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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 20 (44 total).

7.1.1 The percentage of school districts participating in a child safety seat awareness campaign. (Nebraska)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase child safety seats for elementary age students/families.

Numerator: Number of districts distributing educational materials.

Denominator: Number of schools districts.

Significance: Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. But many of these deaths can be prevented. Buckling children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts reduces serious and fatal injuries by more than half. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Six teens ages 16 to 19 die every day from motor vehicle injuries. Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash. Compared with other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Administrative data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 The percentage of infants delivered at birthing hospitals providing the Period of Purple Crying Abusive Head Trauma curriculum (Oklahoma)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Reduce the number of infants who experience abusive head trauma

Numerator: The number of infants delivered in birthing hospitals providing the Period of Purple Crying Abusive Head Trauma curriculum

Denominator: The number of resident live births

Significance: The Period of Purple Crying is an evidence-based curriculum shown to have a positive impact on providing new parents with an effective technique for calming the baby and reducing abusive head trauma. The Period of Purple Crying. National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome.http://dontshake.org/purple-crying

Data Sources and Data Issues: Vital Statistics Data, Health Care Information, Center for Health Statistics, Oklahoma State Department of Health and Preparing for a Lifetime Injury Prevention Work Group

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Proportion of maternity centers with prenatal courses including Virginia's injury prevention curriculum (Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Reduce non-fatal injury related hospitalizations for children ages 0 through 9 and adolescents ages 10 through 19.

Numerator: Number of maternity centers with prenatal courses including Virginia's injury prevention curriculum

Denominator: Number of maternity centers

Significance: This ESM was identified through the Title V needs assessment, Virginia's Well-being Plan, and Healthy People 2020 (IVP 1.2). Research from a variety of external sources indicates that the impact of childhood injuries can be reduced with effective primary prevention strategies.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Virginia Department of Health, Office of Family Health Services, Division of Prevention and Health Promotion; piloting evaluation tool in REDCap to track information from maternity centers

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Percentage of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations to make sure car seats are properly installed. (Indiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations to make sure car seats are properly installed.

Numerator: The number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2016 - the number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2015.

Denominator: The number of sites operating mobile fitting and car seat inspection stations as of September 30, 2015.

Significance: Based on strong evidence of effectiveness, the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Reports from Indiana Criminal Justice Institute and Automotive Safety Program in Indiana.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Ratio, Unit Number: 1

7.1.1 Percent of families served in home visiting programs who have reports of child maltreatment (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To decrease child maltreatment in families being served by home visiting programs

Numerator: Number of families being served in home visiting programs who have substantiated reports of maltreatment

Denominator: Number of families being served in home visiting programs

Significance: Child maltreatment has lifelong effects (ACEs) on health and well-being. It also increases emergency department visits.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Evaluation data from the ADH's Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of School Health Friday Beat newsletters per fiscal year with at least one injury prevention resource provided (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To have at least one injury prevention resource in each issue of the Friday Beat, to educate teachers, school administrators, and other interested individuals on injury prevention topics.

Numerator: Number of School Health Friday Beat bi-weekly newsletter issues per year that include at least one injury prevention resource.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents, both in Texas and the United States as a whole. School is one environment in which children spend a significant portion of their day, so this environment could definitely have an impact on injury risk. Both fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries are very costly; in addition to the burden of death and disability, childhood injuries can result in substantial economic costs, including medical costs for the child and lost work days for caregivers. In order to impact the number of injury-related hospital admissions per population ages birth to 19 years, teachers, school administrators, nurses, and other interested individuals need to increase their knowledge of the potential risks impacting this population at school, in the community, and at home, and be provided strategies to reduce the risk. This measure will ensure that injury prevention resources are included in each issue of the School Health Friday Beat newsletter.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Source: DSHS School Health MCHS is working with School Health to try to ensure that every issue of the Friday Beat newsletter includes at least one injury prevention resource. Approximately 25 newsletter issues will be written/distributed each year (issues are published every other week). The Friday Beat newsletter goes out each week to over 2,500 followers through their distribution list. School Health will provide MCHS with the numbers and topics of the injury prevention resources they include in their bi-weekly Friday Beat issues.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of parents of caregivers receiving car seat education

