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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

9.1 The number of trainings provided by MCH to school staff on bullying prevention (Oklahoma)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the knowledge and preparedness of school staff with respect to bullying prevention

Numerator: The number of trainings provided by MCH staff annually on bullying prevention

Denominator: NA

Significance: Trainings using the evidence-based curriculum will increase the knowledge of school staff on the recognition of bullying and appropriate intervention measures, assist schools in meeting state regulations, and decrease the number of students feeling unsafe at school as measured by the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. (http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/bullyingresearch/index.html, http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/index.htm)

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH bullying prevention training log

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

9.3 # of trainings and learning sessions presented to staff focused on bullying (Delaware)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To strengthen DPH's internal capacity to address bullying as a public health issue.

Numerator: # of trainings/learning sessions offered

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Bullying is a new a priority for DPH and it is important to provide professional development opportunities to our MCH workforce on bullying and strategies to promote social and emotional wellness.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH program data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5

9.3 Number of school professionals who receive technical assistance on bullying prevention. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: By 2020, technical assistance will be provided to a total of 400 professionals across the State on bullying prevention guidance, policies, and/or resources.

Numerator: Number of professionals who receive technical assistance

Denominator: None

Significance: Nationally, the recent decade has seen bullying emerge as an important public health issue. Locally, bullying has also been a major topic; during Arizona's needs assessment process, bullying was identified as an important problem affecting the health and well-being of Arizona's children and adolescents. BWCH selected bullying as an NPM because of the national and community interest in the issue, as well as the data, including trend and demographic, available surrounding bullying. BWCH will be working hard to develop anti-bullying prevention programs and strategies in order to reduce the percentage of adolescents who report being bullied and who bully others.

Data Sources and Data Issues: In-house data from the Must Stop Bullying program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

9.6 Number of school staff and community workers provided with trauma training (District of Columbia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase partner staff knowledge of trauma symptoms and ability to make appropriate mental health referrals for trauma-impacted children/youth.

Numerator: Number of Resilient Scholars Project partner staff provided with trauma training

Denominator: N/A

Significance: In a 2015, 17% of parents of District of Columbia (DC) children reported that a doctor had told them their child had one or more emotional/behavioral/developmental conditions (DC Kids Count 2015). A growing body of research demonstrates the strong link between untreated exposure to trauma and affective disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) in children. Almost 75% of DC students participating in a recent survey said they or a family member or friend had been shot or wounded (ROOT, Inc.). District children suffer traumatic separation from parents and siblings due to one of the nation’s highest incarceration rates (963/100,000) and to high rates of substance abuse and mental illness.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Wendt Center- Resilient Scholars Project

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100,000

9.8 Number of trainers trained in the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the number of community-based organizations participating in a bullying awareness and prevention program.

Numerator: Number of trainers trained in the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Denominator: None

Significance: According to the Bullying in US Schools 2014 Status Report using data from the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire, 17% of all students were involved in bullying by either being bullied, bullying others or both being bullied and bullying others. Bullying affects youth negatively in many ways. Youth who are bullied are more likely to experience depression and anxiety, changes in sleep and eating patterns and decreased academic achievement and school participation. Academic success has a direct impact on their employment prospects and future earnings potential, which impact health and access to health care in adulthood. Youth who bully others are more likely to experience alcohol and drug abuse in adolescence. This serious health problem can persist long after adolescence. LGBTQ youth and those perceived as LGBTQ are at an increased risk of being bullied. Bullied LGBTQ youth, or youth perceived as LGBTQ are more likely to skip school, smoke, use alcohol and drugs, or engage in other risky behaviors. Lesbian, gay or bisexual youth are more than twice as likely as their peers to be depressed and think about or attempt suicide.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data collection and analysis will be performed by the vendor(s) selected by DOH to carry out the activities of the bullying program. It will be a grant deliverable as required by the work statement and reported to DOH via quarterly reports.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.