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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 1 through 20 (56 total).

5.1 To conduct the Direct on Scene Education (DOSE) Train-the-Trainer Program to first responders in order to reduce Alabama's high rate of unsafe sleep-related deaths in infants less than one year of age. (Alabama)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Train 50 percent of registered Emergency Medical Responders and Emergency Medical Technicians to conduct the Direct On Scene Education (DOSE) Program in local communities across Alabama.

Numerator: The number of licensed Emergency Medical Responders and Emergency Medical Technicians who have received DOSE training.

Denominator: The total number of Emergency Medical Responders and Emergency Medical Technicians licensed by the Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma in Alabama.

Significance: Training EMSC regional coordinators who can then train first responders within their region to conduct activities associated with the DOSE Program will provide the EMSC regional coordinators with tools necessary to assess and provide education related to reducing the risks of unsafe sleep environments in the homes of families with pregnant women and infants less than one year of age. Additionally, reducing sleep-related infant deaths would address three of the Healthy People 2020 goals: MICH-1.3: Reduce the rate of infant deaths from sudden unexpected infant death (includes SIDS, unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed). First responders have a unique opportunity that nurses, physicians, and other providers of care do not; namely, they are able to see families in their home environment and visually assess an infant's sleeping environment while educating, not just the mother, but the whole family, on ways to reduce risk factors associated with SIDS/SUID, asphyxia, suffocation, and/or strangulation.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Office of Emergency Medical Services reports Data Issues: EMSC data updated annually and may not account for new employees or changes in work certification status.

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 The percentage of infants delivered at birthing hospitals participating in the sleep sack program (Oklahoma)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of birthing hospitals participating in the safe sleep program

Numerator: The number of births occurring at birthing hospitals participating in the sleep sack program

Denominator: The number of resident live births

Significance: Providing a consistent message about infant sleep safety is essential to reducing sleep-related infant deaths. Hospital-based programs provide opportunities to give accurate and consistent infant safe sleep information to hospital staff and enable modeling of safe sleep practices. Increasing the number of birthing hospitals participating in the safe sleep program will directly increase the number of parents and caregivers receiving infant safe sleep education and the number of babies utilizing sleep sacks. This in turn will lead a reduction in infant deaths related to unsafe sleep conditions. Safe to Sleep Campaign. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Vital Statistics Data, Health Care Information, Center for Health Statistics, Oklahoma State Department of Health and MCH Sleep Sack Program

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Safe Sleep Parental Interviews (Maryland)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Conduct 50 parental interviews for Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) cases between January 2017 and December 2018 to inform safe sleep and SIDS prevention activities.

Numerator: Number of interviews conducted of parents who experienced a SUID loss.

Denominator: N/A- count

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the AAP has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. However, in 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. Among others, additional higher-level recommendations include breastfeeding and avoiding smoke exposure during pregnancy and after birth. These expanded recommendations have formed the basis of the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Safe to Sleep Campaign. MCHB has contracted with a vendor to conduct parental interviews for SUID cases to understand barriers to new parents adopting safe sleep recommendations, to direct future SIDS prevention efforts. MCHB's objective is to conduct 25 interviews annually in CYs 2017 and 2018.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCHB Data

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50

5.1 Safe sleep education and counseling for WIC and home visiting programs. (Virgin Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase percent of WIC participants and home visiting clients that received safe sleep counseling.

Numerator: WIC participants and MIECHV clients that received safe sleep counseling in the past year.

Denominator: WIC participants and MIECHV clients.

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the AAP has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. However, in 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. Among others, additional higher-level recommendations include breastfeeding and avoiding smoke exposure during pregnancy and after birth. These expanded recommendations have formed the basis of the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Safe to Sleep Campaign.

Data Sources and Data Issues: WIC Program; MIECHV Program

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Promote the complete Infant Safe Sleep Environment (no co-sleeping, on back, and no soft bedding) (New Jersey)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the use of the Infant Safe Sleep Environment (on co-sleeping, on back, no soft bedding)

Numerator: Mothers reporting Infant Safe Sleep Environment (no co-sleeping, on back, and no soft bedding) on the NJ PRAMS survey

Denominator: Mothers completing the NJ PRAMS survey

Significance: Tracking infant safe sleep practices using PRAMS data will inform the NJ DOH whether educational efforts to train health professionals and awareness campaigns targeting caregivers is having an impact on infant safe sleep practices. More information other than the percent of infants placed to sleep on their backs (NPM #5) is needed to ensure adherence to the complete Infant Safe Sleep message. Reporting NJ PRAMS data on co-sleeping and soft bedding in addition to on back would provide a more complete message on Infant Safe Sleep education.