Numerator: Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Motor vehicle crash injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. In 2014, over 1,000 children ages 12 and under were seen in Tennessee emergency departments because of motor vehicle crashes. CDC research suggests that black and Hispanic children ages 12 and under are less likely to buckle up than white children. The consistent and correct use of car seats and boosters can reduce the risk of serious injury and death for infants, toddlers, and children up to age 8. Tennessee utilizes a recommended practice to distribute car seats with education programs to increase restraint and decrease injuries and deaths to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health Child Injury Prevention Program Data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 3,000

7.1.1 Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Numerator: Number of parents and caregivers receiving car seat education

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. The consistent and correct use of car seats and boosters can reduce the risk of serious inh=jury and death for infants, toddlers and children.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Emergency Medical Services for Children program data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians (Kansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians

Numerator: Number of free car seat safety inspections completed by certified child passenger safety technicians

Denominator: Not applicable

Significance: Injury is the leading cause of child mortality. For those who suffer non-fatal severe injuries, many will become children with special health care needs. Effective interventions to reduce injury exist but are not fully implemented in systems of care that serve children and their families. Reducing the burden of nonfatal injury can greatly improve the life course trajectory of infants, children, and adolescents resulting in improved quality of life and cost savings. Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among children in the United States. A correctly used car seat or seatbelt can keep a child from being ejected during a car crash. Many times, child restraint systems are used incorrectly. An estimated 46% of car and booster seats (59% of car seats and 20% of booster seats) are misused in a way that can reduce their effectiveness. The Community Preventive Service Task Force recommends car seat laws and car seat distribution plus education programs to increase restraint use and decrease injuries and death to child passengers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Kansas Traffic Safety Resource Office

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

7.1.1 Number of comprehensive home assessments completed. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Annually increase the number of comprehensive home assessments completed.

Numerator: The number of homes that received a comprehensive home assessment through the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: This number identifies the number of homes that have been evaluated for health and safety hazards that could cause injury to children and adolescents ages 0-19. The holistic approach of a comprehensive home assessment has been demonstrated to be less expensive than conducting separate assessments and subsequent intervention of individual hazards. The Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program will focus on hazards that are leading causes of injuries that lead to hospitalizations. The regions of the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program have a total injury rate higher than the state rate, both a fatal and nonfatal injury rate higher than the state rate or a fatal injury rate more than two times the state rate for individuals under age 25.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Quarterly reports from Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program will provide this information. The grant agreements for the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program have not yet been fully executed. While no issues have been identified to delay program implementation, it is behind schedule. This objective is the number of assessments grantees are expected to complete each year with 920 being the goal required by the grant agreements.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

7.1.1 Number of community campaign on awareness and promotion of child safety within the community. (Marshall Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To be able to reach the community on awareness and promotion of child safety within the community.

Numerator: Number of community campaign conducted

Denominator: Number of community campaign planned (3)

Significance: Reaching community on child safety strategies will increase knowledge and lessen accident that will lead to hospitalization.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.1 Number of ADHS-facilitated injury-related trainings provided to community partners including home visitors through stakeholder engagement. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: By 2020, increase four-fold the number of professional development opportunities to community partners including home visitors on the burden of injury thru stakeholder engagement.

Numerator: Number of professional development opportunities provided for the measurement year.

Denominator: None

Significance: This new measure will allow BWCH to further push the needle on injury prevention efforts by increasing collaboration amongst 3 distinct offices in holistic initiatives to prevent injuries at the home thru developing our strong network of home visitors throughout the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Internal programmatic data from the Program's Office of Women's Health; Office of Children's Health; and Office of Injury Prevention.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50

7.1.1 Implementation of Child Passenger Safety Strategies in local communities (Kentucky)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of local health departments that implement the Child Passenger Safety package in their community.

