Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

7.1.1 The percentage of school districts participating in a child safety seat awareness campaign. (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase child safety seats for elementary age students/families.

Numerator: Number of districts distributing educational materials.

Denominator: Number of schools districts.

Significance: Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. But many of these deaths can be prevented. Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces serious and fatal injuries by more than half. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Six teens ages 16 to 19 die every day from motor vehicle injuries. Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash. Compared with other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Administrative data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Percentage of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations to make sure car seats are properly installed. (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations to make sure car seats are properly installed.

Numerator: The number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2016 - the number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2015.

Denominator: The number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2015.

Significance: Based on strong evidence of effectiveness, the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Reports from Indiana Criminal Justice Institute and Automotive Safety Program in Indiana.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Ratio, Unit Number: 1

7.1.1 Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of parents of caregivers receiving car seat education

Numerator: Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Motor vehicle crash injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. In 2014, over 1,000 children ages 12 and under were seen in Tennessee emergency departments because of motor vehicle crashes. CDC research suggests that black and Hispanic children ages 12 and under are less likely to buckle up than white children. The consistent and correct use of car seats and boosters can reduce the risk of serious injury and death for infants, toddlers, and children up to age 8. Tennessee utilizes a recommended practice to distribute car seats with education programs to increase restraint and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health Child Injury Prevention Program Data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 3,000

7.1.1 Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Numerator: Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. The consistent and correct use of car seats and boosters can reduce the risk of serious inh=jury and death for infants, toddlers and children.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Emergency Medical Services for Children program data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians (Kansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians

Numerator: Number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: Injury is the leading cause of child mortality. For those who suffer non-fatal severe injuries, many will become children with special health care needs. Effective interventions to reduce injury exist but are not fully implemented in systems of care that serve children and their families. Reducing the burden of nonfatal injury can greatly improve the life course trajectory of infants, children, and adolescents resulting in improved quality of life and cost savings. Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. A correctly used car seat or seatbelt can keep a child from being ejected during a car crash. Many times, child restraint systems are used incorrectly. An estimated 46% of car and booster seats (59% of car seats and 20% of booster seats) are misused in a way that can reduce their effectiveness. The Community Preventive Service Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and death to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Kansas Traffic Safety Resource Office

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

7.1.1 Implementation of Child Passenger Safety Strategies in local communities (Kentucky)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of local health departments that implement the Child Passenger Safety package in their community.

Numerator: The number of local health departments that implement the Child Passenger Safety package

Denominator: None

Significance: Education of community on appropriate child restraint use and safe teen driving will reduce the occurrence of non-fatal and fatal motor vehicle injuries in the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Catalyst Reports from Local Health Departments

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 60

7.1.2 Percent of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education

Numerator: Number of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education

Denominator: Number of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program

Significance: Injury is a leading cause of child morbidity and mortality. Home visitors can play an important role in increasing awareness about injury hazard, identifying risk and protective factors in the home setting, and teaching caregivers injury prevention methods. Home visiting is one strategy that shows promise for reducing rates of self-reported and substantiated child maltreatment and use of emergency rooms to treat child injuries.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Home visiting program database

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.2 Number of providers and caregivers who attend Poison Control Center Prevention education sessions (Massachusetts)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the number of providers and caregivers who receive poisoning prevention education. From May 2017-May 2018, 355 people attended education sessions. The goal is to reach 400 people in FY19 and then maintain that level of participation in subse

Numerator: N/A

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The following studies indicate that the most successful interventions to prevent poisoning involve increasing education and awareness of poison control center services, including access to their contact numbers: • Prevention of childhood poisoning in the home: overview of systematic reviews and a systematic review of primary studies, Wynn et. Al, Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot., 2016 Mar, 23(1):3-28. • The use of poison prevention and education strategies to enhance the awareness of the poison information center and to prevent accidental pediatric poisonings, Krenzelok, EP, J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 1995;33(6):663-7. This ESM ensures that providers (including child-serving agencies) and caregivers (including parents and grandparents) have access to the most up-to-date poison prevention information. Sharing strategies for poison prevention, including the importance of safely storing medications and household chemicals, brings awareness to the importance and feasibility of incorporating safety strategies into home and organizational protocols. Dissemination of materials in Spanish, Mandarin and other languages ensures Massachusetts residents for whom English is a second language also receive this vital information.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Massachusetts and Rhode Island Regional Center of Poison Prevention and Control, Boston Children’s Hospital

