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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

13.2.1 Percent of children from public elementary schools who receive dental sealants through the Public Health School Sealant Program. (Northern Mariana Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: By 2020, increase the percentage of children ages 1 through 17 years old who had a preventive dental visit by 10%.

Numerator: Number of 2nd and 6th grade public school students who receive dental sealants.

Denominator: Number of children enrolled in 2nd and 6th grade students enrolled in the Public School System.

Significance: Studies have shown that poor oral health in children can result in adverse school performance and their success later in life. Children with poor oral health suffer from persistent dental pain, endurance of dental abscesses, inability to chew foods, embarrassment, and distraction from play and learning.

Data Sources and Data Issues: CHCC RPMS

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

13.2.1 # of students participating in Vermont's 802Smiles Network of School Dental Health Programs receiving oral health services (Vermont)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of children, ages 1 through 17, who had a preventive dental visit in the past year, and therefore reducing the risk of oral health disease across the lifespan.

Numerator: # of students participating in Vermont's 802Smiles Network of School Dental Health Programs receiving oral health services

Denominator: # of students participating in Vermont's 802Smiles Network of School Dental Health Programs receiving oral health services

Significance: Vermont’s 802Smiles Network of School Dental Health Programs helps to ensure that children have access to preventive, restorative and continuous oral health care. The 802Smiles Network includes school-linked programs (students are linked to local dental practices through care coordination), school-based programs (preventive dental care is provided on site), and school dental health clinics which offer both preventive and restorative dental care in a school setting. Receiving oral health services means that the student received dental care in a school-based program, in a dental van or at a dental office.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data source: Vermont oral health program records; no known data issues.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10,000

13.2.1 Number of students who have received a preventive dental screening through the SEAL! Michigan program (Michigan)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of students who have received a preventive dental screening within a school based dental program

Numerator: N/A - This is a count measure

Denominator: N/A - This is a count measure

Significance: A school-based dental program is an ideal environment to prevent dental decay across the population. This goal helps meet the Healthy People 2020 indicator for oral health, with the objective to increase the amount of dental screenings that are completed in children ages 1 to 17.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The SEAL! Michigan annual all grantee report will be used for the data source. Annual data are gathered each October at the end of the fiscal year and reports are developed by the following August. This timeframe could cause the annual indicator to be delayed by one year. In addition, the Sealant coordinator position and epidemiologist position are funded under the CDC cooperative agreement.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10,000

13.2.1 Number of children who received dental sealants in school-based settings through the Idaho Oral Health Program (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Top level: direct services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of children who receive dental sealants as a method to reduce dental caries.

Numerator: Number of children who received dental sealants in school-based settings through the Idaho Oral Health Program

Denominator: NA

Significance: Oral health is increasingly recognized as having overall health implications. Research has shown a link to diabetes, heart and lung disease, stroke, respiratory illnesses, and pre-term, low-birth weight infants. Childhood dental disease sets the stage for a lifetime of poor oral health and puts a financial burden on the family. Approximately 19% of Idaho children under the age of 18 experienced a toothache, decayed teeth, or unfilled cavities in the past 12 months, and approximately 20% did not receive any dental care in the past 12 months. Ninety-seven percent of Idaho is designated as a dental health professional shortage area. Because of this lack of access to dental care, it is imperative that the Idaho Oral Health Program continue focus on preventive dental care for children. To address the priority need to improve MCH population access to medical homes and linkage to dental care, the MCH Program will continue to fund the Idaho Oral Health Program’s contracts with the Public Health Districts (PHDs) for dental care among school-age children. In 2014, the PEW Charitable Trusts assigned the state of Idaho an “A” grade for protecting children from tooth decay with the application of dental sealants. Idaho was one of only five states to receive this distinguished grade. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015), dental sealants are a critical preventive dental service and can reduce decay by 60 to 80 percent in two years after application. Further, school-based dental sealant programs are a great way to reach children and result in cost-savings for families. All seven PHDs in Idaho provide dental sealants to elementary school children through School-Based/Linked Dental Sealant Clinics and two annual events focused on the education and application of dental sealants. Along with providing dental sealants, the PHDs also provided oral health screenings, fluoride varnish applications, oral health education, and dental home referrals as needed.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Idaho Oral Health Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

13.2.1 Number of children that receive dental sealants per school year. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of children receiving dental sealants through the school-based sealant program.

Numerator: Number of students receiving sealants per school year

Denominator: Not Applicable

Significance: Oral health is a vital component of overall health. People with limited access to preventive oral health services are at greater risk for oral disease. The burden of oral disease is not uniformly distributed throughout North Dakota (ND). Access to oral health services is an ongoing concern and challenge. Vulnerable and underserved populations face a variety of barriers to oral health care including transportation issues, lack of insurance or ability to pay for care, inability to take time off work to go to the dentist or transport their children, limited availability of providers accepting Medicaid and lack of understanding of the importance of good oral health and its impact on overall health. The limited oral public health infrastructure, particularly in rural counties and lower economically impacted state regions, provides limited options for families in need. The existing oral health safety-net facilities are overburdened and cannot take on more patients without expanding their infrastructure. Sealants in childhood are cited as one of the most cost-effective evidence-based practices of reducing the likelihood of tooth decay later in life. The Seal!ND is a program was established in ND in 2008 to increase access to preventive dental care to underserved populations. Public Health Hygienists administer the program and provide oral health screenings, oral health education, dental sealants, and fluoride varnish. Between 2008 and 2015, the Seal!ND program provided preventive oral health services to 2,893 children. The program will continue to expand targeting schools with 40 percent or more students enrolled in a free and reduced-fee lunch program.

