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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

4.1 Percent of live births occurring in Baby-Friendly hospitals (Illinois)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent of births occurring in hospitals providing optimal lactation support

Numerator: # live births in Baby-Friendly Hospitals

Denominator: # live births in Illinois Hospitals

Significance: Lactation support and breastfeeding-friendly policies are essentially components for helping new mothers initiate and maintain breastfeeding. The Baby-Friendly Initiative is a process that certifies hospital facilities as having the necessaries policies and supports in place to promote breastfeeding for all infants. For many years, only a handful of the approximately 120 Illinois birthing hospitals were Baby-Friendly, but increased encouragement for hospitals to pursue this designation over the last 5-10 years has slowly begun to expand the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the state. Prior to 2015, there were only 4 Baby-Friendly hospitals in Illinois. The number of additional hospitals that were designated as Baby-Friendly in the following years were: 3 in 2015, 8 in 2016, 4 in 2017, and 5 in 2018 (as of July). The total number of Illinois Baby-Friendly Hospitals now stands at 24, and additional hospitals are in the middle of completing the designation process. The full list of Baby-Friendly hospitals in Illinois is available at: https://www.babyfriendlyusa.org/find-facilities/designated-facilities--by-state. This measure will track the percent of Illinois live births occurring in Baby-Friendly hospitals over time. It is related to Healthy People 2020 objective MICH-24: Increase the proportion of live births that occur in facilities that provide recommended care for lactating mothers and their babies. (Measure added July 2018 when NPM #4 was added to Illinois' selections)

Data Sources and Data Issues: CDC Breastfeeding Report Card, Baby-Friendly USA

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Percent of Baby-Friendly designated birthing hospitals in Michigan (Michigan)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By increasing the number of Michigan birthing hospitals with Baby-Friendly designation, the proportion of live births that occur in Michigan birthing hospitals that provide recommended care for lactating mothers and their babies will increase

Numerator: Number of Michigan birthing hospitals with Baby-Friendly designation

Denominator: Number of Michigan birthing hospitals

Significance: Baby-Friendly designated birthing hospitals and centers 1) promote breastfeeding as the best method of infant feeding; 2) implement evidence-based practices to support breastfeeding and lactation; 3) facilitate informed health care decision-making for mothers and families; 4) ensure health care delivery that is sensitive to cultural and social diversity, 5) protect mothers and families from false or misleading product promotion and advertising, and 6) educate parents on safe and appropriate methods for formula mixing, handling, storage, and feeding when a mother has chosen not to breastfeed or has chosen to supplement. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a global program launched by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund in 1991 to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that provide the best level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding. Baby-Friendly designation is built on the implementation of Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, which empowers birthing facilities to examine maternity care policies and procedures, requires training and skill building for all levels of staff, and involves the development of quality assurance mechanisms within all aspects of maternity care operations. Baby-Friendly designated birthing hospitals and centers support healthy outcomes for both baby and mom, and can help to reduce breastfeeding disparities, especially within communities of color and low socioeconomic status communities.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. (BFUSA)

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Percent of Arkansas birthing hospitals aware of the ADH Baby Friendly Hospital Toolkit (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase awareness of the ADH Baby Friendly Hospital Toolkit among Arkansas birthing hospitals

Numerator: Number of Arkansas birthing hospitals educated about purpose and use of the Baby Friendly Hospital Toolkit

Denominator: Number of Arkansas birthing hospitals

Significance: Despite the wealth of information about the benefits of breastfeeding, Arkansas's rates consistently lag behind national rates and Healthy People 2020 goals. In order to improve breastfeeding initiation and maintenance rates, the ADH developed a hospital-focused toolkit that includes important information for expectant mothers to learn in the prenatal period as well as breastfeeding support literature and information about storage and handling of breast milk, hunger cues, skin-to-skin care. The toolkit also includes example policies and position statements as well as literature from the field.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program information

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.1 % of 10 Step compliant or designated Baby-friendly hospitals (Vermont)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Promote optimal infant health and development, by increasing breastfeeding education and supports at birthing hospitals

Numerator: # of 10 Step compliant or designated Baby-friendly hospitals

Denominator: # of Vermont birth hospitals

Significance: Birth hospital policies and practices significantly impact whether a woman chooses to start breastfeeding and how long she continues to breastfeed.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data source: program-level data; no known data issues

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Number of Gift designated facilities (Louisiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of hospitals implementing evidence-based policies and practices aligned with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative’s Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding.

