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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Find State ESMs


Displaying records 21 through 40 (58 total).

ESM 5.1 Parent-Child Interaction (Rhode Island)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=home+visit&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of families that have an annual parent-child interaction assessment

Numerator: Primary caregivers enrolled in home visiting who receive an observation of caregiver-child interaction by the home visitor using a validated tool

Denominator: Primary caregivers enrolled in home visiting

Significance: MIECHV provides evidence-based home visiting services to at-risk women and caregivers with young children to improve the lives of children and families. Healthy Families America used the CHEERS Check-In tool- that is a tool developed by the national Healthy Families America office that has been tested and validated. Nurse-Family Partnership uses the DANCE and similar to HFA that is a tool that the Nurse-Family Partnership National Service Office requires NFP sites to use. Parents as Teachers uses the Infant/Toddler Home Observation Measurement of the Environment (HOME).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Efforts to Outcomes Home Visiting Database

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 % of PRAMS moms who report having a home visit and report their baby sleeps on a separate approved sleep surface (Wyoming)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=home+visit&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the % of PRAMS respondents who received a home visit, who put their infants to sleep on a separate, approved surface.

Numerator: # of women reporting their infant is put to sleep on a separate approved sleep surface

Denominator: # of women reporting having a home visit since their baby was born.

Significance: This will help us better understand the impact of the home visitation program on safe sleep behaviors as well as better understanding who is participating in the home visitation program.

Data Sources and Data Issues: PRAMS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 % of Child Death Review (CDR) team members who scored above 80% on a post-test (South Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Determine the effectiveness of training provided to CDR team members by measuring the % of team members who scored above 80% on a training post-test.

Numerator: # of CDR team members who scored above 80% on a post-test

Denominator: # of CDR team members who took post-test

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side or stomach sleep positions, the AAP has long recommended the back to sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment to include use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing) and without loose bedding.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Manual tally of post-test scores

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 Number of safe sleep-related activities that are implemented by local Simple County health departments. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=county+health+department&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2025, a total of 9 sleep-related activities are completed by distinct local Simple County health departments.

Numerator: Number of sleep related activities by local Simple County health departments

Denominator: None

Significance: ADHS provides funding to Simple County health departments to implement programs that address our state priority needs and selected National Performance Measures (NPMs). This ESM is meant to capture all activities that the local Simple County health departments are working on to impact the NPM.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Healthy Arizona Families IGA Data

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 Number of safe sleep educational books and resources distributed to families in all birthing hospitals. (Mississippi)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy 5.1 "Caregiver Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-1.php). Find other NPM 5 caregiver-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase safe sleep educational awareness to providers, MSDH staff and community partners by 1% in the next year.

Numerator: Number of safe sleep educational books and resources distributed to families in all birthing hospitals.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The number of U.S. sleep-related Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) cases, including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), is approximately 3,500 deaths per year. Since the Back to Sleep campaign launched in 1994, the overall U.S. SIDS rate declined by more than 60%; the proportion of infants placed on their backs to sleep increased from 27% in 1993 to 74% in 2011. Strategies to increase the percentage of infants usually placed to sleep on their backs include supporting the implementation of safe sleep practices through policies, accreditation, and legislation. .

Data Sources and Data Issues: MSDH Infant Health Program

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100,000

ESM 5.1 Number of professionals trained to recognize, identify, and model safe sleep environments (Louisiana)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Health Care Provider Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-3.php). Find other NPM 5 provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To increase the number of professionals who provide evidence-based safe sleep practices advice to caregivers of infants

Numerator: Number of professionals trained annually

Denominator: N/A

Significance: A 2019 analysis of 2016 National Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data identified provider advice as an important, modifiable factor to improve caregiver safe sleep practices. Hirai, Ashley H., et al. "Prevalence and factors associated with safe infant sleep practices." Pediatrics 144.5 (2019).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data derived from documentation during trainings of the number of professionals in attendance.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 10,000

ESM 5.1 Number of individuals who participated in safe sleep training (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Caregiver/Parent Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-1.php), "Health Care Provider Eduation" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-3.php) and "Child Care Provider Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-2.php). Find other NPM 5 caregiver/provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the number of community members, families, and professionals trained in safe sleep practices in order to reduce infant sleep-related deaths by improving safe sleep practices among parents.

