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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Displaying records 1 through 2 (2 total).

3.1 Percent of facilities with a plan for transport out of complicated obstetric/ maternal patients. (California)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the no. of women at high risk to receive care in facilities that are prepared to provide the required level of specialized car

Numerator: no. of facilities in the survey that identified that they have a writtern transport out plan for complicated obstetric/ maternal patients

Denominator: no. of facilities completing the survey

Significance: There is an increased risk of neonatal mortality for very low birthweight infants born outside a level III hospital. Studies have demonstrated that timely access to risk-appropriate neonatal and obstetric care could reduce perinatal mortality. Numerous studies have shown that improved neonatal outcomes were achieved through application of risk-appropriate maternal transport systems. Because all facilities cannot maintain the breadth of resources available at subspecialty centers, interfacility transport of pregnant women or women in the postpartum period is an essential component of a regionalized perinatal health care system.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Baseline information will use data collected by the 2016 COIIN Risk-appropriate Perinatal Care Environmental Scan. Data Issue: The data is self-reported at a point in time. To track changes in the percent of facilities with a written plan for transport out of complicated obstetric/ maternal patients, a question from the 2016 Environmental Scan will be asked of facilities annually as part of a follow-up survey. The question to be asked annually is: Does your facility have a written plan for transport out of complicated obstetric / maternal patients?

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

3.2 Ensure risk appropriate care for high risk infants by increasing the number of hospitals with a formal written plan for transport of complicated obstetric/maternal patients to reduce infant mortality/morbidity. (Missouri)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By June 30, 2020, MO DHSS will increase the number of hospitals with a formal written plan for transport of complicated obstetric/maternal patients from 58.6 to 75.0%.

Numerator: Number of facilities with a formal written transfer plan for complicated obstetric/maternal patients.

Denominator: Number of birthing facilities with known status on transfer policy, as reported through the CDC Levels of Care Assessment Tool (CDC LOCATe) annually.

Significance: LOCATe - The CDC Levels of Care Assessment Tool (CDC LOCATe) is designed to help states and other jurisdictions monitor neonatal and maternal risk appropriate care. CDC LOCATe uses the minimum information necessary to identify a facility’s neonatal level of care, based on criteria by American Academy of Pediatrics, and maternal level of care based recently published criteria by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists/Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. The goal of regionalized maternal care is for pregnant women at high risk to receive care in facilities that are prepared to provide the required level of specialized care. Each facility should have a clear understanding of its capability to handle increasingly complex levels of maternal care, and should have a well-defined threshold for transferring women to health care facilities that offer a higher level of care. These proposed categories of maternal care are meant to facilitate this process. These guidelines also are intended to foster the development of equitably distributed resources throughout the country. To ensure optimal care of all pregnant women, all birth centers, hospitals, and higher-level facilities should collaborate to develop and maintain maternal and neonatal transport plans and cooperative agreements capable of managing the health care needs of women who develop complications; receiving hospitals should openly accept transfers. The appropriate care level for patients should be driven by their medical need for that care and not limited by financial constraint. Because of the importance of accurate data for the assessment of outcomes, all facilities should have requirements for data collection, storage, and retrieval. An important goal of regionalized maternal care is for higher-level facilities to provide training for quality improvement initiatives, educational support, and severe morbidity and mortality case review for lower-level hospitals. Transfer of the complicated pregnant

Data Sources and Data Issues: CDC LOCATe, MO DHSS.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.