Numerator: This is a count of Gift designated hospitals.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Increase in the number of state level designated birthing facilities should lead to increase in best practices for breastfeeding maternity care. Breastfeeding rates are higher in Gift designated than non-designated facilities.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data derived from the Gift Website www.thegiftla.org and program files. The goal for 2017 is 30 designated facilities. As of January 2017, there were 30 designated facilities.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Number of Baby Friendly Hospitals (Minnesota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of Baby Friendly Hospitals in Minnesota.

Numerator: Number of Minnesota Hospitals that have completed the 10-steps to becoming Baby Friendly

Denominator: Not Applicable

Significance: Most births in Minnesota occur in hospital settings, but hospital practices and policies in maternity settings can undermine maternal and infant health by creating barriers to supporting a mother's decision to breastfeed. There is an abundance of scientific evidence that associates breastfeeding with lower risks for many diseases and improved health outcomes for both mothers and babies. Breastfeeding is an important mechanism for the continued normal development of the infant. Under normal circumstances, with the correct information and the right supports in place, most women who choose to breastfeed are able to successfully achieve their goal. Results from the 2009 CDC survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey show that, on average, U.S. hospitals scored only 65 out of 100 on an overall measure of breastfeed related maternity care. When hospitals become Baby-Friendly, they have all the tools to give all mothers the information, confidence, and skills necessary to successfully initiative and continue to breastfed their babies.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Baby Friendly USA Website - https://www.babyfriendlyusa.org/find-facilities/designated-facilities--by-state

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Increase the Percentage of Births in Baby Friendly Hospitals (New Jersey)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the delivery of babies in Baby Friendly hospitals which will increase breastfeeding rates statewide.

Numerator: Births in Baby Friendly hospitals

Denominator: Total New Jersey Births

Significance: Breastfeeding is universally accepted as the optimal way to nourish and nurture infants, and it is recommended that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first six months. Breastfeeding is a cost-effective preventive intervention with far-reaching benefits for mothers and babies and significant cost savings for health providers and employers. Breastfeeding provides superior nutrition, prevents disease and enhances infant development. Increasing Baby Friendly hospitals is an evidence-based strategy to increase breastfeeding. Breastfeeding data at the individual infant level could be combined with hospital level including mPINC data and Baby Friendly status to provide more information on the policies and practices that promote breastfeeding.

Data Sources and Data Issues: New Jersey VIP Birth Certificate System

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.1 Breastfeeding support assessment findings available (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase availability of data to inform public health strategies for breastfeeding support.

Numerator: Yes: One or more reports of assessment findings related to breastfeeding support is produced and made available to the public via the DSHS website annually. No: No reports of assessment findings related to breastfeeding support are produced and made

Denominator: N/A

Significance: One of the Healthy People 2020 objectives (MICH-21) focuses on increasing the proportion of infants who are breastfed. In addition, the U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding calls for action in research and surveillance to strengthen capacity for conducting research on breastfeeding, and to develop a monitoring system to improve tracking of breastfeeding rates as well as policies and environmental factors known to affect breastfeeding. Assessment activities provide rich information to inform the strategic direction of breastfeeding programming and to evaluate the impact of programmatic efforts, allowing for ongoing monitoring and quality improvement.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: DSHS website DSHS has multiple breastfeeding assessment sources, including WIC programmatic data, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, the Texas Hospital Association Survey, the Texas birth certificate, the Newborn Screening Demographic Form, the biennial Texas WIC Infant Feeding Practices Survey, and targeted qualitative studies of knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and experiences. DSHS has funded research related to breastfeeding experiences and practices in hospitals, worksites, public, and child care settings, as well as a Baby-Friendly Hospital cost-analysis. Data Issues: None anticipated.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

4.1 3.1.1 Number of birthing hospitals that participate in the 5-STAR Hospital Initiative (Georgia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of birthing hospitals that participate in the 5-STAR Hospital Initiative

Numerator: Number of birthing hospitals participating in the 5-STAR Hospital Initiative

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: The health effects of breastfeeding are well recognized. Breast milk is uniquely suited to the human infant’s nutritional needs and is a live substance with unparalleled properties that protect against a host of illnesses and diseases for both mothers and children. Breast milk promotes sensory and cognitive development, and protects the infant against infectious and chronic diseases. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces infant mortality due to common childhood illnesses such as diarrhea or pneumonia, and helps for a quicker recovery during illness. These effects can be measured in resource-poor and affluent societies (Kramer M et al Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial (PROBIT): A randomized trial in the Republic of Belarus. Journal of the American Medical Association, 2001, 285(4): 413-420). The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program that was launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 1991 to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding.Becoming a Baby-Friendly facility is a comprehensive, detailed and thorough journey toward excellence in providing evidence-based, maternity care with the goal of achieving optimal infant feeding outcomes and mother/baby bonding. It compels facilities to examine, challenge and modify longstanding policies and procedures. It requires training and skill building among all levels of staff. Georgia's 5-STAR Initiative models the Baby-Friendly Initiative encouraging 5 of the 10 steps towards a baby-friendly designation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Women's Health 5-STAR Initiative Program Data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 80

