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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

4.1 The number of health providers participating in certified lactation counselors training who are minority women. (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the number minority representation in consulting in order to increase the diversity of women who successfully breastfeed.

Numerator: NA

Denominator: NA

Significance: Breastfeeding is beneficial to almost all mothers and infants, but the benefits may be significantly greater for minority women. Minority women are disproportionately affected by adverse health outcomes, which may improve with breastfeeding. Relative to white women in the United States, African American and Hispanic women have increased rates of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Research suggests that breastfeeding may reduce a mother's risk of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program data.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 15

4.1 Cumulative number of childcare providers that receive training on the Ten Steps to Breastfeeding Child Care Centers (Wisconsin)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the number of childcare providers that receive Ten Steps to Breastfeeding Child Care Centers Resource Center training

Numerator: Cumulative number of childcare providers (individuals) that receive safe sleep training on the Ten Steps to Breastfeeding Child Care Centers Resource Center

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: Training childcare providers on the the Ten Steps to Breastfeeding Child Care Centers will increase the likelihood that infants are breastfed.

Data Sources and Data Issues: REDCap; 2016 data will be available early 2017

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

4.2 Number of professionals and parents who attend annual Idaho Breastfeeding Summit. (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of Idahoans who receive information about best practices related to breastfeeding through attendance at the annual Idaho Breastfeeeding Summit.

Numerator: Number of professionals and parents who attend annual Idaho Breastfeeding Summit.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The MCH leadership team will support an annual statewide breastfeeding summit to provide healthcare providers training on best practices for breastfeeding initiation and duration. The Kansas Breastfeeding Coalition (KBC), established the Community Supporting Breastfeeding (CBS) program, which incorporates varied approaches that assist breastfeeding mothers, promote initiation and duration of breastfeeding by including the formation of a local breastfeeding coalition, offering a course for healthcare providers to learn about supporting breastfeeding, and provide resources and information to reduce barriers and increase the perception of breastfeeding (Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs [AMCHP], 2016). Program participants indicated that the coalition cultivated engagement, leadership development, and community support, as well as increased involvement from organizations and government officials that support and advocate towards breastfeeding by enhancing the sustainability and engagement of existing programs, and allocating breastfeeding coalitions in areas where they are not provided (AMCHP, 2016). Additionally, Colorado has had success in increasing breastfeeding rates through statewide training of hospital personnel and informing parents about beneficial breastfeeding practices through Local Public Health agencies such as Women, Infants and Children (WIC) (AMCHP, 2012). Colorado experienced notable increases in breastfeeding initiation and duration rates following the five-key breastfeeding strategy, Colorado Can Do 5, which offers five beneficial breastfeeding practices to hospitals and medical centers (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 2011).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Idaho Breastfeeding Coalition

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

4.2 Number of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and/ or peer networks that were provided the Secrets of Baby Behavior (SBB) training (Connecticut)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of FQHCs/peer networks that were trained in the Secrets of Baby Behavior to increase the percent of infants breastfed exclusively through 6 months.

Numerator: The # of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and/ or peer networks that were trained in the Secrets of Baby Behavior (SBB)

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Through CDC 1305 grant funding the Department will continue to partner with a training consultant from UConn Health Center for Public Health and Health Policy to provide staff at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and various peer support networks such as Breastfeeding USA, Nurturing Families and the La Leche League access to the Secrets of Baby Behavior (SBB) training. Resources allow up to 2 FQHC’s and at least 1 peer support network. A webinar was conducted in December 2015 in partnership with CT Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (CT-AAP) to expose the hard-to-reach provider population with SBB messages.

Data Sources and Data Issues: There are 17 FQHC’s in CT. Federal funding is secured through 2018 to support this initiative.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 17

4.3 Number of health care providers trained in breastfeeding support (Oregon)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the availability of breastfeeding support from professionals.

Numerator: Number of health care providers such as community health workers, nurses, dietitians, physicians, trained in breastfeeding support

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Health care providers play a critical role in breastfeeding initiation and continuation. While lack of support from health care providers has been identified as a major barrier to breastfeeding, support and encouragement from health care providers is one of the most important interventions in helping women breastfeed. Families need comprehensive breastfeeding support and lactation care from trained, qualified providers. A variety of trained care providers may include community health workers, doulas, nurses, dietitians, physicians and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant providers. Supporting training of the public health workforce who serve women and their infants will ensure a network of skilled lactation support throughout the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Grantee annual report on strategy measures

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 200

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.