Data Sources and Data Issues: North Dakota Department of Health – Oral Health Program – Seal!ND School-based Sealant Program Database. Note: The data is collected based on the school year (August through July).

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,995

13.2.1 Number of children provided with dental sealants through state program (Illinois)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Top level: direct services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To provide school aged children with dental sealants to protect their permanent teeth from decay

Numerator: # children provided dental sealants

Denominator: not applicable

Significance: Dental sealants are an important preventative oral health service for preventing dental decay on children’s permanent teeth. The Title V program provides funding to the IDPH Oral Health program to support dental services for children throughout Illinois, particularly those on Medicaid or without any dental insurance. This ESM will measure the number of children reached annually by this strategy. (Measure added July 2018)

Data Sources and Data Issues: IDPH Oral Health Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000,000

13.2.1 Number of children and youth provided with preventive oral health services through a SBHC. (District of Columbia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Top level: direct services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase oral health referrals among children and youth through the SBHCs. Increase SBHC oral health education and referrals for children and youth.

Numerator: Number of children and youth provided with preventive oral health services through a SBHC.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Oral healthcare remains the greatest unmet health need among youth. Insufficient access to oral health care and effective preventive services affects children’s health, education, and ability to prosper. Early dental visits teach children the importance of dental health, and increase the likelihood that they will seek dental care proactively throughout life. Adult family members who receive regular oral health care are more likely to take their children to a dentist and teach them appropriate health behaviors at home. Additionally, adults that seek regular oral health care are less likely to transmit tooth decay bacteria to their children. State Title V Maternal Child Health programs have long recognized the importance of improving the availability and quality of oral health services for children and their families. States monitor and guide service delivery to assure that all children have access to preventive oral health services. Strategies for promoting oral health include increasing the capacity of State oral health programs to provide school-based preventive services, monitor oral health epidemiologic trends, and implement programs that enhance the dental healthcare system. Here is an update for the data passage using the FY 2015 CMS-416 data: Oral Health: During Fiscal Year 2015, 59% of children ages 3-9 years that were enrolled in Medicaid for 90 or more continuous days received preventive dental care. Utilization was 51% among such children 10-18 years of age, however only 17% of enrolled children under 3 years of age utilized preventive dental services.

Data Sources and Data Issues: 1. DOH Oral Health Program 2. District of Columbia School Based Health Centers

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100,000

13.2.2 Percentage of children who received a consent form for the MDPH SEAL program who were screened by one of the program dental hygienists. (Massachusetts)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percent of children receiving oral health care in schools.

Numerator: Number of children who were screened by an MDPH SEAL dental hygienist

Denominator: Number of children who received a consent form for the SEAL program

Significance: The MDPH SEAL program is a school-based sealant program in which dental hygienists use portable dental equipment to provide screenings, education, dental sealants and fluoride, as well as referrals to a dental home, for children in need of restorative services. The rules and regulations governing the practice of dentistry in the Commonwealth (August 20, 2010) allow for a registered dental hygienist practicing in a public health setting to provide dental hygiene services, including placement of sealants, without first having a dentist examine the patient. This ESM is supported by evidence from the Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs review of NPM 13B that was completed in August 2017. The review found that there was moderate evidence of effectiveness of school-based oral health interventions. Two studies that focused on access to school-based oral health care (e.g., screening and referral) were: - Kaplan DW, Brindis CD, Phibbs SL, Melinkovich P, Naylor K, Ahlstrand K. A comparison study of an elementary school-based health center: effects on health care access and use. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1999;153(3):235-243. - Chalmers D. An enhanced screening and referral program: a community dental hygiene pilot project. Probe. 2003;37(1):35-37.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MDPH SEAL database. Data is collected by dental hygienists on site and enter into an Access database. Consent forms are distributed to all schools who agree to participate in the program. Whether or not schools participate is determined by the school district and whether or not there are other sealant programs in those areas. Some schools only distribute consent forms to certain grades, which is determined by the school administration.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

13.2.2 Number of children ages 1-17 years receiving preventive dental care from a dentist. (District of Columbia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Top level: direct services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase oral health prevention among children between the ages of 1-13 years.

Numerator: Number of children ages 1-13 years receiving preventive dental care from a dentist.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Oral healthcare remains the greatest unmet health need among youth. Insufficient access to oral health care and effective preventive services affects children’s health, education, and ability to prosper. Early dental visits teach children the importance of dental health, and increase the likelihood that they will seek dental care proactively throughout life. Adult family members who receive regular oral health care are more likely to take their children to a dentist and teach them appropriate health behaviors at home. Additionally, adults that seek regular oral health care are less likely to transmit tooth decay bacteria to their children. State Title V Maternal Child Health programs have long recognized the importance of improving the availability and quality of oral health services for children and their families. States monitor and guide service delivery to assure that all children have access to preventive oral health services. Strategies for promoting oral health include increasing the capacity of State oral health programs to provide school-based preventive services, monitor oral health epidemiologic trends, and implement programs that enhance the dental healthcare system. Here is an update for the data passage using the FY 2015 CMS-416 data: Oral Health: During Fiscal Year 2015, 59% of children ages 3-9 years that were enrolled in Medicaid for 90 or more continuous days received preventive dental care. Utilization was 51% among such children 10-18 years of age, however only 17% of enrolled children under 3 years of age utilized preventive dental services.

Data Sources and Data Issues: 1. DOH Oral Health Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 14,000

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.