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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Displaying records 21 through 40 (49 total).

10.2 The percent of youths in schools and communities reached with the PR Youth Health Literacy Toolkit that increase their awareness regarding how to use the health care system (pre-post survey) by September 2017-2021 (ongoing) (Puerto Rico)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 4: measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: By Sept 2017, 50% of youths reached with the PR Youth Health Literacy Toolkit increased their awareness regarding how to use the health care system.

Numerator: The number of youth surveyed after receiving PR-YHLT with increased perception of how to use the healthcare system.

Denominator: The number of youth reached with the PR- YHLT.

Significance: The patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, defines health literacy as the degree to which an individual has the capacity to obtain, communicate, process and understand health information and services to make the appropriate health decisions. Young people need to be empowered to make informed and appropriate decisions about health, including attending the annual health visit and participate in treatments. Cultural competency is vital in the implementation of public health initiatives. The development of a culturally competent PR Youth Health Literacy Toolkit will help to empower Puertorrican youths about health including the importance to attend the annual health visit using PR cultural context and specific situations. The development of this toolkit will incorporate the experience from the piloting programs with YHPs island wide.

Data Sources and Data Issues: PRYHLT Pre and post intervention surveys.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 The number of health professionals trained and informed to promote the practice of going beyond the sports physical (Oregon)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to professionals

Goal: To promote practice of going beyond sports physicals.

Numerator: The number of health professionals who receive training or information about the differences and comparative strengths between the adolescent well visit and the sports physical, and are trained to use the Oregon Sports Pre-Participation Examination (

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The adolescent well visit and PPE serve student athletes in different ways: the well visit has a stronger emphasis on development and overall health and well-being, while the PPE has focused screening for medical conditions or injuries (primarily cardiovascular and musculoskeletal, respectively) which may be worsened by athletic activity. Therefore, schools and providers should encourage student athletes to complete both evaluations as recommended. With that said, there is enough overlap that one could complete both assessments at the same time if possible. Providing information to providers that compares the assessments and highlights the need for both can limit a student’s absence from school/sport and ensure all aspects of a student’s health are examined.

Data Sources and Data Issues: State tracking

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 2,000

10.2 The degree to which the South Dakota Title V program has implemented evidence-based or informed strategies to increase the percent of adolescents with an annual preventive medical visit. (South Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Improve and assure appropriate access to health services and promote positive child and youth development to reduce morbidity and mortality; and promote oral health

Numerator: Rating on implementation of each strategy on a scale of one to three. Each rating is added together for a combined score.

Denominator: Total number of strategies multiplied by three (highest rating possible)

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors, such as unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and substance use, is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. An annual preventive well visit may help adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health-damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. The Bright Futures guidelines recommend that adolescents have an annual checkup from age 11 through 21. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, immunizations, and discussion of health-related behaviors including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety.

Data Sources and Data Issues: South Dakota MCH developed data collection form

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 # QI cycles completed by participating practices (Wyoming)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of QI cycles completed by participating practices

Numerator: Number of QI cycles completed by participating practices (A QI cycle is defined as the eighteen month period of the ACE assessment process on one identified topic)

Denominator: N/A

Significance: The Adolescent Health Program will partner with the University of Michigan to bring the Adolescent Champion Model to Wyoming. The goal of this program is to train adolescent and family providers and their staffs to create a more adolescent friendly environment in their clinics. By increasing the knowledge of providers and their staffs of caring for adolescents is that more adolescents will receive their recommended annual well visit.

Data Sources and Data Issues: University of Michigan and Program Data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Percentage of adolescents, ages 10 through 19, receiving school-based preventive health services. (Virgin Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percentage of students receiving school based preventive health care services in the school setting.

Numerator: 590

Denominator: 11803

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. Risky behaviors often initiated in adolescence include unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and use of substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs. Receiving health care services, including annual adolescent preventive well visits, helps adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. Receipt of services can help prepare adolescents to manage their health and health care as adults. The Bright Futures guidelines recommends that adolescents have an annual checkup starting at age 11. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, discussion of health‐related behaviors, and immunizations. It recommends that the annual checkup include discussion of several health‐related topics, including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Title V Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Percent of public middle and high schools visited to deliver pregnancy & STI prevention program (Federated States of Micronesia)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase educational awareness on sexual health (teen pregnancy and STI) to adolescents ages 12-17 years old in public schools on main islands.

Numerator: Number of public middle and high schools visited with completed delivery of pregnancy & STI prevention program

Denominator: Number of public middle and high schools.

Significance: Women who become pregnant during their teens are at increased risk for medical complications, such as premature labor, and social consequences.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH and Department of Education

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Percent of adolescents 12 through 17 with a behavioral health screening at the time of medical visit at all school-based health centers (Connecticut)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase the percent of adolescents 12-17 who receive behavioral health screenings during a preventive medical visit.

