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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

12.1 Use of evidenced-based health care transition tools in public health and FQHC facilities. (Virgin Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the use of an evidenced-based health care transition tool for transition readiness assessment in public health and FQHC facilities.

Numerator: Number of public health and FQHC facilities using an evidenced-based health care transition toll for transition readiness assessments.

Denominator: Number of public health and FQHC facilities providing transition services for adolescents with and without special health care needs.

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Title V Program; FQHCs

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 4

12.1 Percent of PCP practices of transition age children (12 through 17) receiving CHC services that participate in the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition self-assessment (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the number of Arkansas Medicaid Pediatric & Family Practice providers who develop a Transition Policy within their practice by implementing the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition. Related to Disability and Health (DH) Objective 5

Numerator: The number of PCP practices of transition age children (12 through 17) receiving CHC services that participate in the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition self-assessment

Denominator: The number of PCP practices of transition age children (12 through 17) receiving Children with Chronic Health Conditions (CHC) services

Significance: Will enable CSHCN providers with the ability to be able to assist and teach families the Six Core Elements of Transition "to optimize their ability to assume adult roles & activities to ensure that health care services are available in an uninterrupted manner. The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Therap reports, Arkansas Medicaid website, and excel spreadsheet of responses of self-assessment tool

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

12.1 Percent of CYSHCN ages 12-17 years served by Special Child Health Services Case Management Units (SCHS CMUs) with at least one transition to adulthood service (New Jersey)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: ESM 12.1 monitors over 20 services, within 7 categories: PCP; transition-specific services; employment; health insurance; Supplemental Security Income; Shared Plan of Care; and any service tied to ‘transition to adulthood’ as an exceptional event.

Numerator: Number of CYSHCN ages 12-17 years served by SCHS CMUs with at least one transition to adulthood service

Denominator: Number of CYSHCN ages 12-17 years served by SCHS CMUs

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90% of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Successful transition to all aspects of adulthood is a critical life course measure for CYSHCN.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The data source is a statewide electronic documentation system used by all 21 county SCHS CMUs. The Case Management Referral System (CMRS) is used to track and monitor services provided to CYSHCN and their families. Included in CMRS is the ability to create and modify an Individual Service Plan (ISP), track services, and create a record of each contact with the child and child's family. The primary limitation of the data is that it is limited to CYSHCN served by SCHS CMUs (i.e., excludes children without special health care needs and CYSHCN not served by SCHS CMUs).

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

12.1 Number of individuals who have received education and /or training on healthcare transition. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of individuals (health professionals, youth/young adults, and families) who receive education and/or training on healthcare transition.

Numerator: Number of individuals who have received education and / or training on healthcare transition. Note: The data is collected based on federal fiscal year (October through September).

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and healthcare are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: List of individuals who have attended care coordination education and / or training opportunities. Data Issues: None Note: The data is collected based on federal fiscal year (October through September).

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

12.1 Number of adult and pediatric providers who have received training in transition services and caring for CYSHCN. (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who have received the services necessary to make transitions to all aspects of adult life, including adult health care, work, and independence.

Numerator: Unduplicated cumulative number of providers trained

Denominator: Absolute number of providers trained

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Center for Youth and Adults with Conditions of Childhood (CYACC)

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

12.1 Number of adolescents on the Adolescent Advisory Council (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To expand the adolescent advisory council

Numerator: Number of adolescents on the advisory council

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions. Our CSS program requires all children enrolled in the program have a transition plan in place by age of 14 years and updated every year afterward. The Youth Advisory Council will provide recommendations and advise the CSS program staff on transition concerns youth may face.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Children and Youth with Special Healthcare Needs (CYSHCN) program record

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 15

12.2 Percentage of individuals age 14 to 21 served in SHS multidisciplinary clinics that received a transition assessment. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percentage of transition-aged individuals (age 14 to 21 years) served through SHS multidisciplinary clinics who receive transition assessments.

Numerator: Number of individuals age 14 to 21 years served in SHS multidisciplinary clinics who received a transition assessment.

Denominator: Total number of individuals age 14 to 21 that received services in SHS multidisciplinary clinics.

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and healthcare are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Client data listed in PRS through SHS multidisciplinary clinics indicating receiving a transition assessment. Data Issues: None Note: The data is collected based on federal fiscal year (October through September).

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

12.2 Number of providers who receive technical assistance and information on transition for youth and young adults with and without special health care needs (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase number of providers who receive technical assistance and information on transition for youth and young adults with and without special health care needs

Numerator: Number of providers who receive technical assistance and information on transition for youth and young adults with and without special health care needs

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90% of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions. Our CSS program requires all children enrolled in the program have a transition plan in place by age 14 years and updated every year afterward. The Youth Advisory Council will provide recommendations and advise to CSS program staff on transition concerns youth may face.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Children and Youth with Special Healthcare Needs (CYSHCN) program record

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 365

12.2 Number of participants in Center for Youth and Adults with Conditions of Childhood (CYACC) clinical services. (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who have received the services necessary to make transitions to all aspects of adult life, including adult health care, work, and independence.

Numerator: Unduplicated cumulative number of participants

Denominator: Absolute number of participants

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Center for Youth and Adults with Conditions of Childhood (CYACC)

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

12.3 Percentage of youth served by the Children's Special Services (CSS) program age 14 and older who have an  annual transition plan (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase number of providers who receive technical assistance and information on transition for youth and young adults with and without special health care needs

Numerator: Number of providers who receive technical assistance and information on transition for youth and young adults with and without special health care needs

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90% of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions. Our CSS program requires all children enrolled in the program have a transition plan in place by age 14 years and updated every year afterward. The Youth Advisory Council will provide recommendations and advise to CSS program staff on transition concerns youth may face.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Children and Youth with Special Healthcare Needs (CYSHCN) program record

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

12.4 Number of youths and parents/legal guardians who have completed the Transition Readiness Assessment tool (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of youths and parents/legal guardians who have completed the Transition Readiness Assessment tool

Numerator: Number of youths and parents/legal guardians who have completed the Transition Readiness Assessment tool

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions. One of our CSS program’s focuses is to endure children enrolled in the program have a transition plan in place by age of 14 years and updated every year afterward. The program is to develop a Transition Readiness Assessment tool and program staff will work with youth and parents/guardians to ensure the completion of the Transition Readiness Assessment tool before the children reach 12 years of age.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health - CSS Program data captured in REDCap

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

12.6 Percent of transition age CSHCN (age 12 through 17) served by CHC who received transition services and supports in the past 12 months from CHC (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Top level: direct services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To empower families of CSHCN by educating them on all levels of transition and how to obtain needed information from providers.

Numerator: Unduplicated number of transition age youth (age 12 through 17) served by CHC who received transition services and supports from CHC in the past 12 months.

Denominator: Unduplicated number of transition age youth (age 12 through 17) served by CHC.

Significance: The transition of youth to adulthood has become a priority issue nationwide as evidenced by the clinical report and algorithm developed jointly by the AAP, American Academy of Family Physicians and American College of Physicians to improve healthcare transitions for all youth and families. Over 90 percent of children with special health care needs now live to adulthood, but are less likely than their non-disabled peers to complete high school, attend college or to be employed. Health and health care are cited as two of the major barriers to making successful transitions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Therap unduplicated transition age youth reports, CHC staff monthly activity reports and CHC Health Care Transition Quality Improvement audits

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.