Numerator: The number of local health departments that implement the Child Passenger Safety package

Denominator: None

Significance: Education of community on appropriate child restraint use and safe teen driving will reduce the occurrence of non-fatal and fatal motor vehicle injuries in the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Catalyst Reports from Local Health Departments

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 60

7.1.2 Percent of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education

Numerator: Number of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program who receive injury prevention education

Denominator: Number of families participating in the evidence-based home visiting program

Significance: Injury is a leading cause of child morbidity and mortality. Home visitors can play an important role in increasing awareness about injury hazard, identifying risk and protective factors in the home setting, and teaching caregivers injury prevention methods. Home visiting is one strategy that shows promise for reducing rates of self-reported and substantiated child maltreatment and use of emergency rooms to treat child injuries.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Home visiting program database

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.2 Percent of child deaths reviewed by Child Fatality Review Teams (CFRT) (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the percentage of child death reviews completed by Child Fatality Review Teams.

Numerator: Number of child deaths reviewed by Child Fatality Review Teams (CFRT) per calendar year

Denominator: Total number of child deaths in Texas per calendar year

Significance: Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents, both in Texas and the United States as a whole. Many aspects of the environment in which children live (physical, social, cultural, economic, etc.) have impacts on injury risk. Both fatal and nonfatal childhood injuries are very costly; in addition to the burden of death and disability, childhood injuries can result in substantial economic costs, including medical costs for the child and lost work days for caregivers. In order to impact the number of injury-related hospital admissions per population ages birth to 19 years, regional CFR teams need to increase their knowledge of the potential risks impacting this population. Texas will lead CFR team trainings in the fall of 2016 to educate them on injury prevention best practices and intervention methods as well as on the collection, assessment and documentation of child death reporting to best inform future injury prevention strategies and interventions. Due to these trainings and the introduction of paid coordinators in two communities, an increase in the percentage of child deaths reviewed is expected in the coming years.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: DSHS Maternal and Child Health Section (MCHS) CFRT data Data Issues: CFRTs are volunteers, so teams may not be entering data consistently. MCHS will provide training to teams in order to establish fidelity across the counties covered.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

7.1.2 Number of providers and caregivers who attend Poison Control Center Prevention education sessions (Massachusetts)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Increase the number of providers and caregivers who receive poisoning prevention education. From May 2017-May 2018, 355 people attended education sessions. The goal is to reach 400 people in FY19 and then maintain that level of participation in subse

Numerator: N/A

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The following studies indicate that the most successful interventions to prevent poisoning involve increasing education and awareness of poison control center services, including access to their contact numbers: • Prevention of childhood poisoning in the home: overview of systematic reviews and a systematic review of primary studies, Wynn et. Al, Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot., 2016 Mar, 23(1):3-28. • The use of poison prevention and education strategies to enhance the awareness of the poison information center and to prevent accidental pediatric poisonings, Krenzelok, EP, J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 1995;33(6):663-7. This ESM ensures that providers (including child-serving agencies) and caregivers (including parents and grandparents) have access to the most up-to-date poison prevention information. Sharing strategies for poison prevention, including the importance of safely storing medications and household chemicals, brings awareness to the importance and feasibility of incorporating safety strategies into home and organizational protocols. Dissemination of materials in Spanish, Mandarin and other languages ensures Massachusetts residents for whom English is a second language also receive this vital information.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Massachusetts and Rhode Island Regional Center of Poison Prevention and Control, Boston Children’s Hospital

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 400

7.1.2 Number of health and safety hazards identified through comprehensive home assessments. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Annually increase the number of health and safety hazards identified.