Numerator: Number of students 12-17 who had a behavioral health screening during a medical visit at all School Based Health Centers (All visits)

Denominator: Number of students 12-17 who received a medical visit at all School Based Health Centers (All visits)

Significance: The 2017 Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care (Periodicity Schedule) have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and represents a consensus of AAP and the Bright Futures Periodicity Schedule Workgroup. Each child and family is unique; therefore, these recommendations are designed for the care of children who are receiving competent parenting, have no manifestations of any important health problems, and are growing and developing in a satisfactory fashion. Developmental, psychosocial, and chronic disease issues for children and adolescents may require frequent counseling and treatment visits separate from preventive care visits. Additional visits also may become necessary if circumstances suggest variations from normal.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Funded School Based Health Centers database and annual contractual program reports. We are using “well visit” as the preventive medical visit. CDC Youth Risk Assessment Survey. Annual School Based Health Centers Behavioral Health Results Based Accountability Report Cards.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Percent of adolescent program participants (15-18 years of age) that received education on the importance of a well-visit in the past year (Guam)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To ensure that adolescent program participants are receiving education on the importance of a well-visit

Numerator: Number of adolescent program participants (age 15-18 years) who have received education on the importance of a well / preventive health visit in the reporting year

Denominator: Number of adolescent program participants (age 15-18 years)

Significance: Adolescence is an important period of development physically, psychologically, and socially. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they are responsible for their health, including an annual preventive well visit which helps to maintain a healthy lifestyle, avoid risky behaviors, manage chronic conditions and prevent disease.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Child Health Clinic Report

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Number of youth receiving services at a Health Resource Center (HRC). (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number annually of youth ages 12-17 utilizing HRC services.

Numerator: Number of youth ages 12-17 receiving services at an HRC.

Denominator: Not applicable.

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. Risky behaviors often initiated in adolescence include unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and use of substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs. Receiving health care services, including annual adolescent preventive well visits, helps adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. Receipt of services can help prepare adolescents to manage their health and health care as adults. Adolescents face many concerns when deciding where to seek sexual-health services. Access to care is important to youth, and when trying to seek care at a primary care physician or clinic, issues may include: “lack of transportation; difficulties making appointments; not knowing where to go; hours and days when services are available; and requirements to return for follow-up.” The HRCs fill this primary care gap by being available and accessible in the schools youth attend and in the communities where they reside. Expanding the number of HRCs in the state will expand availability of vital health services for youth. Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth face unique barriers to care, including confidentiality around their sexual identity and the fear of being “outed”, as well as judgment from health care workers once their sexual orientation is disclosed.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data collection and analysis will be performed by the Grantee that subcontracts with schools and community organizations for the HRCs that are established. It will be a grant deliverable as required by the work statement and reported to DOH via quarterly reports.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 10,000

10.2 Number of youth engagement activities to improve adolescent and young adult (AYA) preventive care utilization and quality (Minnesota)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Increase number of MDH activities that engage youth representatives in planning, implementation, and evaluation of strategies to increase utilization and quality of adolescent and young adult (AYA) preventive visits

Numerator: Number of youth engagement activities

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Title V work will engage young people who representative of Minnesota communities to help develop effective messaging, marketing, and other strategies to improve youth-centered services and to increase utilization and quality of adolescent and young adult preventive care visits. Examples of planned activities include: developing annual plans with youth representatives to serve on the Adolescent and Young Adult Health CoIIN team; engaging youth to do clinic visits to identify improvements for youth-friendly services as part of a clinic QI project; having youth representatives develop or review AYA preventive health documents or resources; and/or incorporating results of youth surveys into preventive health policy and practice. Adolescents and young adults are the least likely to access preventive health care, typically only accessing care for illness and sports physicals. Visits for Child and Teen Checkups (Minnesota’s EPSDT program) go down as kids grow into adolescence and young adulthood – both in Minnesota and nationwide, Medicaid and non-Medicaid. Why these rates go down is not clear, but may be due to comprehensive health and developmental/mental health screening not being required for middle school or high school entry, unlike for kindergarten entry in Minnesota. Also, after the age of 11 or 12 years, there are no required vaccines for school entry, which also may decrease visits to clinics for well-visits. Also, based on focus groups and other research, the concept of preventive care for youth is not understood, valued, or high priority for either young people or their parents. This leaves us to determine what type of outreach and messaging to young people, and to their parents/family, may be most effective in getting them in for care. Engaging young people in Title V work is expected to increase the effectiveness of any strategy undertaken to improve preventive care utilization and quality.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Child and Adolescent Health unit tracking sheet. Number = number of specific activities implemented to engage adolescents or young adults in Title V efforts to improve utilization and quality of adolescent health visits.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 30

10.2 Number of public schools implementing the PATCH for Teens curriculum as part of their Health Education Curriculum (Vermont)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Youth choose healthy behaviors and thrive.