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 400

7.1.2 Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Numerator: Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Unintentional poisoning killed 635 U.S. Children in 2014; almost 90% of them were teenagers, ages 10-19. In 2014 117,959 U.S. children visited emergency departments for unintentional poisoning-related injuries (WISQARS). Reducing the amount of prescription drugs in the home can reduce access to these drugs by children. Research indicates the high availability of prescription drugs in Tennessee is contributing to the addiction problem across the state. According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 70% of people who abused or misused prescription drugs got them from a friend or relative, either for free, by purchasing them, or by stealing them. People who abuse prescription drugs also obtain them from other sources including “pill mills,” or illegitimate pain clinics; prescription fraud; pharmacy theft; illegal online pharmacies; and “doctor shopping”. Some individuals who use prescription drugs for non-medical reasons believe these substances are safer than illicit drugs because they are prescribed by a physician and dispensed by a pharmacist. Communities that develop partnerships with schools, healthcare providers, pharmacists, law enforcement and other sectors to educate families about the importance of monitoring, securing, and properly disposing of prescription drugs can reduce access to unused prescription drugs and increase the perception of harm of the abuse of prescription drugs.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health Injury Prevention Program reports

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 93

7.1.2 Education campaign around Shaken Baby Syndrome (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase awareness of Shaken Baby Syndrome, including causes and prevention.

Numerator: Does a coordinated campaign exist?

Denominator: Does a coordinated campaign exist?

Significance: Child maltreatment has lifelong effects (ACEs) on health and well-being. It also increases emergency department visits.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program information

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

7.1.3 To conduct Direct on Scene Education (DOSE) to first responders in order to reduce unsafe sleep-related deaths in infants less than one year of age (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Train at least 50% of Emergency Medical Technicians to conduct Direct on Scene education (DOSE)

Numerator: The number of Emergency Medical Technicians that have received DOSE training

Denominator: The total number of Emergency Medical Technicians

Significance: Training Emergency Medical Technicians to conduct activities associated with DOSE will reduce the risk of unsafe sleep environments in the home of families with pregnant women and infants less than one year of age. First responders have a unique opportunity that nurses, physicians and other providers of care do not; namely, they are able to see families in their home environment and visually assess an infant's sleep environment while educating, not just the mother, but the whole family on ways to reduce risk factors associated with SID/SUID, asphyxia, suffocation, and/or strangulation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Health Professional License Office (HPLO) Office of Emergency Medical Services

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.3 Support county public health departments who have identified decreasing preventable child injuries as a priority need in their communities. (Montana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To support county public health departments who have identified decreasing preventable child injuries as a priority need in their communities.

Numerator: Total number of counties choosing to use MCHBG funding for child injury prevention education activities, which have met their activity goals.

Denominator: Total number of counties choosing to use MCHBG funding for child injury prevention education activities.

Significance: The FCHB will contract with CPHDs interested in decreasing the rate of preventable injuries to children. These counties will implement and evaluate at least two community-level activities during the fiscal year. This will raise community-level awareness of the importance of injury prevention strategies.

Data Sources and Data Issues: FCHB - The number of counties choosing to use MCHBG funding in this way may change from year to year.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.3 Percent of families who receive injury prevention education through the AAP checklist among families participating in Evidence Based Home Visiting programs (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent of families who receive injury prevention education through the AAP checklist among families participating in Evidence Based Home Visiting programs

Numerator: Number of children with at least one AAP screening completed

Denominator: Number of children who reached first birthday during reporting period

Significance: Injury is a leading cause of child mortality and morbidity. In 2014, injuries resulted in more than 3,131 deaths and 2.3 million emergency department visits among 0-4 year olds in the US (CDC WISQARS). Home visitors can play an important role in increasing awareness about injury hazards, identifying risk and protective factors in the home setting, and teaching caregivers injury prevention methods. Using a childhood injury risk assessment tool, home visitors can identify risks and provide education on a wide range of injury topics. Home visiting is one strategy that shows promise for reducing rates of self-reported and substantiated child maltreatment and use of emergency rooms to treat child injuries.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health - Evidence Based Home Visiting Database

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.3 Number of health and safety interventions performed as a result of health and safety hazards identified through comprehensive home assessments. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Annually increase the number of health and safety interventions performed.

Numerator: Number of health and safety interventions performed as a result of health and safety hazards identified through comprehensive home assessments through the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: This number identifies the number of health and safety interventions that have been performed to reduce the leading causes of injuries to children and adolescents ages 0-19. All allowable interventions are evidence based or evidence informed and have a direct connection to the prevention of injuries that often lead to hospitalization. The families targeted with the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program frequently do not have the education to understand the need for these interventions and more importantly do not have the available resources to otherwise implement the interventions.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Quarterly reports from Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program will provide this information. The grant agreements for the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program have not yet been fully executed. While no issues have been identified to delay program implementation, it is behind schedule. It is estimated that grantees will provide an average of 5 interventions (give items to residents) per home assessed. The number of interventions does not equal the number of hazards found as not all hazards require a countable item intervention.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10,000

7.2.1 The number of schools that were provided the Impact Teen Driver Presentations. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To grow the Impact Teen Driver Program in ND.