Data Sources and Data Issues: NJ PRAMS Survey

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percentage of birth hospitals with a written safe sleep policy, including placing all infants to sleep on their back (New Hampshire)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of birth hospitals with a written safe sleep policy, including placing all infants to sleep on their back

Numerator: number of birth hospitals with a written safe sleep policy

Denominator: number of birth hospitals

Significance: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be put to sleep on their back to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS); also that health care professionals including hospital staff endorse, model and implement the safe sleep recommendations from birth.

Data Sources and Data Issues: NH DPHS Birth Hospital Survey, conducted every two years

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of new mothers who were told by a healthcare provider to place their baby on his/her back to sleep (Illinois)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To ensure that families are appropriately counseled on safe sleep practices by a healthcare provider after delivery

Numerator: # of new mothers reporting that a doctor, nurse, or other health care worker told them to place their baby on his/her back to sleep

Denominator: # live births

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. In Illinois, sleep-related deaths are of particular concern because the SUID-related infant mortality rate among non-Hispanic black infants is 4.5 times as high as that for non-Hispanic white infants. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the AAP has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to describe a broader safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. Additional risk reduction recommendations include breastfeeding and avoiding smoke exposure. These expanded recommendations have formed the basis of the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Safe to Sleep Campaign. This measure will identify whether new mothers are being appropriately counseled on safe sleep practices by healthcare providers. Several Illinois Title V strategies relate to this measure, including the toolkit developed by the Safe Sleep CoIIN team, and training for home visiting and case management staff. This ESM is related to the Healthy People 2020 objective MICH-20: Increase the proportion of infants placed to sleep on their backs. (Target: 75.9%) (Measure added July 2018 when NPM #5 was added to Illinois' selections)

Data Sources and Data Issues: Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS)

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of incorrectly coded SIDS/SUID deaths about which coroners are informed. (Louisiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To improve the accuracy of coroners in their reporting of infant deaths.

Numerator: number of SIDS/SUID deaths coded incorrectly on death certificates reported back to coroners

Denominator: number of incorrectly coded SIDS/SUID deaths

Significance: An increase in the number of accurately coded SIDS/SUID will guide necessary messaging and strategies needed to promote safe sleep. Within the State of Louisiana, coroners are elected. While the majority of the coroners have a medical background, this is not always the case, signaling a need to monitor and train the accuracy of coding on death certificates.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data derived from Vital records, autopsy reports, MCH Regional Coordinators, and death certificates. Coding will be identified as inaccurate by using the following definition of accuracy, consistent with the standards for accuracy defined by Louisiana Vital Records: (1) Record Unknown or Undetermined when the death cannot be explained and one of the following is unavailable: autopsy, death scene investigation or review of clinical history. (2) Record Accidental Suffocation and Strangulation in Bed (ASSB) when the death occurred in a sleep environment and may be due to overlay or roll over. The death may also be due to an object in the sleep environment including but not limited to bed linens, sheets, blankets, pillows, stuffed animals, or soft bedding. (3) Record Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS); when the death of an infant less than 1 year of age cannot be explained even after autopsy, death scene investigation and review of clinical history. All criteria must be met in order to classify the death as SIDS. In 2015, approximately 50% of coroners coded incorrectly. Half of these received training (25%).

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of in-state resident births occurring in hospitals that report having components of a Safe Sleep policy (Massachusetts)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of birth hospitals that implement safe sleep practices to reduce the incidence of SIDS

Numerator: Number of in-state resident infants who are born at hospitals that report having components of a Safe Sleep policy

Denominator: Total number of in-state resident births in Massachusetts

Significance: Nationally, SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 month-12 months. Implementing Safe Sleep Practices in the birthing hospital allows for modeling to, and education of parents on safe sleep practices before the mother and infant are discharged. This ESM is supported by the findings of the American Academy of Pediatrics (2011) SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Death: Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe Infant Environment, which includes interventions for improving behavior of medical and nursing staff. Further evidence is provided in Moon et al (2016) citing interventions including mandated safe sleep education in hospitals and in AMCHP Forging a Comprehensive Initiative to Improve Birth Outcomes and Reduce Infant Mortality: Policy and Program Options for State Planning (2012) to work with hospitals to create standard safe sleep curricula.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Bi-annual assessment of Massachusetts birthing hospitals for components of a Safe Sleep policy

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of birthing hospitals with current protocols that align with the American Academy of Pediatrics' Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment (Hawaii)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Educate mother and family to maintain a safe sleep position & environment for infants.