4.2 Worksite lactation policy: Number of worksites that have created a lactation policy that complies with federal standards (Utah)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of worksites that create a lactation policy that complies with federal standards.

Numerator: Number of worksites with a policy

Denominator: N/A/ (Number of worksites with a policy)

Significance: For infants not breastfeeding, there is an associated increased risk of infant morbidity and mortality and significantly higher risk of many diseases including diabetes, obesity, leukemia, SIDS, NEC, etc. Duration rates are greatly affected by mothers returning to work to businesses that are not meeting the federal workplace accommodation law. Policies must be in place and implemented to provide an environment that is conducive to supporting breastfeeding women. Advantages of breastfeeding are indisputable. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all infants (including premature and sick newborns) exclusively breastfeed for about six months as human milk supports optimal growth and development by providing all required nutrients during that time. Breastfeeding strengthens the immune system, improves normal immune response to certain vaccines, offers possible protection from allergies, and reduces probability of SIDS. Research demonstrates breastfed children may be less likely to develop juvenile diabetes; and may have a lower risk of developing childhood obesity, and asthma; and tend to have fewer dental cavities throughout life. The bond of a nursing mother and child is stronger than any other human contact. A woman's ability to meet her child’s nutritional needs improves confidence and bonding with the baby and reduces feelings of anxiety and post natal depression. Increased release of oxytocin while breastfeeding, leads to a reduction in post-partum hemorrhage and quicker return to a normal sized uterus over time, mothers who breastfeed may be less likely to develop breast, uterine and ovarian cancer and have a reduced risk of developing osteoporosis.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Healthy Utah Worksite Assessment Survey

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 999

4.2 3.1.2 Number of Train-the-Trainer workshops conducted (Georgia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: increase the number of Train-the-Trainer workshops conducted from 0 to 6

Numerator: Number of Train-the-Trainer workshops conducted

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: The health effects of breastfeeding are well recognized. Breast milk is uniquely suited to the human infant’s nutritional needs and is a live substance with unparalleled properties that protect against a host of illnesses and diseases for both mothers and children. Breast milk promotes sensory and cognitive development, and protects the infant against infectious and chronic diseases. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces infant mortality due to common childhood illnesses such as diarrhea or pneumonia, and helps for a quicker recovery during illness. These effects can be measured in resource-poor and affluent societies (Kramer M et al Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial (PROBIT): A randomized trial in the Republic of Belarus. Journal of the American Medical Association, 2001, 285(4): 413-420). The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program that was launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 1991 to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding.Becoming a Baby-Friendly facility is a comprehensive, detailed and thorough journey toward excellence in providing evidence-based, maternity care with the goal of achieving optimal infant feeding outcomes and mother/baby bonding. It compels facilities to examine, challenge and modify longstanding policies and procedures. It requires training and skill building among all levels of staff. Georgia's 5-STAR Initiative models the Baby-Friendly Initiative encouraging 5 of the 10 steps towards a baby-friendly designation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Women's Health Program Data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 6

4.3 Number of Texas birthing facilities that receive information and technical assistance to facilitate integration of the WHO/UNICEF Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the proportion of births occurring in facilities providing recommended support for lactating mothers and their babies.

