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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Displaying records 1 through 20 (35 total).

ESM 10.1 Proportion of adolescents aged 12 to 19 that received an adolescent well visit in the past year (Alabama)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the proportion of adolescents aged 12 to 19 that received an adolescent well visit in the Simple County health departments in the past year

Numerator: Number of adolescents aged 12 to 19 that received an adolescent well visit in the Simple County health departments in the past year

Denominator: Number of adolescents aged 12 to 19

Significance: Early identification of developmental disorders is critical to the well-being of adolescents and their families.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Electronic Health Records from Simple County Health Departments

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percentage of adolescents, ages 10 through 19, receiving school-based preventive health services. (Virgin Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school/patient-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the percentage of students receiving school based preventive health care services in the school setting.

Numerator: 590

Denominator: 11803

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. Risky behaviors often initiated in adolescence include unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and use of substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs. Receiving health care services, including annual adolescent preventive well visits, helps adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. Receipt of services can help prepare adolescents to manage their health and health care as adults. The Bright Futures guidelines recommends that adolescents have an annual checkup starting at age 11. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, discussion of health‐related behaviors, and immunizations. It recommends that the annual checkup include discussion of several health‐related topics, including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Title V Program

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percentage of adolescents accessing preventive care who report being referred by their school. (Northern Mariana Islands)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base for this NPM to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: The goal is to increase the number of adolescents accessing annual visits by partnering with the public school system to facilitate referrals.

Numerator: Number of adolescents accessing preventive care who report being referred by their school.

Denominator: Number of adolescents accessing preventive care.

Significance: The adolescent well-visit is an opportunity for adolescents to receive healthcare, counseling, and guidance to help teens identify and adopt or modify behaviors to avoid damage to health, effectively manage chronic conditions, or to prevent disease. Adolescent healthcare is critical for establishing lifelong healthy behaviors and prepares adolescents for transition into adult healthcare.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be collected via a survey instrument.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of students who have a comprehensive wellness visit at school-based health centers. (Alaska)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of youth who receive preventive health services.

Numerator: Number of students who receive a comprehensive wellness visit at school-based health centers.

Denominator: Number of students who attend schools with school-based health centers.

Significance: Adolescent well-care visits are a comprehensive assessment of health with a primary care practitioner or an OB/GYN practitioner during the measurement year. Assessing physical, emotional and social development is important at every stage of life, particularly with children and adolescents. Behaviors established during childhood or adolescence, such as eating habits and physical activity, often extend into adulthood. Well-care visits provide an opportunity for providers to influence health and development. They are a critical opportunity for screening and counseling.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data will be obtained from administrators of the three current districts that have school based health centers, Juneau, Bethel and Anchorage. The number of students who had wellness visits each school year will be requested, as well as the number of students in each school with school based health centers. Foreseeable issues include school closures because of the current COVID-19, which may skew the data. We may adjust indicator objectives accordingly.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of School Based Health Center clients who are male (Massachusetts)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 patient-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the proportion of SBHC clients who are male to more closely reflect the overall student population in Massachusetts

Numerator: Number of male clients at all SBHCs

Denominator: Number of total clients at all SBHCs

Significance: The following studies have shown that SBHCs increase access to care and quality of care for underserved adolescents: - Allison, Mandy A., et al. "School-based health centers: improving access and quality of care for low-income adolescents." Pediatrics 120.4 (2007): e887-e894. - McNall, Miles A., Lauren F. Lichty, and Brian Mavis. "The impact of school-based health centers on the health outcomes of middle school and high school students." American Journal of Public Health 100.9 (2010): 1604-1610. SBHCs offer comprehensive primary care within schools where young people spend most of their time, contributing to engagement in adolescent preventive care. SBHC clinicians are skilled in motivational interviewing and have extensive knowledge of critical issues impacting the students they serve. SBHC clinicians are well integrated within their schools and are knowledgeable about appropriate services within their communities to ensure that students are connected with a medical home. In addition, every effort is made by SBHC staff to help students develop the skills they will need to navigate the health care system upon graduation from high school. Because young men are less likely than women to receive care from SBHCs, this ESM is specifically tracking the percentage of clients who are male, with the goal of reaching a proportion more similar to the student population in the state.