Numerator: Number of public schools implementing the PATCH program

Denominator: Number of public schools implementing the PATCH program

Significance: The PATCH (Providers and Teens Communicating for Health) program provides school health educators, health-related professionals, youth workers, and other adults the materials and resources needed to teach young people about their rights and responsibilities in health care settings. Learning objectives include: Students will understand the importance of learning to manage their own health care experiences; Students will learn how to advocate for their own health and well being in health care settings; Students will explore steps they can take to make sure they get the care they need and deserve. The main messages of the program are: Teens need and deserve a good relationship with their health care providers; Teens have legal health care rights; Teens have a personal responsibility to learn to manage their own health care.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Program data

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Number of OPH-affiliated SBHCs assessed according to national best practices in providing adolescent-friendly care (Louisiana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of OPH-affiliated SBHCs providing adolescent-friendly care according to national best practices.

Numerator: This is a count of School-Based Health Centers assessed.

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Assessing the Parish Health Units and School-Based Health Centers for their level of adolescent-friendliness will lead to more targeted improvement strategies. This may lead to an increase in the number of Parish Health Units and School Based Health Centers that are adolescent-friendly and therefore an increase in the number of adolescents served.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Self-reported based on annual progress and survey completion.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 200

10.2 Number of high schools covered by Immunization School Outreach Program. (American Samoa)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2020, increase percent of adolescents ages 12 – 14 years (6-8 grade students) with HPV vaccination coverage to 76%.

Numerator: Number of high schools covered by Immunization School Outreach Program.

Denominator: Total number of schools.

Significance: Vaccines save lives. Vaccine-preventable diseases can cause long-term illness, hospitalization, and even death. Skipping vaccines can leave you vulnerable to illnesses such as influenza (flu), pneumococcal disease, and shingles. Vaccines also protect against diseases like human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B

Data Sources and Data Issues: Immunization Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Number of healthcare clinics implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2020, recruit a minimum of six (6) healthcare clinics in implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites.

Numerator: Number of healthcare clinics implementing the University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model.

Denominator: None

Significance: During Arizona's needs assessment process, the community identified promotion of preventive visits and services as a priority for adolescents. While adolescents are generally a healthy population, preventive visits are important to identify and educate about at-risk health conditions or behaviors. Preventive visits in adolescence are also beneficial for the long-term health benefits they can provide to individuals and ultimately, communities. By recruiting a minimum of six healthcare clinics in implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites to further increase the percentage of youth receiving a wellness visit in the past year. The adolescent Champion model is an 18-month process designed to drive health centers to become adolescent-centered medical homes. It is a multi-faceted intervention to address a health center's environment, policies, and practices to ensure that all aspects of a visit to the health center are youth-centered.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Internal program data from the Office of Women's Health.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 50

10.2 Number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, receiving Medicaid and/or Nevada Check-Up covered preventive well visits. (Nevada)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 3: measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: To increase the number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, receiving preventive well visits.

Numerator: Number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, receiving Medicaid and/or Nevada Check-Up covered preventive well visits (MCO and FFS)

Denominator: N/A

Significance: Adolescents face a variety of health risks and health problems including unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, substance use disorders, and depression, among others. Getting an annual well-visit provides an opportunity for adolescents to discuss any physical, emotional and behavioral health issues they may have.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Nevada Title V/MCH Program

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000,000

10.2 Number of adolescents who participate in a health-centered youth-led project (Idaho)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities directed to families/children/youth

Goal: Through collaboration with the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention program (APP), support youth-led projects, such as clinic assessments in select communities, action research, or participatory evaluation.

Numerator: Number of adolescents who participate in a health-centered youth-led project

Denominator: Not Applicable

Significance: According to 2011/2012 National Survey of Children’s Health data, Idaho children are lagging behind children nationally for receiving a preventive well-visit in the past year-only 73% of Idaho children had received a well-visit compared with 84% of children nationally. Idaho MCH partners with the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program (APP) to support Youth-Adult Partnership (YAP) groups as a positive youth development strategy to complement APP programming. YAP groups plan and implement activities that encourage healthy choices in their schools and communities. This may include youth-led projects such as youth-friendly clinic assessments, action research or participatory evaluation, and other activities that promote reproductive health and APP program goals. Research has shown the benefits of effectively incorporating youth voices into program activities include: increased self-esteem; sense of personal control and enhanced identity development; enhanced development of life skills including leadership, public speaking, and job responsibility; strengthened communication skills with adults, peers and family; and decreased involvement in risky behaviors (Scales & Leffert, 1997). Youth-adult partnerships can serve as a unifying factor when they include authentic decision making, natural mentors, reciprocity, and community connectedness (Zeldin, Christens, & Powers, 2012). Additionally, youth participatory evaluation has been shown to decrease youths’ feelings of alienation and increase understanding of their ability to affect change within their communities (Sabo, 2003).