Numerator: Number of birthing hospitals with current AAP safe sleep protocols

Denominator: Total number of birthing hospitals

Significance: About 3,500 US infants die suddenly and unexpectedly each year. Theese deaths are referred to as sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID). SUID are one of the three leading causes of death among infants nationally and in Hawaii (Hayes DK, Calhoun CR, Byers TJ, Chock LR, Heu PL, Tomiyasu DW, Sakamoto DT, and Fuddy LJ. Saving Babies: Reducing Infant Mortality in Hawaii. Hawaii Journal of Medicine and Public Health. 2013. 72 (2): 246-251). Although the causes of death in many of these children can’t be explained, most occur while the infant is sleeping in an unsafe sleeping environment. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) expanded their recommendation to focus on safe sleep environments to reduce sleep related infant deaths. One recommendation is directed towards health care professionals, including staff in newborn nurseries and the NICU (AAP, 2011). Ensuring that current and consistent messages are provided by hospital staff to mothers in the hospital can influence infant safe sleep practices.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Safe Sleep Hawaii

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of birthing hospitals that are trained using the evidence-based curriculum for safe sleep education (West Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of birthing hospitals that are trained using the evidence-based curriculum for safe sleep education from 78% to 96% by 2020.

Numerator: Number of birthing hospitals in the state that have been trained using the “Say YES to Safe Sleep” curriculum

Denominator: Number of birthing hospitals in the state

Significance: Currently, 81% of births in WV occur in a birthing hospital that uses the “Say YES to Safe Sleep” curriculum to provide safe sleep education to new families. By increasing the number of birthing hospitals who are trained to use the curriculum, a greater percentage of the birth population will be reached with Safe Sleep education.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The number of birthing hospitals in the State is determined by state licensing. The number of hospitals that have been trained is collected from “Our Babies: Safe and Sound” project.

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Percent of Arkansas birthing hospitals that have adopted the safe sleep toolkit (Arkansas)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the percent of birthing hospitals that have adopted the ADH safe sleep toolkit

Numerator: Number of birthing hospitals that have adopted the ADH safe sleep toolkit

Denominator: Number of birthing hospitals that have been trained about the ADH safe sleep toolkit

Significance: In Arkansas, suffocation is the leading cause of injury-related deaths for children less than one year old. SIDS remains a significant contributor to infant mortality in Arkansas. Tennessee has shown that they could cut their SIDS rate in half by an intensive education campaign of parents through their birthing hospitals. It is our hope that, by initiating a similar effort, the SIDS rate in Arkansas will decrease.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Program information

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Number of safe sleep trainings and awareness activities across South Carolina made available in Partner with the South Carolina Safe Sleep Coalition. (South Carolina)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase safe sleep training opportunities and awareness activities across the state.

Numerator: Number of trainings and awareness activities conducted in collaboration with the South Carolina Safe Sleep Coalition.

Denominator: 1

Significance: There are many partners at work to conduct safe sleep trainings across South Carolina through the state Safe Sleep Coalition. This method ensures statewide reach for consistent safe sleep messaging while engaging the partners at work in this area.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Children's Trust of SC Program Data

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10

5.1 Number of safe sleep educational material distributed (Tennessee)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of safe sleep educational materials distributed

Numerator: Number of safe sleep educational materials distributed

Denominator: n/a

Significance: Safe sleep educational materials play an important role in educating new parents and caregivers about ways to keep babies safe while sleeping. In 2014, there were 99 infant deaths that resulted from an unsafe sleep environment, account for approximately 18% of all infant deaths. By focusing on distributing safe sleep educational materials can increase the awareness to put babies into safe sleep environment and decrease the sleep-related infant death and reduce the overall infant mortality rate.

Data Sources and Data Issues: TDH FHW child fatality review program data

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 300,000

5.1 Number of safe sleep educational books and resources distributed to families in all birthing hospitals. (Mississippi)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase safe sleep educational awareness to providers, MSDH staff and community partners.

Numerator: Number of safe sleep educational books and resources distributed to families in all birthing hospitals.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The number of U.S. sleep-related Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) cases, including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), is approximately 3,500 deaths per year. Since the Back to Sleep campaign launched in 1994, the overall U.S. SIDS rate declined by more than 60%; the proportion of infants placed on their backs to sleep increased from 27% in 1993 to 74% in 2011. Strategies to increase the percentage of infants usually placed to sleep on their backs include supporting the implementation of safe sleep practices through policies, accreditation, and legislation. .

Data Sources and Data Issues: MSDH Infant Health Program

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100,000

5.1 Number of MN hospitals with national Safe Sleep Hospital Certification (Minnesota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of hospitals in MN with national Safe Sleep Hospital certification

Numerator: Number of Minnesota Hospitals that meet the requirements to become safe sleep certified at any level (Bronze, Silver, or Gold)