Numerator: Number of individuals who participated in safe sleep training

Denominator: Not Applicable

Significance: Approximately 3,500 infants die of sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) in the U.S. each year. Fourteen fatalities occurred as a result of SUIDs in Idaho in 2017 (Idaho Vital Statistics, 2018). Most SUIDs cases occur while the infant is sleeping in an unsafe sleep environment. SUIDs deaths include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), defined as death in an infant less than 1-year old that cannot be explained even after a thorough investigation, unknown causes, accidental suffocation, and strangulation in bed. Accidental suffocation can be caused by soft bedding, bed sharing with another person, and when an infant becomes wedged between a mattress and a wall or bed frame. Infant strangulation can occur when an infant’s head and neck become wedged in between crib railings or becomes caught in bedding or a blanket (CDC, 2016). The objectives of safe sleep programs are to improve parental education regarding the sleep safety of their infants in order to reduce incidences of SUIDs. Successful methods for improving parent safe sleep knowledge range from hospital staff education to crib distribution programs. Such efforts have been shown to increase parental knowledge, reduce bed-sharing rates, increase supine sleeping rates, and decrease incidences of SIDS.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Through Memorandum of Understanding with Ada Simple County Paramedics

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 5,000

ESM 5.1 Number of families provided with a crib and safe sleep education through Cribs for Kids (Ohio)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Moderate. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Mass Media-National Campaign" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-6.php). Find other NPM 5 family-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of infants who sleep in a safe sleep environment.

Numerator: Number of families who were provided a crib and safe sleep education through the Cribs for Kids program.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths are the third leading cause of infant death in Ohio. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Reported by local grantees

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 10,000

ESM 5.1 Number of culturally appropriate translations of material created for populations at risk of infant mortality. (South Carolina)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=language&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To develop and promote culturally appropriate safe sleep messaging, education and counseling across SC in languages other than English and Spanish.

Numerator: Number of additional translations

Denominator: Number of additional translations

Significance: Safe sleep messaging should reach all populations, regardless of language spoken, in order to impact sleep-related infant mortality.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH Program in collaboration with multi-sector partners

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 123,456

ESM 5.1 Number of cribs distributed through the Cribs for Kids for Community Partners MCH Evidence Informed Strategy (Kentucky)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Moderate. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Mass Media: National Campaigns" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-6.php). Find other NPM 5 family-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Decrease by 5% (current 21% for 2018 PRAMS data) the percent of PRAMS reporting mothers who place their infants in non-back sleep positioning by September 30, 2025.

Numerator: The number of cribs distributed by local health departments through the Cribs for Kids for Community Partners package

Denominator: None

Significance: Kentucky's rate of infant deaths due to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death in 2013 was 1.6 per 1,000 live births, an increase from 1.24 in 2012. In 2013, SUID was the second most common cause of infant deaths in Kentucky, and 90% of SUID cases had at least one sleep-related risk factor. Sleep positioning is one of these risk factors.By working with community partners for distribution, MCH is able to leverage funds to purchase more cribs and reach more families for distribution of a safe sleep environment for use along with safe sleep education from trusted sources.

Data Sources and Data Issues: REDCap Reporting to the Division of Maternal and Child Health for MCH Evidence Informed Strategies. Data is reported on a monthly basis.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 50,000

ESM 5.1 Number of community education opportunities Title V agencies provide education about safe sleep environments each year (Iowa)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=community+education&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Provide evidence based training opportunities for state and local partners/contractors on the importance and best practices on the topic of safe sleep.

Numerator: Number of training opportunities provided on the topic of safe sleep

Denominator: NA

Significance: Increasing the knowledge of staff on the importance and best practices of safe sleep will ensure the education being provided to maternal health clients is up to date and evidence based.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Title V state and local reporting

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 50

ESM 5.1 Number of CDR recommendations implemented annually (infant health) (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=death+review&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Implement recommendations that are provided from the Child Death Review Team on infant deaths and SUID related deaths in order to inform infant programming

Numerator: The number of recommendations implemented

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Data from Child Death Review can inform providers and systems of care on the need for targeted interventions to reduce the rate of infant death.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will come from infant program areas that review and implement recommendations.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 10

ESM 5.1 Increase the number of Maternal Infant Health Program agencies that have staff trained to use the concepts of motivational interviewing with safe sleep (Michigan)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy 5.3 "Health Care Provider Training" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-3.php). Find other NPM 5 Provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 8. Build and support a workforce

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: Improvements in how home visitors talk to families about infant safe sleep will lead to improvements in parent behavior, with the ultimate goal to reduce the number of sudden unexpected infant deaths.

