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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 3 (3 total).

ESM 9.1 The percent of Bureau of Family Health and Nursing Services receiving lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) cultural competency training. (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the percentage of Bureau of Family Health and Nursing Services personnel receiving training to improve rates of injury intervention when treating/educating/referring lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) clients

Numerator: Number of Bureau of Family Health and Nursing Services personnel receiving LGBTQ cultural competency training.

Denominator: Number of Bureau of Family Health and Nursing Services personnel

Significance: Bullying affects youth negatively in many ways. Youth who are bullied are more likely to experience depression and anxiety, changes in sleep and eating patterns and decreased academic achievement and school participation. Academic success has a direct impact on their employment prospects and future earnings potential, which impact health and access to health care in adulthood. LGBTQ youth and those perceived as LGBTQ are at an increased risk of being bullied. Bullied LGBTQ youth, or youth perceived as LGBTQ are more likely to skip school, smoke, use alcohol and drugs, or engage in other risky behaviors. Lesbian, gay or bisexual youth are more than twice as likely as their peers to be depressed and think about or attempt suicide. Bias based on gender; social/socio-economic class and privilege; gender orientation, sexual preference, and gender identity; mental, physical and emotional ability/disability; physical appearance (most notably obesity); and religion are frequently at the center of bullying and discrimination in schools. Improving knowledge and competency in these areas can help programs more effectively prevent bullying and more appropriately react to bullying when it happens.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Bureau of Family Health and Nursing Services

Year: 2021

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 9.1 The number of students who participate in an evidence-based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills (Florida)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy 9.2 "Strengths-Based Classroom Training". Find other NPM 9 classroom-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of students who participate in an evidence based program that promotes positive youth development and non-violence intervention skills.

Numerator: The number of students completing Positive Youth Development programs and the number of students participating in the Green Dot high School strategy overview and bystander training..

Denominator: Count

Significance:

Data Sources and Data Issues: Positive Youth Development is an evidence-based strategy that focuses on asset-building and goal-setting as a means of risk reduction. PYD programs have been proven to positively impact teen birth, healthy relationships, college and career preparation, and overall self-esteem. The PYD approach supports the physical, emotional, social and mental health of adolescents. Research shows risk factors such as poor social competence, low academic achievement, impulsiveness, truancy, and poverty increase an individual’s risk of violence. Developing youth life skills, improving their participation and performance in school, and increasing their prospects for employment can help protect them from violence, both in childhood and later in life. Developing life skills for intervention and self-empowerment can help young people avoid violence, by improving their social and emotional competencies and teaching them how to deal effectively and non-violently with conflict.

Year: 2021

Unit Type: 50000, Unit Number: Programmatic sign in sheets/class rosters and the Florida Department of Health Sexual Violence Data Registry

ESM 9.1 Number of secondary schools implementing the Michigan Model for Healthâ„¢ Social and Emotional Health Module with 80% fidelity (Michigan)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=social+and+emotional+health&NPM=9&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/9-bullying.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 3: Measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 6. Utilize legal and regulatory actions

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Annually increase by six the number of secondary schools implementing the Michigan Model for Healthâ„¢ Social and Emotional Health Module with 80% fidelity

Numerator: The number of secondary schools implementing the Michigan Model for Healthâ„¢ Social and Emotional Health Module with 80% fidelity

Denominator: Count

Significance:

Data Sources and Data Issues: Bullying takes a toll on the entire school community, with potentially lasting harm. Nearly 30% (29.6%) of Michigan high schools students report experiencing bullying (MI YRBS 2017). For those who are bullied, the resulting emotional trauma can persist into adulthood. The link between bullying and suicide has also illuminated the need to recognize the damage bullying can inflict. At the school level, educational achievement can be impacted through reduced test scores when bullying is prevalent. A student who is stressed and feeling unsafe struggles to succeed academically. Educational success can be hampered by bullying experiences in school. But students who bully also suffer emotionally and academically, with a higher likelihood of defiant and delinquent behaviors, school drop-out and poor academic performance. A lack of respect for and understanding of others increases stress, violence and trauma. Addressing the environment that allows bullying to thrive means teaching all students the importance of empathy, respect for differences and managing emotions. Social emotional learning (SEL) incorporates the skills that serve to prevent bullying behavior. Teaching all students those skills arms them against participating, on any level, in bullying. The Michigan Model for Health™ (MMH) is a Pre-K-12, comprehensive school health education curriculum recognized by the Collaborative for Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL) as an evidence-based SEL program. Evaluators found in a 2011 randomized control study that students who received the MMH curriculum showed statistically significant positive changes, including better interpersonal communication skills, stronger social and emotional health skills, and less reported aggression in the past 30 days. SEL is a structured way to improve a wide range of students’ social and emotional competencies and impact bullying at the individual and peer levels.

Year: 2021

Unit Type: 100, Unit Number: Teacher implementation logs. Classroom teachers will complete implementation logs tracking the lessons taught from the Michigan Model for Healthâ„¢ Social and Emotional Health Module. The measure will reflect a cumulative count over time.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.