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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 11 (11 total).

7.1.1 The percentage of school districts participating in a child safety seat awareness campaign. (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase child safety seats for elementary age students/families.

Numerator: Number of districts distributing educational materials.

Denominator: Number of schools districts.

Significance: Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. But many of these deaths can be prevented. Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces serious and fatal injuries by more than half. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Six teens ages 16 to 19 die every day from motor vehicle injuries. Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash. Compared with other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Administrative data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of School Health Friday Beat newsletters per fiscal year with at least one injury prevention resource provided (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To have at least one injury prevention resource in each issue of the Friday Beat, to educate teachers, school administrators, and other interested individuals on injury prevention topics.

Numerator: Number of School Health Friday Beat bi-weekly newsletter issues per year that include at least one injury prevention resource.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents, both in Texas and the United States as a whole. School is one environment in which children spend a significant portion of their day, so this environment could definitely have an impact on injury risk. Both fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries are very costly; in addition to the burden of death and disability, childhood injuries can result in substantial economic costs, including medical costs for the child and lost work days for caregivers. In order to impact the number of injury-related hospital admissions per population ages birth to 19 years, teachers, school administrators, nurses, and other interested individuals need to increase their knowledge of the potential risks impacting this population at school, in the community, and at home, and be provided strategies to reduce the risk. This measure will ensure that injury prevention resources are included in each issue of the School Health Friday Beat newsletter.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Source: DSHS School Health MCHS is working with School Health to try to ensure that every issue of the Friday Beat newsletter includes at least one injury prevention resource. Approximately 25 newsletter issues will be written/distributed each year (issues are published every other week). The Friday Beat newsletter goes out each week to over 2,500 followers through their distribution list. School Health will provide MCHS with the numbers and topics of the injury prevention resources they include in their bi-weekly Friday Beat issues.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.1.2 Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Numerator: Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Unintentional poisoning killed 635 U.S. Children in 2014; almost 90% of them were teenagers, ages 10-19. In 2014 117,959 U.S. children visited emergency departments for unintentional poisoning-related injuries (WISQARS). Reducing the amount of prescription drugs in the home can reduce access to these drugs by children. Research indicates the high availability of prescription drugs in Tennessee is contributing to the addiction problem across the state. According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 70% of people who abused or misused prescription drugs got them from a friend or relative, either for free, by purchasing them, or by stealing them. People who abuse prescription drugs also obtain them from other sources including “pill mills,” or illegitimate pain clinics; prescription fraud; pharmacy theft; illegal online pharmacies; and “doctor shopping”. Some individuals who use prescription drugs for non-medical reasons believe these substances are safer than illicit drugs because they are prescribed by a physician and dispensed by a pharmacist. Communities that develop partnerships with schools, healthcare providers, pharmacists, law enforcement and other sectors to educate families about the importance of monitoring, securing, and properly disposing of prescription drugs can reduce access to unused prescription drugs and increase the perception of harm of the abuse of prescription drugs.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health Injury Prevention Program reports

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 93

7.2.1 The number of schools that were provided the Impact Teen Driver Presentations. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To grow the Impact Teen Driver Program in ND.

Numerator: The current number of schools that were provided the Impact Teen Driver presentations in ND.

Denominator: The number of schools that were provided Impact Teen Driver Presentations by 2022.

Significance: Childhood injuries continue to be a leading cause of death to children in North Dakota (ND). In 2014, non-fatal injury hospitalization rates for children ages one through nine were at a rate of 127.49 (down from 2013 - 140.75) per 100,000. As children get older and enter adolescence, hospitalization rates start to increase (ages 10-19) to 348.09 (up from 2013 – 322.29) per 100,000. Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teenagers; young drivers are twice as likely as adult drivers to be in a fatal crash. Motor vehicle crash injuries are preventable and implemented proven strategies can improve the safety of young drivers on the road. Establishing seat belt usage before and throughout adolescence will increase the chances of a teenager surviving future motor vehicle crashes. The three year aggregate rate from 2013-2015 for adolescent motor vehicle mortality for ages 15-19 is 21.02, which has decreased slightly from a rate of 22.66 (aggregate data from 2012-2014). The Impact Teen Drivers (ITD) program is an evidence-based program that uses engaging awareness and educational materials for teens, parents, teachers and health professionals. This curriculum facilitates engaging classroom discussion focused on reckless and distracted driving and the importance of making good decisions behind the wheel. From December 1, 2016 to the present, ND has reached 23 schools with the ITD presentations. Providing the ITD program in ND schools may lead teens, parents and community members to think differently about distracted and reckless driving. This different way of thinking may lead to behavior changes.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The number of presentations that are delivered in the schools is tracked by the entity that the NDDoH contracts with. http://www.impactteendrivers.org/ Note: The data is for the federal fiscal year October of the year to September.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50

7.2.1 The number of schools participating in the "Teens in the Driver Seat" program (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of schools participating in an evidence-based teen driver safety program.

Numerator: NA

Denominator: NA

Significance: Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. Teens in the Driver Seat® is a teen driven peer-to-peer educational program that focuses solely on traffic safety and addresses all major driving risks for this age group. Teens, along with a sponsor, help shape the program and are responsible for implementing it.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program Data, Nebraska Injury Prevention.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.2.1 Percentage of high school students who wear seatbelts (New Hampshire)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percent of high school students wearing seatbelts

Numerator: number of students reporting seatbelt use

Denominator: total number of students responding to this question on YRBS

Significance: Unintentional injuries among children and young adults up to age 24 are a significant cause of premature deaths and serious injuries, many of which have life-altering impacts. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of these injuries; many of these would be mitigated or even prevented if seatbelts were used consistently.