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The National Hospital Safe Sleep Certification Program is an initiative of Crib for Kids that recognizes hospitals for demonstrating leadership around infant safe sleep practices and education and for modeling safe sleep. Safe sleep modeling occurs when hospitals develop, implement, maintain and enforce a safe sleep policy that aims to prevent sleep-related injuries and deaths, and staff in turn serve as role models for safe sleep by intentionally conveying messages and cues to parents that promote sleep safety for infants. Because parents/caregivers tend to imitate the behaviors and practices they observe in the hospital later on at home, it is important that all birthing hospitals in Minnesota seek certification through the national certification program. By participating in this initiative, Minnesota-based birthing hospitals will be required to: (1) develop, implement, and maintain a safe sleep policy based on the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) safe sleep recommendations, (2) provide safe sleep training for staff, and (3) offer safe sleep counseling to parents/caregivers prior to discharge. The program was developed based on a growing body of evidence to suggest that parents are more likely to follow safe sleep practices after discharge when they observe safe sleep modeling in hospitals or receive safe sleep education from hospital staff.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Cribs for Kids Website - https://cribsforkids.org/safe-sleep-hospital-certification/

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

5.1 Number of individuals who participated in safe sleep training (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of community members, families, and professionals trained in safe sleep practices in order to reduce infant sleep-related deaths by improving safe sleep practices among parents.

Numerator: Number of individuals who participated in safe sleep training

Denominator: Not Applicable

Significance: Approximately 3,500 infants die of sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) in the U.S. each year. Fourteen fatalities occurred as a result of SUIDs in Idaho in 2017 (Idaho Vital Statistics, 2018). Most SUIDs cases occur while the infant is sleeping in an unsafe sleep environment. SUIDs deaths include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), defined as death in an infant less than 1-year old that cannot be explained even after a thorough investigation, unknown causes, accidental suffocation, and strangulation in bed. Accidental suffocation can be caused by soft bedding, bed sharing with another person, and when an infant becomes wedged between a mattress and a wall or bed frame. Infant strangulation can occur when an infant’s head and neck become wedged in between crib railings or becomes caught in bedding or a blanket (CDC, 2016). The objectives of safe sleep programs are to improve parental education regarding the sleep safety of their infants in order to reduce incidences of SUIDs. Successful methods for improving parent safe sleep knowledge range from hospital staff education to crib distribution programs. Such efforts have been shown to increase parental knowledge, reduce bed-sharing rates, increase supine sleeping rates, and decrease incidences of SIDS.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Through Memorandum of Understanding with Ada County Paramedics

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 5,000

5.1 Number of hospitals with bronze (or higher) certification for Cribs for Kids (Maine)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Expand the Cribs for Kids program which promotes safe sleep practice in hospitals and at home.

Numerator: Number of hospitals with bronze (or higher) certification for Cribs for Kids

Denominator: NA

Significance: The Cribs for Kids National Safe Sleep Hospital Certification program recognizes hospitals that demonstrate a commitment to reducing infant sleep-related deaths. The program promotes safe sleep practices and educates on infant sleep safety. According to the Cribs for Kids website: “By becoming certified, a hospital is demonstrating that it is committed to being a community leader and is pro-actively eliminating as many sleep-related deaths as possible.” Maine’s POEC will work with birthing hospitals to tell them about the Cribs for Kids certification and encourage them to take the steps needed to get certified.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Source: Cribs for Kids website The Cribs for Kids website has a map that indicates the hospitals that have received different levels of certification. As of June 2016, 3 hospitals in Maine were certified; two have gold certification and one has silver certification.

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 15

5.1 Number of hospitals that have implemented safe infant sleep polices. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of North Dakota hospitals that have implemented a safe infant sleep policy.

Numerator: Number of North Dakota hospitals that have a safe infant sleep policy in place.

Denominator: Number of North Dakota hospitals with a safe infant sleep policy by 2022.

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. However, in 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. Among others, additional higher-level recommendations include breastfeeding and avoiding smoke exposure during pregnancy and after birth. These expanded recommendations have formed the basis of the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Safe to Sleep Campaign. Healthcare providers including hospital staff must role model implementation of safe sleep guidelines. It is essential that hospitals that provide care to mothers and infants institute strategies for education of hospital personnel and policies and procedures that promote safe infant sleep practices.

Data Sources and Data Issues: North Dakota Department of Health – Survey of Birthing Hospitals. Survey data maintained by the Infant and Child Death Services Program Director. Note: The data is collected based on federal fiscal year (October through September).

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 12

5.1 Number of hospitals recruited to implement the model safe sleep program. (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Annually increase the number of hospitals that have been recruited to implement the model safe sleep program.

Numerator: The number of hospitals that have committed to implementing the model safe sleep program within the next year.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: The number of hospitals that have committed to implementing the model safe sleep program will foreshadow the reach of the program in the coming year.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be collected from quarterly reports from the Infant Safe Sleep Initiative. An applicant has been selected; however, a grant agreement is pending for programming that will begin July 1, 2016. Due to the Infant Safe Sleep Initiative being a three year grant, projections are not being made past the grant period as future programming is undetermined at this time.

Year: 2017/2019

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.