Numerator: Number of Texas birthing facilities receiving information and technical assistance annually through the DSHS continuum of Ten Step Initiatives to increase practices supportive of breastfeeding.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding calls for health care to ensure that maternity practices are fully supportive of breastfeeding, and to develop systems to guarantee continuity of skilled lactation support between hospitals and health care settings in the community. Evidence-based guidelines for quality maternity practices, including the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and related practices, are well-established and widely promoted by health authorities but are inconsistently implemented. The Ten Steps are an evidence-based bundle of practices shown to improve infant feeding outcomes across all races, ethnicities and income levels, to increase continuity and, ultimately, to result in improved short- and long-term maternal and infant health outcomes. One of the Healthy People 2020 objectives (MICH-24) focuses on increasing the proportion of live births that occur in facilities that provide recommended care for lactating mothers and their babies. This is measured by the number of births occurring in facilities that have achieved the Baby Friendly Hospital designation by demonstrating full implementation of the Ten Steps. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative is an international WHO/UNICEF program that is administered in the United States by Baby-Friendly USA. Other Healthy people 2020 objectives associated with this measure include increasing the proportion of infants who are breastfed (MICH-21) and reducing the proportion of breastfed newborns who receive formula supplementation within the first 2 days of life (MICH-23).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: DSHS Infant Feeding Workgroup DSHS provides a continuum of Ten Step initiatives to support birthing facilities in implementing maternity care practices supportive of breastfeeding. These efforts include: - Engaging administrative and clinical decision makers in Ten Step improvement through the Right from the Start awareness campaign and through one-day hospital breastfeeding summits. - Providing a robust slate of online and in-person education offerings and resources - Recognizing facilities’ incremental achievement with Texas Ten Step designation if at least 85% of DSHS Texas Ten Step criteria are addressed in policy, including designation as a Texas Mother Friendly Worksite. All Texas Baby-Friendly Hospitals, to date, are engaged in the TTS Program through which they continue to receive ongoing support for improvement in and implementation of the Ten Steps. - Accelerating integration of the Ten Steps and to support continuity of care from the hospital to the community through the Texas Ten Step Star Achiever Initiative. The initiative offers a learning collaborative, training, community partner meetings, ongoing technical assistance, and tools for facilities to improve policies and processes that impact breastfeeding outcomes. - Coordinating with national partners to support Texas birthing facilities that participate in national collaborative breastfeeding improvement initiatives, currently including facilities recruited for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Communities and Hospitals Advancing Maternity Practices (CHAMPS) initiative to reduce disparities in breastfeeding, and facilities that were recruited for the CDC/Abt Associates Enhance Maternity Practices (EMPower) for Breastfeeding initiative, the CDC’s newest collaborative to increase the number of birthing facilities that are designated as Baby-Friendly. Data Issues: None anticipated.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 500

4.4 Percent of Arkansas birthing hospitals with breastfeeding policies (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of Arkansas birthing hospitals with breastfeeding policies

Numerator: Number of Arkansas birthing hospitals with breastfeeding policies

Denominator: Number of Arkansas birthing hospitals

Significance: Despite the wealth of information about the benefits of breastfeeding, Arkansas's rates consistently lag behind national rates and Healthy People 2020 goals. In order to improve breastfeeding initiation and maintenance rates, the ADH developed a hospital-focused toolkit that includes important information for expectant mothers to learn in the prenatal period as well as breastfeeding support literature and information about storage and handling of breast milk, hunger cues, skin-to-skin care. The toolkit also includes example policies and position statements as well as literature from the field.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program information

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

4.4 Number of worksites that have created a lactation policy that complies with federal standards. (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of worksites that have created a lactation policy that complies with federal standards

Numerator: Number of worksites with a policy

Denominator: N/A

Significance: For infants not breastfeeding, there is associated increased risk of infant mortality and morbidity and significantly higher risk of any diseases including diabetes, obesity, SIDS, etc. Duration rates are greatly affected by mothers returning to work to businesses that are not meeting the federal workplace accommodation law. Policies must be in place and implemented to provide an environment that is conducive to supporting breastfeeding mothers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Non-Communicable Disease Consortium Breastfeeding Action Group Assessment Survey

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 99

4.4 Number of Hospitals Participating in the Wyoming 5-Steps to Breastfeeding Success Program (Wyoming)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of hospitals participating in the Wyoming 5-Steps to Breastfeeding Success Mini-Grant Program or Hospital Recognition Program

Numerator: Number of hospitals participating in the Wyoming 5-Steps to Breastfeeding Success Program

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Supporting changes to hospital polices can significantly impact breastfeeding initiation and duration rates for mother's who deliver in the hospital. Wyoming is promoting it's 5-Steps to Breastfeeding Success Program which is modeled off the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and the Colorado Can Do 5 Initiative. The Women and Infant Program will support hospitals as they engage in policy change and quality improvement efforts around these five steps to improve the breastfeeding rates among the new moms they serve.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Survey of hospital policies and grant reporting

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 26

4.4 Number of employers who receive information and technical assistance on Mother-Friendly breastfeeding support policies (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To reduce work-related barriers to breastfeeding initiation, continuation, and exclusivity by providing employers with information and assistance on recommended practices for establishment of worksite lactation support policies and environments.

