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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

8.1.1 The cumulative total of Florida school districts that have ever been awarded the evidence-based Florida Healthy School District recognition. (Florida)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of students who attend schools in Florida Healthy School Districts.

Numerator: The number of school districts that apply for the evidence-based Florida Healthy School District recognition.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The Florida Healthy School District Self-Assessment Tool was developed by experts from state agencies, school districts, and community partners to assist districts in achieving the highest standards in infrastructure and the eight component areas of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Coordinated School Health (CSH) model. It was piloted, field tested and fully vetted prior to its release in 2009. Districts that earn recognition as a Florida Healthy School District have made a high level commitment to meeting the health needs of students and staff by removing barriers to learning and maximizing district resources through the implementation of the CSH/Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) approach including physical education and physical activity.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Florida Partnership for Healthy Schools

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

8.1.1 Number of schools surveyed that are engaged in shared use activities. (West Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase physical activity and improved nutrition in communities through school-based and community-based activities.

Numerator: Number of schools implementing shared use.

Denominator: n/a

Significance: By increasing shared use agreements and other opportunities for physical activity and improved nutrition, the WV OMCFH is supporting a systematic improvement to obesity.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be provided by the Adolescent Health Grantees

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

8.1.1 Number of programs/trainings implemented to increase and integrate physical activity into typical school activities (for children). (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: The state hopes to train a variety of professionals and community members to implement physical activity best practices across a wide-range of settings.

Numerator: N/A

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The measurement of the number of number of trainings or programs is significant because Indiana has a wide range of groups that work with youth. If these professionals are given the knowledge and the tools to increase physical activity in their respective settings, they are more likely to buy-in to implementing them and, in turn, the more children and adolescents we will have engaging in physical activity.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be determined by documenting each training and program initiated with the Title V funding.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

8.1.1 Number of classrooms or schools that sign on to 3-4-50, including a commitment to daily recess (Vermont)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Reduce the risk of chronic disease across the lifespan.

Numerator: Number of classrooms or schools that sign on to 3-4-50, including a commitment to daily recess

Denominator: No denominator.

Significance: Recognizing the tendency to address chronic disease prevention and health promotion from discrete silos based on behavior or disease, HPDP has planned and implemented a two-pronged approach to communicate a coordinated message about chronic disease and engage new partners from multiple sectors to address it. 3-4-50 is a statewide initiative to create an epiphany about chronic disease and spur action to reduce the incidence of disease. Based on San Diego County’s efforts using the three numbers, Vermont’s chronic disease unit has created a series of data briefs, communication tools and partner engagement materials that focus attention on the three behaviors of tobacco use, physical inactivity and poor diet that lead to the four chronic diseases of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and lung disease that together result in more than 50 percent of deaths in Vermont. This initiative seeks to make chronic disease prevention simple and to help leaders across multiple sectors in the community recognize that they are partners in prevention. Engaging worksites, schools and childcares, cities and towns, retailers, and faith communities, the message and strategies of 3-4-50 bring data and evidence-based interventions together to create a simple to understand initiative that spurs urgent action. Specifically in schools and childcare programs, 3-4-50 calls out ways to help children learn healthy behaviors from the start. Tips for each include ways to help children eat healthier foods, be more physically active and, for older children, information and skills that will help them say no to tobacco use. The 3-4-50 tips and sign on sheets build from simple, effective interventions to more complex but longer lasting policy changes that will solidify strong nutrition and physical activity programs and prevent tobacco use initiation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data source: Program data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

8.1.2 % children ages 5-19 impacted by improvements to the built environment (Rhode Island)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percent of children impacted by changes to the built environment from 60% to 81% by 2023

Numerator: # children ages 5-19 living in municipalities where improvements to the built environment occurred

Denominator: # children ages 5-19 living in Rhode Island

Significance: Understanding how many children live in areas that have taken measures to improve the built environment to encourage physical activity is essential for understanding the reach of interventions, and to understand municipalities to target in the state to achieve greatest impact. According to a recent review article "Street connectivity, physical activity, and childhood obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis" by Jia, et al, (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/obr.12943), found a positive association between street connectivity and physical activity but that more evidence is needed to confirm the causal association between street connectivity and weight status.

Data Sources and Data Issues: American Community Survey, Physical Activity and Nutrition Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

8.1.3 Percent of local grantees supported/provided with technical assistance to work on developing school wellness policies or safe routes to school, among those that selected the child physical activity priority area. (Oregon)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To support local grantees in the implementation of school wellness policies and safe routes to school.

Numerator: Number of local grantees supported/provided with technical assistance to work on developing school wellness policies or safe routes to school, among those that selected the child physical activity priority area

Denominator: Number of local grantees that selected the child physical activity priority area

Significance: Title V state and local partners can make a lasting impact on opportunities and access for physical activity for children by creating and strengthening policies, systems and the environment in communities. Two key opportunities include strengthening school wellness policies and developing Safe Routes to School programs. Children spend a significant portion of their days in school settings. Comprehensive inclusion of physical activity in school and district wellness policies can help assure that there is designated time and space for all children to meet national physical activity guidelines during the school day. Active transportation to and from school offers health benefits to children, parents and other community members alike, while changing the context for commuting.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Log of technical assistance provided

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

8.1.4 % children (0-17) living in a HEZ community with initiatives related to physical activity and nutrition (Rhode Island)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: 100%

Numerator: # children (0-17) living in a HEZ community with initiatives related to physical activity and nutrition

Denominator: # children (0-17) living in a HEZ community

Significance: Childhood overweight and obesity rates continue to increase in Rhode Island and they exceed national averages. Rates are high statewide, and racial and ethnic disparities are present. The Health Equity Zones are an opportunity for communities to promote policies and programs that could reduce childhood overweight and obesity (for example, bike paths, school breakfast programs, community gardens, walking school bus, etc.)

