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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

ESM 4.1 Percent of the 10-Steps to Successful Breastfeeding training slots utilized by staff and providers from the state's birthing hospitals (Georgia)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/4-5.php). Find other NPM 4 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: By 2025, have at least 85% of the 330 available 10-Steps to Successful Breastfeeding training slots utilized annually by staff and providers from the state's birthing hospitals.

Numerator: Number of training slots utilized by staff and providers from the state's birthing hopsitals

Denominator: Total number of available training slots (330)

Significance: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends all infants (including premature and sick newborns) exclusively breastfeed for about six months as human milk supports optimal growth and development by providing all required nutrients during that time. Breastfeeding strengthens the immune system, reduces respiratory infections, gastrointestinal illness, and SIDS, and promotes neurodevelopment. Breastfed children may also be less likely to develop diabetes, childhood obesity, and asthma. Maternal benefits include reduced postpartum blood loss due to oxytocin release and possible protective effects against breast and ovarian cancer.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Women's Health 5-STAR Initiative Program Data

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 4.1 Number of professionals and parents who attend annual Idaho Breastfeeding Summit. (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/4-5.php). Find other NPM 4 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of Idahoans who receive information about best practices related to breastfeeding through attendance at the annual Idaho Breastfeeeding Summit.

Numerator: Number of professionals and parents who attend annual Idaho Breastfeeding Summit.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The MCH leadership team will support an annual statewide breastfeeding summit to provide healthcare providers training on best practices for breastfeeding initiation and duration. The Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition (KBC), established the Community Supporting Breastfeeding (CBS) program, which incorporates varied approaches that assist breastfeeding mothers, promote initiation and duration of breastfeeding by including the formation of a local breastfeeding coalition, offering a course for healthcare providers to learn about supporting breastfeeding, and provide resources and information to reduce barriers and increase the perception of breastfeeding (Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs [AMCHP], 2016). Program participants indicated that the coalition cultivated engagement, leadership development, and community support, as well as increased involvement from organizations and government officials that support and advocate towards breastfeeding by enhancing the sustainability and engagement of existing programs, and allocating breastfeeding coalitions in areas where they are not provided (AMCHP, 2016). Additionally, Colorado has had success in increasing breastfeeding rates through statewide training of hospital personnel and informing parents about beneficial breastfeeding practices through Local Public Health agencies such as Women, Infants and Children (WIC) (AMCHP, 2012). Colorado experienced notable increases in breastfeeding initiation and duration rates following the five-key breastfeeding strategy, Colorado Can Do 5, which offers five beneficial breastfeeding practices to hospitals and medical centers (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 2011).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Idaho Breastfeeding Coalition

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 1,000

ESM 4.1 Number of health care providers trained in breastfeeding support (Oregon)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/4-5.php). Find other NPM 4 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the availability of breastfeeding support from professionals.

Numerator: Number of health care providers such as community health workers, nurses, dietitians, physicians, trained in breastfeeding support

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Health care providers play a critical role in breastfeeding initiation and continuation. While lack of support from health care providers has been identified as a major barrier to breastfeeding, support and encouragement from health care providers is one of the most important interventions in helping women breastfeed. Families need comprehensive breastfeeding support and lactation care from trained, qualified providers. A variety of trained care providers may include community health workers, doulas, nurses, dietitians, physicians and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant providers. Supporting training of the public health workforce who serve women and their infants will ensure a network of skilled lactation support throughout the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Grantee annual report on strategy measures

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 200

ESM 4.2 Percentage of providers and health educators receiving breastfeeding TA trainings. (American Samoa)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/4-5.php). Find other NPM 4 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: 1. Increase percentage of breastfeeding mothers by 5% in 2024. 2. Increase by 5%, 6 months infants who exclusively breastfeed in 2024.

Numerator: Number of providers and health educators receiving breastfeeding TA training at least once a year.

Denominator: Total number of providers and health educators serving perinatal population.

Significance: Breastfeeding has many health benefits for both the mother and infant. Breast milk contains all the nutrients an infant needs in the first six months of life. Breastfeeding protects against diarrhoea and common childhood illnesses such as pneumonia, and may also have longer-term health benefits, such as reducing the risk of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence. Provision of mother’s breast milk to infants within one hour of birth is referred to as “early initiation of breastfeeding” and ensures that the infant receives the colostrum, or “first milk”, which is rich in protective factors. Current evidence indicates that skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant shortly after birth helps to initiate early breastfeeding and increases the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding for one to four months of life as well as the overall duration of breastfeeding. Infants placed in early skin-to-skin contact with their mother also appear to interact more with their mothers and cry less. Reviving the Breastfeeding Coalition to help support providers and breastfeeding mothers is very critical to meeting these goals. A breastfeeding champion within the hospital is also critical to reengaging medical staff in supporting the Baby Friendly Hospital initiatives.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH Title V

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 4.5 Percent of health care providers who complete 20-hour lactation education training (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/4-5.php). Find other NPM 4 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the percent of health care providers who enroll and complete 20-hour lactation education training

Numerator: Number of health care providers who complete 20-hour lactation education training

Denominator: Number of health care providers who enroll in 20-hour lactation education training

Significance: Health care providers play a crucial role in breastfeeding promotion and support, influencing a woman’s decision to breastfeed and/or her desire to continue. However, some providers lack the skills needed to assist with breastfeeding issues. Continued lactation education opportunities can improve a providers’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards lactation care.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia. Accessed through http://www.scitent.com or https://bfconsortium.org

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.