Data Sources and Data Issues: School Based Health Center program database

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of Medicaid EPSDT eligible adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who received at least one initial or periodic screen (Nevada)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of adolescents, ages 12 through 17, receiving preventive well visits.

Numerator: Number of Medicaid EPSDT eligible adolescents, ages 12 through 17, receiving at least one initial or periodic screen

Denominator: Total adolescents, ages 12 through 17, who are eligible for EPSDT

Significance: Adolescents face a variety of health risks and health problems including unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, substance use disorders, and depression, among others. Getting an annual well-visit provides an opportunity for adolescents to discuss any physical, emotional and behavioral health issues they may have.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Nevada Title V/MCH Program

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100,000

ESM 10.1 Percent of adolescents who have a wellness check-up passport. (American Samoa)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base for this NPM to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the percentage of adolescents ages 10 - 17 years receiving a well-visit by 2% annually, for the next five years.

Numerator: Number of adolescents ages 10 - 17 years with a wellness check-up passport.

Denominator: Total number of adolescents 10 - 17 years I the reporting year.

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. Risky behaviors often initiated in adolescence include unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and use of substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs. Receiving health care services, including annual adolescent preventive well visits, helps adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health-damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. Receipt of services can help prepare adolescents to manage their health and health care as adults. The Bright Futures guidelines recommend that adolescents have an annual checkup starting at age 11. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, discussion of health-related behaviors, and immunizations. It recommends that the annual checkup include discussion of several health, related topics, including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety. Establishing an adolescent well-visit passport to include weight management, reproductive health and behavioral health screening and counseling, based on Bright Futures.

Data Sources and Data Issues: UDS

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of adolescents served in Title X clinics. (North Dakota)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the percent of adolescents who have a preventive medical visit.

Numerator: Number of adolescents ages 12 through17 receiving well-visit in the Family Planning Clinic.

Denominator: Number of adolescents ages 12 through 17 receiving services in the Family Planning Clinic.

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors, such as unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and substance use, is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. An annual preventive well visit may help adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. The Bright Futures guidelines recommends that adolescents have an annual checkup from age 11 through 21. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, immunizations, and discussion of health‐related behaviors including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety.

Data Sources and Data Issues: The North Dakota Department of Health Family Planning Program.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of adolescents 12 through 17 with at least one completed BMI at time of medical visit at all school-based health centers (Connecticut)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the percent of adolescents 12-17 who have a BMI measured at the time of a medical visit.

Numerator: Number of adolescents 12-17 with at least one completed BMI at the time of a well visit at all School Based Health Centers (Physical)

Denominator: Number of students 12-17 who had at least one well visit at all School Based Health Centers (Physical)

Significance: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that clinicians screen children ages 6 to 18 years for obesity and refer them to programs to improve their weight status. The recommendations are explained in the special article, “Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement,” in the February 2010 issue of Pediatrics. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that periodic measurement of BMI be performed as part of a comprehensive approach to prevention of pediatric overweight, and recommends that BMI be calculated and documented once a year for all children and adolescents. BMI screening and well child visits have been included as clinical outcome measures for the School Based National Quality Initiative - with School Based Health Center sites in Connecticut participating in the national pilot to establish national quality standards for School Based Health Centers.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Funded School Based Health Centers database and annual contractual program reports. Annual School Based Health Centers Medical Results Based AcSimple Countability Report Cards. National NQI data portal.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of adolescents (12-17) served by Medicaid with adolescent well visit (Ohio)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the percent of adolescents ages 12-17 in Simple County served by Medicaid with adolescent well visit

Numerator: Number of adolescents ages 12 to 17 in Simple Counties served by Medicaid with adolescent well visit

Denominator: Number of adolescents in Simple Counties served by Medicaid ages 12 to 17

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors, such as unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and substance use, is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. An annual preventive well visit may help adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center (2016). Summary of Recommended Guidelines for Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents up to age 18. http://nahic.ucsf.edu/adolescent-guidelines.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Ohio Department of Medicaid