Numerator: The current number of schools that were provided the Impact Teen Driver presentations in ND.

Denominator: The number of schools that were provided Impact Teen Driver Presentations by 2022.

Significance: Childhood injuries continue to be a leading cause of death to children in North Dakota (ND). In 2014, non-fatal injury hospitalization rates for children ages one through nine were at a rate of 127.49 (down from 2013 - 140.75) per 100,000. As children get older and enter adolescence, hospitalization rates start to increase (ages 10-19) to 348.09 (up from 2013 – 322.29) per 100,000. Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teenagers; young drivers are twice as likely as adult drivers to be in a fatal crash. Motor vehicle crash injuries are preventable and implemented proven strategies can improve the safety of young drivers on the road. Establishing seat belt usage before and throughout adolescence will increase the chances of a teenager surviving future motor vehicle crashes. The three year aggregate rate from 2013-2015 for adolescent motor vehicle mortality for ages 15-19 is 21.02, which has decreased slightly from a rate of 22.66 (aggregate data from 2012-2014). The Impact Teen Drivers (ITD) program is an evidence-based program that uses engaging awareness and educational materials for teens, parents, teachers and health professionals. This curriculum facilitates engaging classroom discussion focused on reckless and distracted driving and the importance of making good decisions behind the wheel. From December 1, 2016 to the present, ND has reached 23 schools with the ITD presentations. Providing the ITD program in ND schools may lead teens, parents and community members to think differently about distracted and reckless driving. This different way of thinking may lead to behavior changes.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The number of presentations that are delivered in the schools is tracked by the entity that the NDDoH contracts with. http://www.impactteendrivers.org/ Note: The data is for the federal fiscal year October of the year to September.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50

7.2.1 The number of schools participating in the "Teens in the Driver Seat" program (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of schools participating in an evidence-based teen driver safety program.

Numerator: NA

Denominator: NA

Significance: Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. Teens in the Driver Seat® is a teen driven peer-to-peer educational program that focuses solely on traffic safety and addresses all major driving risks for this age group. Teens, along with a sponsor, help shape the program and are responsible for implementing it.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program Data, Nebraska Injury Prevention.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.2.1 Number of Texas Health Steps Online Provider Education (OPE) users completing injury prevention modules. (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of providers taking OPE modules, so providers are better able to educate parents and children on injury prevention strategies and resources, in order to prevent injuries and reduce their consequences.

Numerator: Number of individual users completing one or more Texas Health Steps Online Provider Education (OPE) injury prevention modules per year

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents, both in Texas and the United States as a whole. Many aspects of the environment in which children live (physical, social, cultural, economic, etc.) have impacts on injury risk. Both fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries are very costly; in addition to the burden of death and disability, childhood injuries can result in substantial economic costs, including medical costs for the child and lost work days for caregivers. In order to impact the number of injury-related hospital admissions per population ages birth to 19 years, parents and professionals need to increase their knowledge of the potential risks impacting this population and strategies available to reduce the risk. This measure will examine the number of individuals who completed injury prevention-related OPE modules.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: DSHS Texas Health Steps Online Provider Education (OPE) website data Texas Health Steps OPE module data will be utilized to measure providers trainings on injury prevention. Texas Health Steps OPE is an award-winning online program offering free continuing education modules for primary care providers and other health professionals. These modules offer updated clinical, regulatory, and best practice guidelines for a range of preventive health, oral health, mental health, and case management topics. Completion of at least one of the following injury prevention modules will be assessed for this measure: 1. Adolescent Health Screening 2. Adolescent Substance Use 3. Childhood Trauma and Toxic Stress 4. Identifying and Treating Young People with High-Risk Behaviors 5. Interpersonal Youth Violence 6. Pediatric Head Injury: Abusive Head Trauma 7. Pediatric Head Injury: Concussion 8. Pediatric Head Injury: Overview 9. Preventing Unintentional Injury: 13 to 18 Years 10. Preventing Unintentional Injury: 5 to 12 Years 11. Preventing Unintentional Injury: Birth to 4 Years 12. Preventing Unintentional Injury: Overview Data Issues: Texas Health Steps OPE modules offered may be subject to change, which could impact analysis of trends over time. Specific data on the methods by which many of the childhood unintentional injuries took place is limited.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50,000

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.