Numerator: The number of health and safety hazards identified through comprehensive home assessments performed through the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: This number identifies the number of health and safety hazards that have been identified in homes that have been evaluated for health and safety hazards that could cause injury to children and adolescents ages 0-19. The holistic approach of a comprehensive home assessment has been demonstrated to be less expensive than conducting separate assessments and subsequent intervention of individual hazards. The Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program will focus on hazards that are leading causes of injuries that lead to hospitalizations. The regions of the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program have a total injury rate higher than the state rate; both a fatal and nonfatal injury rate higher than the state rate; or a fatal injury rate more than two times the state rate for individuals under age 25.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Quarterly reports from Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program will provide this information. The grant agreements for the Pennsylvania Safe and Healthy Homes Program have not yet been fully executed. While no issues have been identified to delay program implementation, it is behind schedule. The projected objectives are calculated by multiplying the number of home assessments completed by the average number of hazards identified in each home. It is estimated there will be an average of 8 hazards identified in each home that an assessment is completed in.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 20,000

7.1.2 Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Numerator: Number of counties that adopt Count It! Drop It! Lock It! educational programs

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Unintentional poisoning killed 635 U.S. Children in 2014; almost 90% of them were teenagers, ages 10-19. In 2014 117,959 U.S. children visited emergency departments for unintentional poisoning-related injuries (WISQARS). Reducing the amount of prescription drugs in the home can reduce access to these drugs by children. Research indicates the high availability of prescription drugs in Tennessee is contributing to the addiction problem across the state. According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 70% of people who abused or misused prescription drugs got them from a friend or relative, either for free, by purchasing them, or by stealing them. People who abuse prescription drugs also obtain them from other sources including “pill mills,” or illegitimate pain clinics; prescription fraud; pharmacy theft; illegal online pharmacies; and “doctor shopping”. Some individuals who use prescription drugs for non-medical reasons believe these substances are safer than illicit drugs because they are prescribed by a physician and dispensed by a pharmacist. Communities that develop partnerships with schools, healthcare providers, pharmacists, law enforcement and other sectors to educate families about the importance of monitoring, securing, and properly disposing of prescription drugs can reduce access to unused prescription drugs and increase the perception of harm of the abuse of prescription drugs.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Tennessee Department of Health Injury Prevention Program reports

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 93

7.1.2 Number of child safety seats disseminated through the LISSDEP network (Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Reduce non-fatal injury related hospitalizations for children ages 0 through 9 and adolescents ages 10 through 19.

Numerator: Number of child safety seats disseminated through the LISSDEP network

Denominator: n/a

Significance: This ESM was identified through the Title V needs assessment, Virginia's Well-being Plan, and Healthy People 2020 (IVP 1.2). Research from a variety of external sources indicates that child restraint and restraint systems reduce injury and injury severity in children.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Virginia Department of Health, Office of Family Health Services, Division of Prevention and Health Promotion (DPHP); the DPHP tracks the inventory disseminated

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100,000

7.1.2 Increase the number of certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians in the state. (Missouri)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians in the state.

Numerator: Number of certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians in the state.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Safe Kids Worldwide promotes changes in attitudes, behaviors, laws, and the environment to prevent accidental injury to children. Safe Kids has contributed to a 51 percent reduction in the U.S. child fatality rate from unintentional injury. The National Child Passenger Safety (CPS) Certification Training Program is a partnership between Safe Kids Worldwide, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the National CPS Board and program sponsor State Farm. As the Certifying Body, Safe Kids administers all aspects of CPS certification and maintains a directory of nationally certified CPS Technicians and Instructors. There are over 34,000 currently certified child passenger safety technicians and instructors worldwide. Safe Kids has also distributed more than 2.5 million bicycle helmets, 510,000 car seats and 250,000 smoke alarms to families in need, and checked 1.4 million car seats. Missouri has more than 600 coalitions in 23 counties, bringing together health and safety experts, educators, corporations, foundations, governments, and volunteers to educate and protect families. In August 1991, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) signed a contract with Safe Kids to form a state coalition to implement and facilitate accomplishment of common goals and objectives concerning childhood injury prevention. DHSS and safe kids Worldwide provide funding for 9 MO Safe kids Coalitions serving 53 counties.

Data Sources and Data Issues: An inter-agency agreement between the Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT) and the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services (DHSS).

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 3,000

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.