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of adolescent program participants, ages 12 through 17, that had a well-visit during the past 12 months (Kansas)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: This ESM measures access to/receipt of care, thus doesn’t align with a specific evidence-based strategy. Consider developing an ESM for one of the specific strategies in your state action plan to measure performance. Check MCHbest for examples to connect to the evidence.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the percent of adolescents who have a preventive medical visit

Numerator: Adolescent program participants, ages 12 through 17, that had a well-visit during the past 12 months

Denominator: Adolescent program participants, ages 12 through 17

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors, such as unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and substance use, is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. An annual preventive well visit may help adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. The Bright Futures guidelines recommends that adolescents have an annual checkup from age 11 through 21. The visit should cover a comprehensive set of preventive services, such as a physical examination, immunizations, and discussion of health‐related behaviors including healthy eating, physical activity, substance use, sexual behavior, violence, and motor vehicle safety. The adolescent well-care visit measure for health plans is part of the core measure sets for Medicaid and the National Committee for Quality Assurance. National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center (2016). Summary of Recommended Guidelines for Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents up to age 18. http://nahic.ucsf.edu/adolescentguidelines.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Application and Integration Solution for the Early Years (DAISEY): Web-based comprehensive data collection and reporting system/shared measurement system used by all MCH grantees to capture client and visit/service data

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Percent of Adolescent Champion Model sites that obtain Adolescent Centered Environment certification (Wisconsin)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=adolescent+champion&NPM=10&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/10-adolescent-well-visit.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: 100% of Adolescent Champion Model sites will obtain Adolescent Centered Environment certification.

Numerator: Number of Adolescent Champion Model sites that obtain Adolescent Centered Environment certification

Denominator: Number of Adolescent Champion Model sites

Significance: Adolescent Centered Environment certification trains providers and all clinic staff on adolescent rights and needs within the health care setting. Certification supports the development of a welcoming atmosphere and environment for adolescents in health care settings, focusing on inclusivity, signage, and a welcoming and appealing environment for adolescents. With such improvements, it is anticipated that more adolescents will receive an annual preventive medical visit.

Data Sources and Data Issues: HCET or AHI. Acquiring this data will involve communication between the Title V Program and data source. No anticipated issues.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Number of telehealth providers that adopt a standard of care for adolescents (South Carolina)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is some very recent, emerging research in the evidence base for this NPM to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Strengthen availability and access to telehealth services for adolescents, including those with special health care needs

Numerator: Number of adolescent telehealth providers who adopt a standard of care

Denominator: Number of adolescent telehealth providers who adopt a standard of care

Significance: Standards of care are well-established for infants, children and adults; however, the care adolescents receive should include certain provisions specific to their needs (i.e., STD/HPV, vaccinations, substance use prevention) across all SC Simple Counties.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH Program in collaboration with multi-sector partners

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 123,456

ESM 10.1 Number of public schools implementing the PATCH for Teens curriculum as part of their Health Education Curriculum (Vermont)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=school-based+program&NPM=10&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/10-adolescent-well-visit.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Youth choose healthy behaviors and thrive.

Numerator: Number of public schools implementing the PATCH program

Denominator: Number of public schools implementing the PATCH program

Significance: The PATCH (Providers and Teens Communicating for Health) program provides school health educators, health-related professionals, youth workers, and other adults the materials and resources needed to teach young people about their rights and responsibilities in health care settings. Learning objectives include: Students will understand the importance of learning to manage their own health care experiences; Students will learn how to advocate for their own health and well being in health care settings; Students will explore steps they can take to make sure they get the care they need and deserve. The main messages of the program are: Teens need and deserve a good relationship with their health care providers; Teens have legal health care rights; Teens have a personal responsibility to learn to manage their own health care.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: Program data

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Number of healthcare clinics implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites. (Arizona)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=champion&NPM=10&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/10-adolescent-well-visit.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: By 2025, recruit 27 healthcare clinics in implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites.

Numerator: Number of healthcare clinics implementing the University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model.