Data Sources and Data Issues: Source: APP Program Issue: This is expected to be a relatively small number, and projects will vary from year to year, so the number of participants will fluctuate.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1,000

10.2 HPV vaccine coverage of girls age 13 years (Marshall Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2020, achieving greater than or equal to 90% HPV Coverage Rate for 13 years old girls.

Numerator: # females age 13 years who received 2 doses of HPV vaccine (X 100)

Denominator: RMI Female Population aged 13 years (projected mid-year population from 2011 census)

Significance: Cervical cancer has been the leading cause of death in the RMI over the past 10 years; the incidence and death rates from cervical cancer are among the highest in the Pacific in RMI. HPV is the cause of most cases of cervical cancer. Effective delivery of HPV vaccine to girls before the onset of sexual activity can protect the next generation of RMI women from this terrible disease

Data Sources and Data Issues: Query WebIZ for females 13 years of age on the last day of the measurement year (e.g. 3/31/16 for 2016) for the denominator, and select those who have record of 2 HPV doses received for the numerator.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

10.2 Develop and disseminate a teen-centered, Adolescent Resource Toolkit (ART) in collaboration with community health and youth service providers to promote adolescent health and annual wellness visits (Hawaii)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Middle level: enabling services

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase resources, training and practice improvement support for adolescent health and service providers to promote wellness and healthcare visits aligned to Bright Futures.

Numerator: Total Actual Score from Adolescent Health Data Collection Form

Denominator: Total Possible Score from Adolescent Health Data Collection Form (30 total)

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological and social development and the initiation of risky behaviors as teens move from childhood toward adulthood. Teens assume individual responsibility for health habits. An annual preventive well visit may help teens adopt or maintain health habits and behaviors and avoid health damaging behaviors. The Bright Futures guidelines recommend that teens have an annual checkup from age 11-21 years, however many do not. Barriers include: • Lack of awareness of guidelines • Perception that the AWC lacks value • Unaware or variability of insurance coverage and follow up services • High utilization of sports physicals instead of AWC • Inconsistent practices addressing confidentiality • Lack of medical home • Lack of knowledge of community resources. The ART and collaboration with community/youth service providers will help to address many of these barriers and build the knowledge base of professionals working with youth.

Data Sources and Data Issues: This is a summary of the Data Collection Form that lists 10 strategy components organized by the following domains: • Collaboration • Engagement to Develop the Adolescent Resource Toolkit • Workforce Development Training for Community Stakeholders Each item is scored from 0-3 (0=not met; 1=partially met; 2=mostly met; 3=completely met), with a maximum total of 30. Scoring is completed by Adolescent Health staff, with input from key partners.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Scale, Unit Number: 30

10.2 Adolescent Preventive Care Stakeholders Group - Foundational Partnership Building and Collaboration (Montana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Create an effective foundational structure for the new adolescent preventive care stakeholders group. This framework will allow for efficient use of the member's time, and provide a mechanism for raising awareness on the importance of adolescent pre

Numerator: One organization purpose and basic process guidelines document

Denominator: One organization purpose and basic process guidelines document

Significance: During FY 2017, the FCHB is working to identify and survey anyone in the state who might be interested in serving on an adolescent preventive healthcare stakeholders group. Moving forward, the activities and structure of the group will largely be decided by the members. The initial assistance requested from the group will be feedback on content and drafts for targeted messaging, and ideas for promoting the importance of adolescent preventive healthcare visits.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Family & Community Health Bureau

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1

10.3 Optimal Health for Montana Youth - Evaluation Report (Montana)

Measure Status: Active

Measurement Category: Category 1: measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Bottom level: public health services and systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Development, completion, and dissemination of Optimal Health for Montana Youth Evaluation Report.

Numerator: One evaluation report.

Denominator: One evaluation report.

Significance: FCHB's newly created Adolescent Health Section houses the Optimal Health for Montana Youth Program, currently funded through Teen Pregnancy Prevention Tier 2, Sexual Risk Avoidance Education, and Personal Responsibility Education Program grant funds. The Optimal Health for Montana Youth Evaluation Report will assist by evaluating coordinated programmatic activities to inform on the impact, successes, challenges and gaps of services that this program offers to Montana adolescents. The expected outcomes for this evaluation include an increase in protective factors towards risky behaviors, a decrease in risk factors towards risky behaviors, and an increase in utilization of community resources and reproductive health services. Ultimate goals of the programs are to decrease pregnancy and birth rates for youth aged 15-19, reduce birth rate disparities seen in American Indian and rural youths, and decrease the number of youth accounting for new STI/STDs.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Family & Community Health Bureau.

Year: 2018/2020

Unit Type: Count, Unit Number: 1

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.