Numerator: Number of Texas employers receiving information and technical assistance annually through the Texas Mother-Friendly Worksite Technical Assistance and Support Program

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Healthy People 2020 objective MICH-22 is to increase the proportion of employers with worksite lactation support programs. The U.S. Surgeon General calls for employers to have high-quality employee lactation support programs and to work toward other efforts to reduce breastfeeding barriers for working mothers. Employment barriers to breastfeeding, including early return to work, lack of support in the workplace and difficulties with pumping when separated, remain the biggest barriers for breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. A recent statewide assessment showed many Texas employers did not perceive a need for formal support of breastfeeding and did not hear of the need from employees. Many working mothers reported fear (e.g. job insecurity) of asking employers for basic worksite lactation supports. Mothers report barriers to finding clean, private spaces and taking lactation breaks sufficient to maintain milk supply. Women reported that a written worksite policy providing flexible scheduling and access to clean, private space for lactation breaks, such as recommended by the Texas Mother-Friendly Worksite Program, would enable them to confidently approach their employer for these basic supports and would help balance work commitments and personal breastfeeding goals. Supportive worksite policies and practices increase a mother’s ability to establish and maintain lactation even when separated from her infant and can improve infant feeding outcomes while also benefiting employers through cost savings of up to $3 for every $1 invested by employers. Savings are realized through increased employee retention, loyalty and productivity, reduced absenteeism, and reduced health care costs. Texas women have limited access to supportive workplace policies and programs that allow them to continue to breastfeed after returning to work. Many employers are now required by law to provide basic lactation support in the workplace.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: MFW-TASP quarterly reports Data from the DSHS Mother-Friendly Worksite Technical Assistance and Support Program (MFW-TASP) are used for this ESM. The DSHS Mother-Friendly Worksite Program provides information, technical assistance, tools, resources and recognition to encourage and support employers to establish and maintain comprehensive, high-quality lactation support programs for employees who are separated from their infants during the workday. This program tracks the number of worksites that receive technical assistance, the type of assistance provided, and the number of these worksites that meet or exceed minimum program criteria and become designated as Texas Mother-Friendly Worksites. Data Issues: None anticipated

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

4.5 DSHS Infant Feeding Position Statement reviewed, revised and updated in FY2019 (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To provide up-to-date, evidence-informed direction for DSHS programs about infant nutrition and feeding and to make explicit to interested partners and stakeholders the public health importance of breastfeeding and the DSHS position on infant feeding

Numerator: Yes: The DSHS Position Statement on Infant Feeding is reviewed and updated in FY2019 No: The DSHS Position Statement on Infant Feeding is not reviewed and updated in FY2019

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Breastfeeding is a public health priority. Suboptimal breastfeeding is associated with poor maternal and child health and developmental outcomes, including increased risk of acute and chronic morbidities, increased risk of infant death, and premature maternal and child deaths due to increased risk of several chronic diseases. Suboptimal breastfeeding results in an estimated annual loss in the U.S. of >$17 billion in excess maternal and child health care costs and lost productivity. While the vast majority of Texas mothers choose to breastfeed, fewer than half will breastfeed for as long as they want to. The U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding calls for action in public health infrastructure to improve leadership on the promotion and support of breastfeeding. DSHS offers a comprehensive program of breastfeeding support, closely aligned with the U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding, to address barriers to breastfeeding across sectors including health care, employment, and the community. In addition, one of the Healthy People 2020 objectives focuses on increasing the proportion of infants who are breastfed (MICH-21). An explicitly communicated position on infant feeding provides an explanation, justification, and recommended course of action to DSHS programs and other interested stakeholders to facilitate clarity, consistency, alignment and synergy in DSHS’ approach to matters related to infant nutrition and feeding.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: DSHS Infant Feeding Workgroup All breastfeeding support activities are coordinated through the DSHS Infant Feeding Workgroup (IFW). The IFW seeks to address the determinants and barriers to breastfeeding within a comprehensive strategic action framework for the coordination, integration, and evaluation of breastfeeding support messaging, programs, and policies. DSHS has developed and leveraged strategic, data-informed planning, intensive cross-program coordination, and an integrated system of partnerships to systematically increase breastfeeding support and move the needle on breastfeeding outcomes. The IFW will complete a review of current scientific knowledge and needs assessment findings to revise the DSHS Position Statement on Infant Feeding. The statement was last revised in 2010, and this version of the statement is currently available online at http://dshs.texas.gov/wichd/lactate/position.shtm. Data Issues: None anticipated

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.