Denominator: None

Significance: During Arizona's needs assessment process, the community identified promotion of preventive visits and services as a priority for adolescents. While adolescents are generally a healthy population, preventive visits are important to identify and educate about at-risk health conditions or behaviors. Preventive visits in adolescence are also beneficial for the long-term health benefits they can provide to individuals and ultimately, communities. By recruiting a minimum of six healthcare clinics in implementing University of Michigan's Adolescent Champion Model at their sites to further increase the percentage of youth receiving a wellness visit in the past year. The adolescent Champion model is an 18-month process designed to drive health centers to become adolescent-centered medical homes. It is a multi-faceted intervention to address a health center's environment, policies, and practices to ensure that all aspects of a visit to the health center are youth-centered.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Internal program data from the Office of Women's Health.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 50

ESM 10.1 Number of adolescents (ages 10-21) served by school-based health centers (Illinois)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 3: Measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the number of adolescents served by school-based health centers in Illinois

Numerator: # of unduplicated clients ages 10-21 served by school-based health centers

Denominator: n/a

Significance: This ESM will measure an output of strategy #5-E: Certify and support school-based and school-linked health centers to expand access to primary health care, mental health, and oral health services for Illinois children and adolescents. School-based health centers (SBHCs) are a critical health care service location for adolescents, as they make services more accessible and available to youth. While many youth may have other health care providers that they see for formal annual well-visits, there are many other important services that they seek out in SBHCs, including reproductive services, STI testing, mental health services, sick care, and dental services. Through all these services, the SBHC staff are able to build relationships with the youth so they can become trusted sources of information on health and health care. We chose to monitor the total number of adolescents served by SBHCs each year as a way of capturing the widespread reach that SBHCs have on promoting health among adolescents.

Data Sources and Data Issues: DATA SOURCE: IDPH Office of Women’s Health and Family Services, School Health Program

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Simple Count, Unit Number: 100,000

ESM 10.1 In schools with a Health Resource Center (HRC), the percent of youth within that school utilizing HRC services (Pennsylvania)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Center" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 4: Measuring quality of effect (% of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: To increase the percentage of adolescents who utilize a HRC within their school

Numerator: Number of youth ages 12-17 receiving services at an HRC.

Denominator: Number of youth ages 12-17 attending school with a HRC.

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological, and social development. As adolescents move from childhood to adulthood, they assume individual responsibility for health habits, and those who have chronic health problems take on a greater role in managing those conditions. Initiation of risky behaviors is a critical health issue during adolescence, as adolescents try on adult roles and behaviors. Risky behaviors often initiated in adolescence include unsafe sexual activity, unsafe driving, and use of substances, including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs. Receiving health care services, including annual adolescent preventive well visits, helps adolescents adopt or maintain healthy habits and behaviors, avoid health‐damaging behaviors, manage chronic conditions, and prevent disease. Receipt of services can help prepare adolescents to manage their health and health care as adults. Adolescents face many concerns when deciding where to seek sexual-health services. Access to care is important to youth, and when trying to seek care at a primary care physician or clinic, issues may include: “lack of transportation; difficulties making appointments; not knowing where to go; hours and days when services are available; and requirements to return for follow-up.” The HRCs fill this primary care gap by being available and accessible in the schools youth attend and in the communities where they reside. Expanding the number of HRCs in the state will expand availability of vital health services for youth. Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth face unique barriers to care, including confidentiality around their sexual identity and the fear of being “outed”, as well as judgment from health care workers once their sexual orientation is disclosed.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data collection and analysis will be performed by the Grantee that subcontracts with schools and community organizations for the HRCs that are established. It will be a grant deliverable as required by the work statement and reported to DOH via quarterly reports.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

ESM 10.1 Finalize the School Based Health Center Strategic Plan, which is anchored in best-practices. (Delaware)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: Emerging. Aligns with MCHbest strategy "School-based Health Centers" (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/strategies/10-1.php). Find other NPM 10 school-level strategies in MCHbest.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 1: Measuring quantity of effort (counts and "yes/no" activities)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 5. Create/champion/implement policy

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Finalize the School Based Health Center Strategic Plan, which is anchored in best-practices.

Numerator: Strategic Plan complete

Denominator: Strategic Plan

Significance: School Based Health Centers play a key role in providing comprehensive services for adolescents especially are most vulnerable. Services offered include physicals, health assessments, mental health, physical activity consults, nutrition consults as well as reproductive health.

