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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 4 (4 total).

ESM 7.1.1 Percent of families served in home visiting programs who have reports of child maltreatment (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Moderate. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Education During Home Visiting Programs". Find other NPM 7 caregiver-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase parenting skills to help parents avoid maltreatment.

Numerator: Number of families served in home visiting programs who have substantiated reports of maltreatment

Denominator: Number of families served in home visiting programs

Significance: Child maltreatment has lifelong effects (ACEs) on health and well-being. It also increases emergency department visits.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Evaluation data from the ADH Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Year: 2021

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 7.1.1 Number of households participating in evidence-based home visiting programs (Louisiana)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Moderate. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Education During Home Visiting Programs". Find other NPM 7 Patients/Consumers/Caregivers level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of households receiving injury prevention education during home visiting sessions

Numerator: Number of households enrolled in home visiting during the reporting period

Denominator:

Significance: Evidence-based home visiting programs, such as those supported through the federal MIECHV program and implemented by the Bureau of Family Health, have been linked to improvements in a variety of indicators of child and family health, including those related to child injury and violence. Louisiana MIECHV does not currently collect data on the specific education activities and facilitators utilized during home visits, however all clients receive some education related to child injury prevention. This ESM measures progress in relation to increasing enrollment in evidence-based home visiting programs, and therefore increasing the reach of families benefiting from injury prevention interventions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MIECHV Annual Performance Report

Year: 2021

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10000

ESM 7.1.3 Percent of local county health departments that have at least one staff trained in safe car seat installation and use. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Moderate. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Partnerships to Scale Evidence-based Programs and Practices". Find other NPM 7 State/National level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2025, 100% of local county health departments will have at least one staff member trained in safe car seat installation and use.

Numerator: Number of local county health departments that have at least one staff member trained

Denominator: Total number of local county health departments

Significance: Car seat distribution programs provide parents with car seats (i.e., infant, convertible, and booster seats) free of charge, via loan, or low cost rental These programs often include efforts to teach parents how to correctly install and use car seats. Programs are generally targeted to low income parents of infants and young children and can be implemented through hospitals, clinics, insurance companies, community organizations, and home visitation. There is strong evidence that car seat distribution and education programs increase car seat use and correct use of car seats. Car seat distribution programs are effective for rural, urban, and suburban populations and for low and high-income populations. Such programs also appear to increase car seat use in tribal communities.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Healthy Arizona Families Integrated IGA

Year: 2021

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 7.1.7 Completed assessment of injury prevention risk assessment, education, and remediation in Oregon’s public health home visiting programs. (Oregon)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM is based on state data and measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 1. Assess and monitor population health

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To assess injury prevention efforts in Oregon's home visiting programs.

Numerator: N/A

Denominator:

Significance: In order to better provide technical assistance in the prevention of child injury to the home visiting workforce, Title V first needs to examine what currents efforts are, and where improvements can be made in education or referral services.

Data Sources and Data Issues: State tracking

Year: 2021

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.