Data Sources and Data Issues: Health Equity Institute / ACS Population Estimates

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

8.2.1 Number of schools with staff who participate in professional development opportunities that include methods to provide a minimum of 30 minutes of daily physical activity opportunities for all students throughout the school day. (South Carolina)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of professional development opportunities for schools that include methods to provide a minimum of 30 minutes of daily physical activity.

Numerator: Number of schools with staff participating in professional development opportunities offered.

Denominator: 1

Significance: Professional development activities ensure that physical education interventions in schools are more sustainable.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Bureau of Community Health and Chronic Disease Prevention Program data.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 300

8.2.1 Number of schools surveyed that are engaged in shared use activities (West Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase physical activity and improved nutrition in communities through school-based and community-based activities

Numerator: Number of schools implementing shared use

Denominator: n/a

Significance: By increasing shared use agreements and other opportunities for physical activity and improved nutrition, the WV OMCFH is supporting a systematic improvement to obesity

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be provided by the Adolescent Health Grantees

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

8.2.1 Number of programs/trainings implemented to increase and integrate physical activity into typical school activities (for adolescents). (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: The state hopes to train a variety of professionals and community members to implement physical activity best practices across a wide-range of settings.

Numerator: N/A

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The measurement of the number of number of trainings or programs is significant because Indiana has a wide range of groups that work with youth. If these professionals are given the knowledge and the tools to increase physical activity in their respective settings, they are more likely to buy-in to implementing them and, in turn, the more children and adolescents we will have engaging in physical activity.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be determined by documenting each training and program initiated with the Title V funding.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

8.2.1 Number of physical activity hours among school-aged kids through the Go Noodle physical activity program (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the cumulative hours of physical activity for school-aged kids by using the Go Noodle program

Numerator: Number of cumulative hours of physical activity

Denominator: Number of cumulative hours of physical activity

Significance: Childhood obesity has continued to be a significant problem for the State of Arkansas. Arkansas has one of the highest obesity prevalence among adults in the nation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Arkansas Children's Hospital, Community Clinical Programs

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 2,000,000

8.2.1 Number of Physical Activity Clubs in K-12 schools (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of Run Clubs for 5th through 8th graders

Numerator: Tennessee Run Clubs with participants in grades 5th through 8th grade (identified through TDH partnerships)

Denominator: N/A

Significance: A Physical Activity Club is a community or school-based physical activity opportunity that allows a young person to see their progress over time through better run/walk times or longer distances. Activities may include walking, jogging or running around school grounds on a walking track, competition track, athletic field, green space, or may occur at other locations such as state parks, swimming pools or any organized sport program. Physical Activity Clubs provide opportunities for students to be physically active as part of a goal to reach at least 60-minutes a day of moderate to vigorous physical activity.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Physical Activity Clubs are tracked by the TDH Chronic Disease Section. New PA clubs are submitted by local health department staff (health educators, coordinators, etc.) and are subsequently added to a tracking tool.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 359

8.2.1 Number of community environmental changes demonstrated as a result of enhanced collaborations. (New York)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Enhance collaboration with key partners at the state or local levels to advance changes at the community-, environmental- or policy/systems-levels that promote maternal and child health

Numerator: Number of DFH programs/initiatives in the Denominator reporting meeting their community-, environmental- or policy/systems-level goals during the reporting period.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: As highlighted in the needs assessment, both families and providers identified the critical role that home and community environments play in health outcomes and health behaviors. Factors including access to healthy affordable food and places to engage safely in physical activity have significant impact on families’ health and well-being. These perceptions are consistent with broader and longstanding public health approaches aimed at supporting “healthycommunities”, including strong commitments to community-driven change, policy and environmental change strategies (vs. individual-level strategies), and a focus on addressing social determinants of health rather than treating disease. Title V programs cannot impact in isolation all of areas of social determinants of health, making collaboration a critical focus of DFH.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Title V Program data DFH staff were surveyed once to identify those belonging in the denominator, then were surveyed again after the reporting period to report on progress towards meeting goals.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

8.2.2 Percentage of school districts that adopt the SC School Boards Association’s Open Community Use of School Recreational Areas model policy (South Carolina)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of school districts that adopt the SC School Boards Association’s Open Community Use of School Recreational Areas model policy

Numerator: Number of school districts with an Open Community Use of School Recreational Areas policy.

Denominator: Number of total school districts.

Significance: Open use policies can help to addresses problems with the built environment and are an efficient use of resources.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Bureau of Community Health and Chronic Disease Prevention data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

8.2.3 Number of Healthy Parks Healthy Person app users (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of Healthy Parks Healthy Person app users

Numerator: Number of Healthy Parks Healthy Person app users

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Physical activity is an important part of good health for everyone, regardless of age or ability. Healthy Parks Healthy Person remove barriers to physical activity by promoting places to be active. Allowing access to physical activity spaces and facilities is a recommended strategy in the Healthy People 2020 goals for the nation’s health. According to HP 2020, physical activity levels are positively affected by structural environments including trails and parks. Additionally, the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance recommends that communities develop new, and enhance existing, community recreation, fitness, and park programs that provide and promote healthy physical activity opportunities. Physical activity contributes to students’ overall health and well-being. Furthermore, participating in physical activity in safe and clean public spaces helps everyone to feel more connected to their community.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The Healthy Parks Healthy Person app is managed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. TDH must request access to the data on an ad hoc basis, and does not monitor or control data quality. The current app has limited tracking capabilities. During the upcoming year staff will be working to upgrade the app's functionality.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 3,435

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.