Data Sources and Data Issues: MCH Program Data

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Text, Unit Number: Yes/No

ESM 10.1 Develop and disseminate a teen-centered, Adolescent Resource Toolkit (ART) in collaboration with community health and youth service providers to promote adolescent health and annual wellness visits (Hawaii)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: No similar strategy found in the established evidence for this NPM. See similar ESMs (https://www.mchlibrary.org/evidence/state-esms-results.php?q=&NPM=10&State=&RBA_Category=&MCH_Pyramid=&Recipient=Activities+directed+to+professionals&Status=Active) for this NPM or search for other strategies or promising practices (https://www.mchevidence.org/tools/npm/10-adolescent-well-visit.php).

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 3: Measuring quantity of effect (# of "is anyone better off")

Service Type: Enabling services level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 4. Support and mobilize partners

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase resources, training and practice improvement support for adolescent health and service providers to promote wellness and healthcare visits aligned to Bright Futures.

Numerator: Total Actual Score from Adolescent Health Data Collection Form

Denominator: Total Possible Score from Adolescent Health Data Collection Form (30 total)

Significance: Adolescence is a period of major physical, psychological and social development and the initiation of risky behaviors as teens move from childhood toward adulthood. Teens assume individual responsibility for health habits. An annual preventive well visit may help teens adopt or maintain health habits and behaviors and avoid health damaging behaviors. The Bright Futures guidelines recommend that teens have an annual checkup from age 11-21 years, however many do not. Barriers include: • Lack of awareness of guidelines • Perception that the AWC lacks value • Unaware or variability of insurance coverage and follow up services • High utilization of sports physicals instead of AWC • Inconsistent practices addressing confidentiality • Lack of medical home • Lack of knowledge of community resources. The ART and collaboration with community/youth service providers will help to address many of these barriers and build the knowledge base of professionals working with youth.

Data Sources and Data Issues: This is a summary of the Data Collection Form that lists 10 strategy components organized by the following domains: • Collaboration • Engagement to Develop the Adolescent Resource Toolkit • Workforce Development Training for Community Stakeholders Each item is scored from 0-3 (0=not met; 1=partially met; 2=mostly met; 3=completely met), with a maximum total of 30. Scoring is completed by Adolescent Health staff, with input from key partners.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Scale, Unit Number: 30

ESM 10.1 Average depression screening rate (percentage of well-visits where depression screenings are occurring) in clinics participating in the state’s Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) project (Minnesota)

Measure Status: Active

Evidence Level: There is limited research in the evidence base to support this strategy.

Measurement Quadrant: Quadrant 2: Measuring quality of effort (% of reach; satisfaction)

Service Type: Public health services and systems level of pyramid

Essential Public Health Services: 7. Assure effective and equitable health systems

Service Recipient: Activities related to systems-building

Goal: Increase the number of adolescents that get access to depression screenings to help reduces adolescent suicide and suicide ideation

Numerator: Sum of the depression screening rates across clinics participating in the state’s CoIIN project

Denominator: Number of clinics participating in the state’s CoIIN project

Significance: Minnesota has seen higher rates of suicide among youth than the national average for a long time. It is the second leading cause of death among people ages 10-24 and it is important to acknowledge that suicide is not experienced equally across age groups, genders, or geography in Minnesota. Although helping young people prevent depression, suicide, and other mental health challenges is a community-wide effort, primary care providers are well situated to discuss risks and offer interventions. Offering screening and follow-up at preventive visits helps ensure that young people receive mental health services and support from family and peers. Minnesota is a participant on the Adolescent and Young Adult National Resource Center’s Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) project that aims to improve depression screening and follow-up for adolescents and young adults. Minnesota’s CoIIN Project brings together partners from primary care to implement quality improvement efforts to promote depression screening and follow-up within the clinic setting.

Data Sources and Data Issues: Data Source: National Improvement Partnership Network (NIPN) receives data from clinics participating in the CoIIN project. Adolescent Health Coordinator superstar requests data from NIPN. Limitations of Data: NIPN only provides screening rate for each clinic participating in the CoIIN project so we can’t calculate the percentage of well-visits where depression screenings are occurring in clinics participating in CoIIN project and have to calculate the average screening rate across the clinics instead.

Year: 2020

Unit Type: Percentage, Unit Number: 100

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.