Numerator: N/A - this is a Simple Count

Denominator: N/A - this is a Simple Count

Significance: Positively impacting parental behavior requires addressing known barriers to implementing safe sleep practices: parental knowledge and misconceptions, preference and situation; social determinants of health; and family practices and culture. Increased skills by MIHP providers on how to promote behavior change will increase the likelihood families will follow the safe sleep guidelines. MIHP agencies serve approximately 20,000 pregnant moms on Medicaid annually. Targeting MIHP providers helps to reach the most high-risk mothers and families.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Maternal Infant Health Program (MIHP). MIHP Agencies provide the data after staff have completed the training Helping Families Practice Infant Safe Sleep (Safe Sleep 201).

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 Increase education and awareness on the "ABC's" of safe-sleep (Palau)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Caregiver Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-1.php). Find other NPM 5 caregiver-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 3. Inform and educate the public

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Maintain at least 95% of pregnant women who are made aware and educated on the "ABC's" of Safe-Sleep

Numerator: Number of pregnant women who are educated on the "ABC's" of Safe-Sleep

Denominator: Number of pregnant women in the given year

Significance: With Palau's customary practices, Palauan women are taught to sleep with their newborn on the same bed or put their infant to bed on their stomach. It is evident that 8% of women still placed their infant to sleep on their stomach.

Data Sources and Data Issues: PPRASS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.1 Complete community assessments and infant mortality prevention strategic plans in Healthy Texas Mothers and Babies (HTMB) Coalition communities (Texas)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base for this NPM to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 1. Assess and monitor population health

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To complete community assessments and infant mortality prevention strategic plans in HTMB Coalition communities with excess sleep-related infant deaths.

Numerator: Yes: 4 local community assessments and infant mortality prevention plans are completed per year through FY2019 No: Less than 4 assessments and plans are completed per year

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Disparities in feto-infant mortality persist across the state. HTMB-CCs are recruited from geographic areas identified through PPOR mapping to have excess deaths in one or more PPOR when compared to a state reference group. Currently participating HTMB-CCs, and organizations to be recruited for development of additional HTMB-CCs are based within areas previously determined to have excess deaths in the Infant Period of Risk (POR). This POR includes deaths occurring among infants in the postneonatal period (between 28 days and 1 year) and born weighing >1500 grams. While not all deaths that occur in the Infant POR are sleep-related, SIDS is the leading cause of postneonatal infant death. Risk for sleep-related deaths—including SIDS, ill-defined deaths, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed—may be decreased by decreasing intrinsic and extrinsic risks, as discussed in a recent commentary by Moon RY and Hauck FR—SIDS Risk: It's More Than Just the Sleep Environment (Pediatrics.2016;137(1): e20153665). Recommendations to address known modifiable risks are described in the AAP TASK FORCE ON SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME’s Policy Statement—SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Updated 2016 Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment (Pediatrics. 2016;138(5):e20162938) and the rationale for the recommendations is provided in the Task Force’s corresponding Technical Report (Moon RY et al. Pediatrics. 2016;138(5):e20162940). DSHS will work with HTMB-CCs to assess community needs related to feto-infant mortality and to develop locally-relevant strategic plans to address identified priorities. DSHS anticipates that some HTMB-CCs will identify priorities related to sleep-related death and will develop strategies to address intrinsic and extrinsic risks for these deaths. Ongoing customized technical assistance, capacity building, training and evaluation support will be provided to HTMB CCs for optimal coordination, synergy, collaboration and impact.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: HTMB Evaluation Reports HTMB currently supports four (4) Community Coalitions (HTMB-CCs) and an additional 4 will be recruited in FY2018 to strengthen local perinatal infrastructure, assess community needs and priorities, and develop, implement and evaluate initiatives within their communities to reduce disparities in preterm birth and feto-infant morbidity and mortality. DSHS expects to identify a HTMB Technical Assistance Contractor (HTMB-TAC) in early FY18 to support HTMB-CCs with local community health assessment to include: • Operational definition of the community of interest; • Target population demographics, geographic data, socio-economic data, maternal, fetal and infant health and mortality data, racial/ethnic disparities, and community health status information; • Rapid assessment of relevant community perinatal knowledge, attitudes and practices; • Gaps, barriers and strengths of local health services and provider characteristics; • Partners’ organizational capacity, levels of commitment, and operational strengths and potential areas of contribution to CC goals; • Opportunities to engage new and non-traditional partners; and • Current locally implemented strategies and interventions relevant to infant mortality. The HTMB-TAC will support each HTMB-CC in developing a strategic plan to address excess feto-infant mortality. The 4 currently contracted HTMB-CCs are expected to draft assessments and plans in FY2018. The additional 4 HTMB-CCs will begin assessment and planning processes in FY2018 that are anticipated to continue into FY2019. Data issues: Achievement is contingent on successful and timely development and execution of contracts; no issues are anticipated.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