Data Sources and Data Issues: NH YRBS data (https://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline) YRBS is a self-reported survey and students may respond positively to questions about wearing a seatbelt because there is a law in NH requiring people under 18 to wear seatbelts. School participation in the survey is voluntary, so data is not captured from 100% of NH students. The number of students who do respond is considered high enough to be representative of the state as a whole, but data is not reliable at a sub-state level.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.2.1 Number of Teens in Cars campaigns (Washington)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: DOH will be able to measure the effects of its outreach among communities (specifically in schools) to promote safe driving among teens.

Numerator: Number of campaigns held in state

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Much of the work being conducted on injury prevention in this age group is being done through these safety campaigns. This measure will allow Washington to have better knowledge of the frequency of these interventions, as well as the numbers of students reached by them.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The source of these data is the Injury Prevention program tracking the number of grants offered per year, along with the grantee providing a report on how many children/families participated in the event.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.2.1 Number of schools that received training on evidence based suicide prevention programs (Missouri)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Missouri will increase the number of schools that received training on evidence based suicide prevention programs.

Numerator: Number of schools that received training on evidence based suicide prevention programs

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Suicide is an important public health problem. In the United States, decisions about whether deaths are listed as suicides on death certificates are usually made by a coroner or medical examiner. The definition of suicide is "death arising from an act inflicted upon oneself with the intent to kill oneself." In 2014, suicide is the third leading cause of death for ages 15-19 for Missouri and the second leading cause of death nationally. The suicide death rate in Missouri among youths aged 15-19 was 9.9 per 100,000, slightly higher than the national rate of 8.7 per 100,000.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MO DHSS Adolescent Health Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 2,000

7.2.1 Number of schools in the top ten crash rate counties (among ages 15-18) that conduct evidence-informed teen safe driving programming (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of schools in the top ten crash rate counties (among ages 15-18) that conduct evidence-informed teen safe driving programming

Numerator: Number of schools in the top ten crash rate counties that conduct evidence-informed teen safe driving programming

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Motor vehicle crash injuries are a leading cause of hospitalization among children in the United States. In 2014, over 840 adolescents ages 15-24 were hospitalized in Tennessee because of motor vehicle crashes. Research shows that in order for young drivers to remain collision-free, parents must model safe driving behaviors and invest in meaningful guided practice over a long period of time to turn these skills into good driving habits. It is our hope that new drivers will have a solid foundation to develop safe, collision-free driving habits that will last a lifetime through teen safe driving programming. The evidence-informed teen safe driving program can reduce risk and keep people safer on the road.

Data Sources and Data Issues: ReduceTNCrashes.org web based teen safe driving program reports

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 70

7.2.2 Percent of youth reporting connection to at least one caring adult (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percentage of youth reporting a connection to at least one caring adult, as a measure of positive youth development (PYD) and a protective factor against injury.

Numerator: Estimated number of youth in Texas (grades 9-12) reporting a connection to at least one caring adult during a specific year

Denominator: Total number of youth (grades 9-12) in Texas during a specific year

Significance: New research is showing that adolescents who have positive connections to at least one adult in their life have increased protective factors and are less likely to participate in risky behaviors that can lead to injury and death. Positive youth development (PYD) focuses on the development of relationships with caring adults, supportive relationships with parents, supportive peer networks, promoting positive connections to school, supportive communities, and opportunities to experiment in healthy ways.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Texas Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) Texas YRBSS is a school-based survey of representative samples of 9th through 12th grade students in Texas. The survey monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults. The YRBSS survey is conducted every two years. Starting with 2017 YRBSS data (which should be available in FY18), this estimate will be the percentage of youth who reported that they either ate dinner at home with parents or guardians 4 of the last 7 days, or that they felt comfortable seeking help from an adult other than their parents if they had an important question affecting their life Data Issues: All data collected by YRBSS are self-reported. Furthermore, response rates to the YRBSS are lower than ideal and declining. YRBSS findings are intended for population surveillance and have only limited generalizability to specific geographic subgroups such as counties or cities. In 2015, Texas YRBSS did not receive enough data for results to be considered representative of youth across the state, so 2013 YRBSS data were used as a baseline to estimate annual objectives. In the 2013 YRBSS, only information about whether youth ate dinner at home with parents/guardians 4 of the last 7 days was available.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.2.2 Number of schools through collaborative state funding implementing Sources of Strength (Colorado)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Implement Sources of Strength in 85 schools across Colorado by 2020.

Numerator: Number of schools through collaborative state funding implementing Sources of Strength

Denominator: Not applicable since ESM is a count.

Significance: Sources of Strength has been shown to increase school connectedness, which is a protective factor for bullying and youth suicide outcomes. Implementing Sources of Strength is an evidence-based strategy to try and decrease bullying and youth suicide outcomes in Colorado.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Sources of Strength, Office of Suicide Prevention, Communities that Care, any other partnerships supporting the implementation of Sources of Strength

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 200

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.