring learning environment where all adolescents are supported and respected.

Data Sources and Data Issues: CDC High School YRBS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.3 Percent of adolescents who are physically active at least 60 minutes per day. (Utah)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: ESM aligns with priority, however it is not in direct alignment with NPM (most aligned with NPM 8). See other ESMs for this NPM (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=&NPM=9&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) or find other NPM 9 consumer-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of students who are active for at least 60 minutes a day through a variety options throughout the school day.

Numerator: TBD

Denominator: TBD

Significance: Physical activity has brain health benefits for school-aged children, including improved cognition (e.g., academic performance, memory) and reduced symptoms of depression. Regular physical activity in childhood and adolescence can also be important for promoting lifelong health and well-being and preventing risk factors for various health conditions like heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program records, Utah Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, Utah State Office of Education

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.5 The proportion of Utah students participating in an evidence-based school based prevention program (PAX Good Behavior Game). (Utah)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Strengths-Based Classroom Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/9-2.php). Find other NPM 9 classroom-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the proportion of Utah students participating in an evidence-based school based prevention program to reduce referrals for fighting, bullying, and other forms of aggression.

Numerator: Number of students participating in an evidence-based prevention program

Denominator: Number of Utah students

Significance: Multiple systematic reviews of various universal school-based programs demonstrate beneficial impacts on youth’s skills and behaviors, including delinquency, aggression, bullying perpetration and victimization, and bystander skills that lower the likelihood of violence and support victims. For example, the Task Force for Community Preventive Services found a 15% relative reduction in violent behavior among students in pre-kindergarten through high school. Using different outcome measures, the median relative reduction in aggression and violent behavior associated with universal school-based programs varied by grade level, with a 32% reduction for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students, 18% reduction for elementary students, 7% reduction for middle school students, and 29% reduction for high school students. Researchers suggest the benefits of these school-based approaches could be strengthened if programs implemented at early grade levels are continued into the critical high school years. These programs were effective in reducing youth violence in different types of school environments, including ones with varying socioeconomic status, crime rates, or predominant race/ethnicity of students. Examples of effective classroom-based programs are Good Behavior Game (GBG), Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies®; (PATHS), Life Skills®; Training (LST), and Steps to Respect (STR). The GBG has demonstrated that participants had significantly lower levels of classroom aggression in elementary school, and some studies of the long-term effects of GBG showed significantly lower levels of aggression in middle school and lower prevalence of antisocial personality disorder and violent crime by age 19 to 21.These effects were for male youth with relatively higher levels of earlyaggression when compared to youth in alternative intervention conditions. These participants also had lower prevalence of alcohol abuse, smoking, and suicidal ideation by the time they reached young

Data Sources and Data Issues: Utah State Board of Education, Student Violence and Injury Reporting System

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.