ESM 5.1 At the time of follow-up, percent of safe crib program clients who were placing their baby in a safe sleep environment. (Missouri)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percent of safe crib program clients who were placing their baby in a safe sleep environment.

Numerator: At the time of follow-up, number of mothers reporting that they most often place their baby in a safe sleep environment

Denominator: Number of Safe crib program clients participated in follow-up visit

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/5/1030

Data Sources and Data Issues: MO DHSS Safe Cribs Program

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.2 Percent of Kansas Perinatal Community Collaboratives (KPCC) participants who placed their infants to sleep (B) in a crib/bassinet or portable crib (Kansas)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=collaborative&NPM=5&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/5-safe-sleep.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the percent of infants placed to sleep on their backs and on a separate approved surface, without soft objects or loose bedding

Numerator: B) Mothers reporting that their baby sleeps in a crib/bassinet, or portable crib

Denominator: Infants with information reported

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side (lateral) or stomach (prone) sleep positions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has long recommended the back (supine) sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment that includes use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing), and without loose bedding. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/5/1030

Data Sources and Data Issues: Kansas Perinatal Community Collaborative (KPCC)/Becoming a Mom (BaM) Birth Outcome Card

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.2 Percent of families enrolled in a home visitation program who received safe sleep education from a trained home visitation provider on the first visit after child’s birth (West Virginia)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Caregiver/Parent Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-1.php). Find other NPM 5 caregiver-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Provide Safe Sleep education on the first visit after child’s birth to 88% of families enrolled in a home visitation program

Numerator: Number of families (with a child less than 1 year) enrolled in a home visitation program who received safe sleep education on the first visit after child’s birth from a trained home visitor

Denominator: Number of families enrolled in a home visitation program with a child aged less than 1 year during the reporting period

Significance: Increasing the number of families who receive Safe Sleep education will help to reach those families who did not receive the education in the hospital and will also serve to reinforce the message for those families who did receive the education prior to hospital discharge. Many families feel more comfortable having conversations and asking questions with their trusted home visitor with whom they have built a good relationship. Safe Sleep education delivered during home visits will help to overcome barriers related to safe sleep practices.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be collected from WV Home Visitation Programs.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.2 % of PRAMS moms who report having a home visit and report their baby sleeps without soft objects or loose bedding (Wyoming)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the % of moms, who report a home visit, who put infant to sleep without soft objects or loose bedding.

Numerator: # of women responding their infant is put to sleep without soft objects or loose bedding

Denominator: # of women reporting having a home visit since their baby was born.

Significance: This will help us better understand the impact of the home visitation program on safe sleep behaviors as well as better understanding who is participating in the home visitation program.

Data Sources and Data Issues: PRAMS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 5.2 % of in-home daycares who responded to survey and indicate that they follow safe sleep guidelines (South Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "Child Care Provider Education" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/5-2.php). Find other NPM 5 child care provider-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 4. Support and mobilize partners

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Collaborate with diverse, multi-sector organizations/agencies to promote safe sleep by providing safe sleep materials to in-home daycares and measuring the % of in-home daycares who respond to a survey and indicate they follow safe sleep guidelines

Numerator: # of in-home daycares who respond to survey and indicate they follow safe sleep guidelines

Denominator: # of in-home daycares who respond to survey

Significance: Sleep-related infant deaths, also called Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), are the leading cause of infant death after the first month of life and the third leading cause of infant death overall. Sleep-related SUIDs include Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unknown cause, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Due to heightened risk of SIDS when infants are placed to sleep in side or stomach sleep positions, the AAP has long recommended the back to sleep position. In 2011, AAP expanded its recommendations to help reduce the risk of all sleep-related deaths through a safe sleep environment to include use of the back-sleep position, on a separate firm sleep surface (room-sharing without bed sharing) and without loose bedding.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Survey distributed to in-home daycares

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.